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Full text of "Announcements"

•**/ 












■ i 



the Chicago 
cluster of 
theological 
schools 



Bethany Theological Seminary 

Catholic Theological Union 

Chicago Theological Seminary 

DeAndreis Institute of Theology 

Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

McCormick Theological Seminary 

Meadvilie/Lombard Theological School 

Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 









■ 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1977-1978 



COMMON ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1977-1978 

FALL QUARTER 

September 19-23 Orientation and Registration 

September 26 Classes Begin 

October 20 Cluster Field Education Conference 

November 10 Cluster Interprofessional Symposium : 

Ministry and Social Work Ethics 

November 24-27 Thanksgiving Recess 

November 28-December 2 Registration for Winter Quarter 

December 9 Fall Quarter Ends 

December 10 - January 1 Christmas Recess 

WINTER QUARTER 

January 2 Classes Begin (Late Registration) 

February 9 Cluster Interprofessional Symposium : 

Ministry and Business Ethics 

February 20-24 Registration for Spring Quarter 

March 17 Winter Quarter Ends 

March 18-26 Spring and Easter Recess 

SPRING QUARTER 

March 27 Classes Begin (Late Registration) 

April 2-8 Cluster World Mission Institute 

April 18 Cluster Interprofessional Symposium : 

Ministry and Medical Ethics 

April 28-29 Cluster Interprofessional Symposium : 

Ministry and Legal Ethics 

June 2 Spring Quarter Ends (BTS, CTU, DIT, JSTC, MTS, NBTS) 

June 7 Spring Quarter Ends (LSTC) 

June 9 Spring Quarter Ends (CTS, M/L) 





19 


77 








19 


78 




JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 




JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W ! F S 

------ 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 IS 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


5 M T W T F s 
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6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
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20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 


5 M T w T F S 

- - 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 - - 


S M T w T F S 

----- 1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
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S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
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29 30 31 " " " " 


S M T W T F S 

- - - 1 2 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
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26 27 28 " " " " 


S M T w r F s 
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S M I W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 




MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M I W I F S 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
'29 30 31 " " " " 


S M T W I F S 

- - - 1-234 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 " - 


S M T W T F S 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
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S M T W T F S 

- 1 2 3 4 5 6 
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14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 - - - 


S M T W I F S 
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14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 " " " 


S M T W T F S 

- - - - 1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 - 


S M I W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


5 M I W T F S 

- - 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 " ■ 




















SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 

- - - - 1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 - 


S M T W I F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


5 M T W T F S 

- - 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 - - - 


S M T W T F S 

- - - - 1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M I W T F S 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 - - - - 


s M I w I F s 
- - - 1 2 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 - - 


S M T W T F S 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Foreword 3 

Cluster Institutions 5 

Course Identification Code 12 

Cluster Areas of Concentration 13 

Personal Transformation 15 

Social Transformation 17 

Celebration 19 

Cross-Cultural Communication 21 

Interpretation and Communication: Teaching 24 

Interpretation and Communication: Preaching 27 

Cluster Pastoral Care and Counseling Program 30 

Cluster Interinstitutional Team-Taught Courses 33 

Cluster Inter-Campus Courses 38 

Cluster Black Studies 40 

Cluster Women's Issues 44 

Cluster Latino Studies 48 

Courses of Study 52 

Biblical Studies 52 

Old Testament 52 

New Testament 56 

Biblical Languages 62 

Judaic Studies 63 

Historical Studies 63 

Theological Studies 71 

Ethical Studies 84 

World Mission Studies 89 

Ministry Studies 91 

Nature and Functions of Ministry 91 

Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction 92 

Liturgy and Worship 97 

Preaching and Communication 100 

Religious Education 103 

Organization and Administration 105 

Church and Community 107 

Canon Law 108 

Theological Librarianship 109 

Supervised Ministry 109 

Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 112 

Cluster Personnel 115 

Faculty and Executive Officers 115 

Librarians 131 

Announcements 133 

Cluster Library Services 133 

Cluster Theological Language Courses 134 

Cluster Center for Theology and Ministry in Global Perspective 134 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science 135 

Institute on the Church in Urban-Industrial Society 137 

Chicago Theological Institute 138 

Chicago Area Colleges and Universities 139 



FOREWORD 



According to a recent New York Times article the Chicago Cluster is "an ex- 
periment in theological education that many seminary experts believe to be the 
most broad-based and potentially influential design in the nation." After men- 
tioning several other cooperative programs the author added that "none has 
created quite the attraction that the Chicago Cluster has generated." 

Why this attraction? 

Because the Chicago Cluster is broad-based. That is one reason. Evangelicals, 
Catholics, Liberal Protestants, Mainline Protestants in actual cross-registration suf- 
ficient to provide opportunity for serious dialogue in numerous courses. Great 
varieties in personnel — in race, sex, nationality, age, theological understanding, etc. 
Yet each of the nine schools provides its own educational matrix and has as its pur- 
pose preparation for a particular denomination and tradition. And all the schools 
concentrate upon preparation for professional ministry. 

Thus a student is invited into a richly varied context and an ecumenical 
fellowship in order to undertake disciplined intellectual effort and serious for- 
mation for the ministry of a particular church. 

This past year there were well over 1000 instances of cross-registration, which is 
a good sign that students are finding the value in a wide range of choice as they 
shape their own best educational experiences. 

One unique feature of the Chicago "experiment in theological education" is the 
Areas of Concentration, four or more opportunities each year to specialize for a 
term, with the outstanding faculty resources from nine schools, in such areas of 
.ministry as: Personal Transformation, Social Transformation, Celebration, Cross- 
Cultural Communication, Teaching and Preaching. 

Other features of the Cluster in terms of academic offerings constitute the first 
part of this book. Enriched library offerings through cooperation, ecumenical wor- 
ship, outstanding visiting lecturers, and a number of other events and programs 
enrich the educational milieu for students of the Cluster schools. 

Both as an ecumenical community and as an educational consortium the 
Chicago Cluster shows signs of vitality and growth which translate into an exciting 
and enriching context for the study of theology and for preparation for ministry. 



Frederick K. Wentz 
Executive Director 



CLUSTER INSTITUTIONS 

CHICAGO CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

The Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools is an ecumenical association of six 
Protestant and three Roman Catholic seminaries. While preserving their legal 
autonomy and denominational integrity, the schools espouse common com- 
mitments to provide graduate professional education of the highest order in 
equipping men and women for leadership as ministers, priests, and laypersons in 
serving the world and the church. 

Such common commitments involve educational, theological, and financial pur- 
poses. Educationally, the Cluster reflects the purpose of its member schools to 
maximize the scope and depth of excellence in theological preparation made 
possible by the coordinated sharing and development of resources such as 
faculties, libraries, auxiliary services, physical plants, and funds for new and 
ongoing programs. Theologically, the Cluster reflects the purpose of its member 
schools to prepare leaders whose identities are both rooted in their respective con- 
fessional and ecclesial traditions and informed by appreciation of the richness of 
ecumenical and interfaith perceptions of divine concern for the world. Financially, 
the Cluster reflects the purpose of its member schools to obtain the best educational 
return on the investment of funds entrusted to their stewardship by realizing fiscal 
economies through consolidated institutional purchasing and through coordinated 
elimination of unnecessary duplication of resources. 

The Cluster was organized in 1970 and incorporated as a not-for-profit cor- 
poration in 1971. Of its eight founding institutions, five Protestant schools 
represented a corresponding number of denominations and three Roman Catholic 
schools represented or officially served eight religious communities and one 
diocese. Since the Cluster's formation, these founding schools have officially been 
joined by nine additional Roman Catholic religious communities and by another 
Protestant seminary. Jewish presence and studies have been provided during these 
years through cooperating institutions. 

Six of the nine member schools are grouped closely together on the south side of 
Chicago adjacent to the University of Chicago. Two are located on contiguous 
campuses in west suburban Oak Brook, and one is situated in the southwest 
suburb of Lemont. 

The Cluster's diverse and extensive networks of resources for theological 
education are unparalleled in the Midwest and are among the most outstanding in 
North America. The nine Cluster schools offer a variety of academic and 
professional degrees at the master's and doctoral levels, and programs of con- 
tinuing education for clergy and laity. The almost 1,400 Cluster students have ac- 
cess to resources such as those represented by 175 faculty (of whom 130 are full- 
time), including 11 Blacks and 18 women; more than 450 courses annually; library 
collections of some 800,000 volumes and 1,700 currently-received periodicals; con- 
temporary electronic media equipment (including portable and studio video 
capabilities) and modern language lab facilities; and three centers for specialized 
research and ministry dealing, respectively, with religion and science, the church 
and urban- industrial society, and theology and ministry in global perspective. 

Beyond the resources of the Cluster are those of six other Chicago-area 
theological schools upon which Cluster students may draw, together with the vast 
resources of numerous institutions of higher learning and innumerable 
organizations and agencies of a religious, humanitarian, cultural or scientific 
character in and about the metropolitan environs. 



Cluster Common Council 



Officers 
Chairman 
Vice-Chairman 
Treasurer 
Secretary 



Warren F. Groff, Bethany Theological Seminary 

William G. Guindon, S.J., Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 

Don S. Hasty, McCormick Theological Seminary 

Frederick K. Wentz, Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 



Representatives of Member Institutions 
Bethany Theological Seminary 
Catholic Theological Union 
Chicago Theological Seminary 
DeAndreis Institute of Theology 
Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Mead ville /Lombard Theological School 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Warren F. Groff 

Alcuin Coyle, O.F.M. 

C. Shelby Rooks 

Anthony J. Falanga, CM. 

William G. Guindon, S.J. 

Arthur O. Arnold 

Jack L. Stotts 

John C. Godbey 

William R. Myers 



Representative of Deans 
Representative of Librarians 
Representative of Business Managers 



Lewis S. Mudge, McCormick Theological Seminary 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P., Catholic Theological Union 

James Hartke, O.F.M., Catholic Theological Union 



Representative of Development Directors p. Floyd McDowell, Bethany Theological Seminary 

Representative of Students To be Named 

Cluster Administrative Officers (See below) 

Cluster Administrative Officers and Staff 

Executive Director Frederick K. Wentz 

Director of Academic Affairs Donald F. Williams 

Director of Library Programs Neil W. Gerdes 

Director of Global Perspective Center Archimedes Fornasari, F. S.C.J. 

International Programs Coordinator Olfat El-Mallakh 

Black Studies Coordinator To be Named 

Women's Issues Coordinator Susan M. Elliott 

Student Affairs Coordinator Mark R. Vance 

Data Processing Manager Henry W. Dahlberg 

Secretary Sheree L. Sorensen 



Old Testament 

New Testament 

Church History 

Theology 

Ethics 

World Mission 

Pastoral Care 

Worship and Preaching 

Religious Education 

Supervised Ministry 

Continuing Education 

Deans 

Librarians 

Business Managers 

Development Directors 

Registrars 



Cluster Faculty and Staff Convenors 

Alphonse Spilly, C.PP.S., Catholic Theological Union 

Michael F. Walsh, CM., DeAndreis Institute of Theology 

Robert H. Fischer, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

John E. Burkhart, McCormick Theological Seminary 

Sebastian MacDonald, C.P., Catholic Theological Union 

John Boberg, S.V.D., Catholic Theological Union 

Philip A. Anderson, Chicago Theological Seminary 

LeRoy E. Kennel, Bethany Theological Seminary 

E. Alfred Jenkins, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Dennis O. Kennedy, CM., DeAndreis Institute of Theology 

Henry J. Croes, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Lewis S. Mudge, McCormick Theological Seminary 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P., Catholic Theological Union 

James Hartke, O.F.M. , Catholic Theological Union 

E. Floyd McDowell, Bethany Theological Seminary 

Margaret Nichols, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 



BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Bethany education is shaped by Church of the Brethren concerns in such areas as 
peace, discipleship, and servanthood. It seeks to provide a community of scholar- 
ship and faith where insistence upon academic excellence is balanced by concern 
for personal growth. Curricular design includes peer accountability groupings 
oriented toward integration of heritage and ministerial competencies. 




President 

Dean 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Treasurer and Business Manager 

Director of Development 

Registrar 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree 

M.A.Th. 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



Warren F. Groff 

Graydon F. Snyder 

Donald E. Miller 

John A. Eichelberger 

E. Floyd McDowell 

Carole E. Loats 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

3 years 
9 years 



Butterfield and Meyers Roads 

Oak Brook, Illinois 60521 

(312) 620-2200 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 



A collaborative school serving sixteen religious orders, founded to promote diverse 
theological and ministerial traditions within the Roman Catholic Church. Empha- 
sis on preparation for ministry, hence flexible academic pattern augmented by 
strong field education program. Other special features: fully individualized M.A. 
program; World Mission Program designed to prepare American and foreign stu- 
dents to minister in other cultures. Programs open to all serious students, men 
and women. 



President 

Vice President and Dean 
Director of M.A. Program 
Dean of Students 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Director of Development 
Registrar 

Degree Programs: 
Name of Degree 

M.A. in Theology 

M.Div. 

M.Div. with Mission Specialization 



Alcuin Coyle, O.F.M. 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. 

Roman Vanasse, O.Praem. 

John Paul, M.S.C. 

James Hartke, O.F.M. 

Paul White, C.PP.S. 

Mildred A. Henke 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

3-4 years 

3-4 years 



5401 South Cornell Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312) 324-8000 




CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



An ecumenical seminary related to the United Church of Christ. A style fostering 
rigorous theological inquiry and development of students' own intellectual and 
professional integrity in an atmosphere of diversity and freedom. Normative pro- 
fessional program is the 4 year D.Min., but the M.A. or M.Div. may be awarded 
at 2nd and 3rd year terminal points for cause. Post-M.Div., D.Min. available, 
full or part-time. Academic doctorate is awarded in three areas: Jewish-Christian 
Studies, Reformation and Free Church Studies, Studies in Theology and the Hu- 
man Sciences. 

President 
Academic Dean 
Director of Studies 
Director of Student Services, 

Registrar 
Director of Business Affairs 
Vice President, Relations and 

Development 
Degree Programs: 
Name of Degree 

M.A. in Religious Studies 

M.Div. 

D.Min. 

D.Th. 




C. Shelby Rooks 

Perry D. LeFevre 

Barbara B. Zikmund 

Barbara M. Byhouwer 
James H. Legg 



Paul M. Bartholomew 
Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 
6 years 



5757 South University Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312) 752-5757 



DE ANDREIS INSTITUTE OF THEOLOGY 

A professional institute of theological and ministerial studies owned and con- 
ducted by the Vincentian Fathers. De Andreis primarily prepares candidates for 
the Catholic priesthood, especially those preparing to serve in the pastoral and 
educational apostolates of the Vincentian Community. Students may take part 
of their course work at DePaul University. 

President 
Academic Dean 
Dean of Men 
Asst. Dean of Men 
Business Manager 
Registrar 

Degree Programs: 
Name of the Degree 

M.A. in Theology 

M.Div. 



Anthony J. Falanga, CM. 
James A. Fischer, CM. 
William E. Hartenbach, CM. 
Michael F. Walsh, CM. 
Anthony J. Wiedemer, CM. 
John P. Minogue, CM. 
Time Beyond the A.B. 
Normally Required 
2 years 
4 years 
511 East 127th Street 
Lemont, Illinois 60439 
(312) 257-5454 




institute of theology 



8 



JESUIT SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY IN CHICAGO 



A Roman Catholic professional school of ministry stressing an integrated academic 
-ministerial program, sponsored by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) of the United 
States. A majority of the students are Jesuits, but JSTC is open to all qualified men 
and women willing to share in free and responsible exchange of ideas, learn- 
ing and service. 

President and Dean William G. Guindon, S.J. 

Treasurer Alice E. Barrett 

Registrar To be Named 

Degree Program : Time Beyond A. B. 

Name of Degree Normally Required 

M.Div. (Loyola) 3-4 years 

5430 South University Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312) 324-9200 




LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO 

Preparation for professional ministry in the church, advanced studies in ministry, 
academic study of theology. Curriculum features strong accent upon study of the 
traditions of the church and a comprehensive field work program. A seminary 
of the Lutheran Church in America. 



President 

Dean of Faculty 

Dean of Student Services 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 

Director of Admissions 

Business Manager 

Director of Development 

Registrar 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree 

M.A.R. 

M.T.S. 

M.Div. 

Th.M. 

Th.D. 

D.Min (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 
1100 East 55th Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60615 
(312) 667-3500 



Arthur O. Arnold 

Wesley J. Fuerst 

Jean Bozeman 

Franklin Sherman 

Robert Tobias 

Wilhelm C. Linss 

Randall W. Jackson 

Luther R. Livingston 

Margaret Nichols 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

2 years 

4 years 

6 years 

8 years 

10 years 



S$M 




McCORMICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



McCormick Theological Seminary is a theological center for the United Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America. It also welcomes students from out- 
side this denomination. It focuses its education resources on education for the 
ministry, emphasizing both pre-professional and professional studies. Its program 
of Latino Studies, Women's Studies, and its emphasis on internationalization 
add to its other offerings. On the Master's level, students are encouraged to plan, 
with advice, their own course of studies. 




President 

Dean of the Seminary 

Director of Studies 

Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 

Director of Student Services 

Vice President for Business Affairs 

Vice President for Seminary Relations 

Registrar 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree 

M.A. in Theological Studies 

M.Div.* 

M.Div./M.S.W. 

M.Div. /M.A.L.S. 

Th.M. 

S.T.M. 

D.Min. (2 years in ministry prerequisite) 

*May be taken with specialization in Latino Studies; Diploma 

in Latino Studies (3 yr. program) may be converted to M.Div. 

upon completion of baccalaureate degree. 

5555 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312) 241-7800 



Jack L. Stotts 

Lewis S. Mudge 

Ardith S. Hayes 

Robert C. Worley 

Barbara Prasse 

Don S. Hasty 

Raymond A. Bowden 

Shirley S. Dudley 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 
4 years 
4 years 
4 years 
8 years 



MEAD VILLE /LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 

Historically related to the Unitarian Universalist Association, Meadville/Lombard 
offers a program of ministerial education that usually begins with joint registra- 
tion with the Divinity School of the University of Chicago (with which the school 
is fully affiliated) for the university M.A. in Religious Studies. Advanced standing 
may be given for other previous graduate work. After the M.A., students general- 
ly pursue the Meadville D.Mn. as the normative professional degree. 



Academic Dean 

Executive Administrator 

Administrative Officer 

Admissions Officer and Dean of Students 

Acting Dean of Students 

Assistant Registrar 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree 



D.Mn. 



John C. Godbey 

Mason F. McGinness 

Neil W. Gerdes 

Neil H. Shadle 

Peter I. Kaufman 

Gerda Blackstone 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

4 years 




5701 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312) 753-3195 



10 



NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



The educational purpose of the Seminary is the graduate professional theological 
education of men and women for ministry. The study and application of the Scrip- 
tures is considered foundational. The faculty promotes free discussion and inquiry 
in a community of scholars. Growth of the whole person is fostered in a caring 
community. The Seminary is related to the American Baptist Churches, U.S.A. 
and welcomes students from all Christian traditions and encourages participation 
in ecumenical dialogue. 




President 

Dean 

Director of Student Affairs 

Business Manager 

Asst. to President for Development 

Registrar 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree 

M.A. in Christian Education 
M.A. in Theological Studies 
M.Div. 

660 East Butterfield Road 

Lombard, Illinois 60148 

(312) 620-2200 



William R. Myers 
Gerald L. Borchert 
Mary E. Wilson 
Richard G. Gerber 
Lowell E. Hendrickson 
Ayline L. Wilson 
Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 
2 years 

2 years 

3 years 



11 



COURSE IDENTIFICATION CODE 

The following courses of study are offered during the present academic year by the 
Cluster and its member schools. Information on courses to be offered in subse- 
quent years by the several schools may in some cases be obtained from their re- 
spective current catalogs. 

Each course number is preceded by the initials of the institution(s) by which it is 
offered, viz: 

Meadville /Lombard 
Theological School 
McCormick Theological 
Seminary 
Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary 
Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools 
Center for Religion and 
Psychotherapy of Chicago 



BTS — Bethany Theological 


M/L 


Seminary 




CTS — Chicago Theological 


MTS 


Seminary 




CTU — Catholic Theological 


NBTS 


Union 




DIT — DeAndreis Institute of 


CCTS 


Theology 




JSTC — Jesuit School of Theology 


CRPC 


in Chicago 




LSTC — Lutheran School of 




Theology at Chicago* 




Most Cluster schools employ the following 


letterir 


field of each course of study : 




B — Biblical Studies 




H — Historical Studies 




T — Theological Studies 




E — Ethical Studies 




W — World Mission Studies 




M — Ministry Studies 




I — Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 








Chicago Theological Seminary employs the following lettering system for 
designating the field of each course of study : 

CH — Christian Heritage 

TEC — Theology, Ethics and Contemporary Culture 

CM — Christian Ministries 

The Cluster schools employ a common numbering system for designating the level 
of each course of study. The levels of study are as follows : 

300-399 Introductory 

400-499 Intermediate 

500-599 Advanced 

600-699 Doctoral (In-Ministry D.Min., Th.D.) 

Unless indicated in parenthesis following the course number, each entry is a Full 
Course valued at 3 or 4 quarter hours credit. 

Tutorial or independent study is available in a variety of areas in most fields of the 
curriculum in all quarters, upon request of the student and upon approval of the 
instructor. 






12 



CLUSTER AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

Introduction 

Among a variety of cooperative enterprises, tfye Cluster offers six unique 
programs of education for ministry which draw in an integrated manner upon the 
resources of its member schools and the metropolitan Chicago area. These six 
Cluster Areas of Concentration are Personal Transformation, Social Trans- 
formation, Celebration, Cross-cultural Communication, and Interpretation and 
Communication: Teaching and Interpretation and Communication: Preaching. 
Brief identification of the major aspects of the planning process by which these 
programs have been developed will highlight their distinctive features. 

I. The Mandate for Planning 

The six Areas of Concentration represent the present stage of development in 
a process of several years of long range academic planning. Such planning in- 
cluded the combined efforts of faculty, students, and staff who accepted the 
challenge to develop "a plan which will make the Cluster more than a 'coor- 
dinating instrumentality' " and "a blueprint for doing better together what we 
cannot achieve alone and for creating new and better styles of theological 
education ... or of improving the styles we already follow." 

II. The Basis of Planning 

All such planning has incorporated the principle of differential participation 
at the level of both the individual school and the individual student. At the 
institutional level each seminary retains full control over its own academic 
program, including: (1) the determination of the nature, scope, and manner 
of fulfilling the requirements which its own students must complete in their 
home school; and (2) the determination of whether and in what manner it 
wishes to participate as an institution, or wishes its students to participate, in 
the Cluster Areas of Concentration. (Differential participation at the level of 
the individual student will be noted below.) 

III. The Paramenters of Planning 

With such common basis for planning as background, other crucial issues 
emerged. The decisions made regarding these fundamental issues constitute 
the planning parameters within which the Areas of Concentration have been 
shaped. 

A. The Curricular Model 

Since each school in the Cluster continues to offer its own introductory 
and advanced requirements related to such matters as denominational 
and confessional identity, spiritual formation, and ordination, the 
Cluster Areas of Concentration are not designed as a core curriculum in 
which all beginning students in each of the schools are expected to par- 
ticipate. Rather, the Areas of Concentration are designed as intermediate 
and advanced elective offerings which are open to students who have 
completed at least one year of theological education and who have 
satisfied such other prerequisites as may be appropriate in a particular 
Area. 

B. The Organizing Principle 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to transcend the personal and 

13 



professional fragmentation which frequently accompanies educational 
experiences which are circumscribed by a particular discipline or field or 
by a particular ministerial role or setting. Therefore, the concentrations 
have been organized in terms of broad areas of functional competence 
which are relevant to a variety of ministerial roles and settings and which 
are dependent upon the integration of performance and insights from a 
variety of disciplines. 

C. The Defining Educational Characteristic 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to foster maximum feasible in- 
corporation of the following interfaces: 

1. instructional interface — integration of insights from a variety of 
disciplines and fields, both classical and practical, through the 
assistance of faculty teams whose members represent such expertise; 

2. contextual interface — integration of theory and practice through the 
utilization of action-reflection styles of learning wherein students 
engage in and reflect upon ministries of various kinds with the 
assistance of peer consultation and professional supervision; 

3. formational interface — integration of the student's personal identity 
and professional identity, wherein understandings, attitudes, values 
and skills appropriate to each are experienced and perceived as 
mutually interdependent; 

4. professional interface — clarification of the student's professional iden- 
tity as minister (e.g., role, status, authority) in relation to members of 
other professions and occupations which represent corresponding areas 
of functional competence; 

5. ecumenical interface — inclusion of students and faculty representing 
diverse theological and ecclesiological traditions; and 

6. institutional interface — inclusion of students and faculty representing 
two or more institutions in the Cluster, and the utilization of in- 
stitutional resources outside the Cluster. 

D. The Defining Structural Characteristics 
1. Differential Student Participation 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to be sufficiently flexible to 
enable students with varying degrees of interest and curricular freedom 
to participate in one or more such programs in the pursuit of several 
types of educational and ministerial objectives : 

a. to develop a generalized focus of competence which may (1) serve 
to inform and enrich other functional competencies required of 
"generalists" in a variety of ministries or (2) serve as a general foun- 
dation upon which the specialized competence required for 
ministries in research and scholarship may subsequently be built; 

b. to develop a more specialized focus of competence which may (1) 
provide an organizing center for other areas of competence required 
of generalists, (2) provide necessary preparation for those whose 
primary, if not exclusive, form of ministry will correspond to one 
of the areas of concentration, or (3) provide a more specialized 

14 



foundation upon which the additional competencies required of 

researchers and scholars may be subsequently built; and 
c. to develop a more individualized focus of competence which may 

not correspond wholly to either of the foregoing patterns but which 

best serves the particular student. 
Functional Standardization 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to be sufficiently stan- 
dardized to provide a functional degree of educational coherence and 
administrative compatibility. The several Units which will be offered 
during the current year are described in the following pages. 



CCTS 1-500 PERSONAL TRANSFORMATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

I. Nature of the Unit 

Intensive Unit I is an in-depth experience in a learning-transforming com- 
munity for students who wish to acquire intermediate levels of competence in 
helping individuals and face-to-face groups more fully ^ to actualize their 
potential through multi-faceted growth models. It is envisioned that all stu- 
dents regardless of their previous experience, can grow, try out new ways of 
behavior for enabling growth, teach others, explore new theories and be 
members of the community. 

The Unit consists of one intensive quarter of involvement for which 
students will receive two or three full courses credit. With the ap- 
proval of the respective institutions in which they are matriculated, students 
who are involved in the Unit may also enroll in one or two additional cour- 
ses. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of Intensive Unit I include the following : 

A. to assist students to develop a pastoral theological theory and research 
methodology relative to personal transformation which is grounded in 
the classical theological disciplines (Bible, history, ethics, and theology) 
and which is informed by dialogue with the history of the cure of souls, 
contemporary theory and practice in pastoral counseling and clinical 
pastoral education, and relevant secular disciplines; 

B. to assist students to acquire direct personal experience of selected modes 
of personal transformation; and 

C. to assist students to acquire appropriate levels of competence in the uses 
of various modes of personal transformation. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are three principal components in Intensive Unit I: a learning- 
transforming community, ministry placements, and try-out events. 

A. A Learning-Transforming Community 

The faculty and students will be members in a learning-transforming 
community. The process of building such a community will begin with a 
five-day founding experience during January. The experience will be 
held in an appropriate retreat setting offering opportunities for recreation 
as well as interaction. 

15 



During this time group covenants for the quarter will be developed and 
theoretical and practical inputs will be organized. Individual student 
covenants, which will also be developed at this time, will include the 
identification of the specific personal and professional skills and 
theoretical understandings on which one wants to work during the quar- 
ter. With permission of the faculty member(s) involved, students may 
also design their individual covenants to include required work which 
they would normally be expected to complete through another course; 
upon fulfillment of their covenants to the satisfaction of the faculty mem- 
bers) students would have fulfilled all or part of the course requirement. 

During the subsequent weeks the total group will meet from 9:00 A.M. 
to 9:00 P.M. on Wednesdays and from 9:00-12:00 noon on Thursdays, 
possibly away from the Cluster. (Within these scheduled class sessions 
students enrolled for two full courses credit may negotiate appropriately 
reduced involvement.) Sub-groups/learning teams will also work together 
at other times on common interests, projects, theories, skill training, and 
personal growth. 

The learning-transforming community will be engaged in four continuing 
activities: 

1. Acquiring and developing theory, content, and skills related to per- 
sonal transformation. 

The theoretical inputs and content on growth and change will be 
wide-ranging and will be dependent upon the covenants established by 
the individual members and/ or group. Illustrative possibilities in- 
clude: prayer, spiritual direction, meditation, Yoga, and demon- 
ology; theological understandings of grace, reconciliation, Chris- 
tian community, confession, justification, redemption, and ethics; 
the meaning of the biblical themes, experiences, and words in the 
context of personal transformation and contemporary life; the 
relationship between piety and activism — personal and social trans- 
formation; theories of personality and human development; the 
human potential movement, including Gestalt Therapy, Transactional 
Analysis, encounter, psychosynthesis, and bio-energetics; and 
therapeutic models such as psychoanalysis and ego-psychology. 

2. Experiencing of one's own growth and of enabling others to grow, 
both within the community and in try-out with others outside. 

3. Reflecting upon the experience and theory. 

4. Evaluating the ongoing process and the life of the community. 

Evaluative decisions will be agreed upon communally within the 
following general guidelines; a paper or project indicating integration of 
theory and skills, as well as self-evaluation, peer evaluation, and super- 
visory evaluation, will serve as bases for evaluation at the end of the 
Unit. 

B. Ministry Placements 

It is expected that all students will be involved in some form of ministry 
which provides leadership experience in personal transformation and that 

16 






such involvement will be utilized in the Unit. Students without access to 
such involvements will be assisted to find appropriate placement during 
the quarter in which the Unit is offered. Students who desire to do so 
will also be assisted to find appropriate placement in the quarter 
preceding the Unit. 

C. Try-out Events 

In addition to the experiences of leadership which are expected of them 
within the Unit and within their respective placements, students will be 
provided opportunity to become team leaders with faculty members in 
designing, executing, and evaluating short-term personal transformation 
events for other persons and groups. Possibilities for try-outs may in- 
clude such organizations, groups and occasions as the following: 
Cluster, churches, lay people, house church weekends, spiritual week- 
ends, and experiential theology weekends. 

IV. Admission to the Unit 

Open to students (1) who have completed one or more years of theological 
education; (2) who have had some of the following experience and training 
(one or more quarters of Clinical Pastoral Education; laboratory experiences 
in small groups, personal growth, etc.; basic courses in personal counseling 
and group work); and (3) who have obtained- the approval both of the 
school in which they are matriculated and of the Personal Transformation 
teaching team. Approval of the teaching team should be requested through 
an application form which may be obtained from the office of the registrar at 
each school. 



CCTS 1-520 SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 



Fall Quarter, 1977 and 

Winter Quarter, 1978 
2 Full Courses Credit 
Friday, 9:00 A.M. -12:00 Noon 

+ Field Experiences 
Enrollment limited to 25 
Initial Session at MTS 



Carl S. Dudley 

Professor of Church and Community 

McCormick Theological Seminary 
Earl L. Durham 

Assistant Professor, School of Social 
Service Administration 

University of Chicago 
John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Associate Professor of Ethics 

Catholic Theological Union 
Marjorie Tuite, O.P. 

Coordinator of Ministerial Program 

Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 



I. Nature of the Unit 

Intensive Unit I is designed for upper level students who wish to acquire 
further competence in assisting the church and other institutions to become 
increasingly effective in the transformation of social structures in the light of 
Judeo-Christian values. It is intended both for those who are equipping them- 
selves for ministries with the church as the object and agent of social change 



17 



and for those who are preparing for service in agencies of social change other 
than the church. 

The unit consists of a two-quarter sequence of involvement for which 
students will receive two full courses credit. Credit will be granted only 
upon successful completion of the full sequence. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of Intensive Unit I include the following: 

A. to assist students to develop an understanding of the interrelationships 
between Christain faith and the ministry of social transformation, in- 
cluding the insights of biblical, historical, ethical, and theological 
disciplines; 

B. to assist students to develop an understanding of the basis in social scien- 
tific disciplines for strategy and tatics of social action; 

C. to assist students to understand the ways in which one's own beliefs, at- 
titudes and values affect a ministry of social change; and 

D. to assist students to become insightful and responsible participants in 
ministries of social change within church and community. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are three principal components in Intensive Unit I: theoretical presen- 
tations, experiences in social change, and integrative seminars. 

A. Theoretical Presentations 

The theoretical presentations will deal with four general areas and their 
interrelationships; tactics and strategy for social change; social theory and 
voluntary associations; the Bible, theology, and social change; and 
historical and ethical analysis of the role of the church in relation to 
social issues in America. 

B. Experiences in Social Change 

Each student must have an experience in a ministry of social trans- 
formation as a point of reference for learning in the course. Students 
may be involved concurrently with the course in a ministry of social 
transformation either in a church or in a secular institution, agency or 
movement which aims at social change. (Aditional credit may be 
available for field education if the placement is approved by the in- 
stitution in which the student is enrolled.) Or students may have had a 
significant experience in a ministry of social change prior to this course. 

In addition to churches, placement possibilities include the following: 
educational institutions (public, private, and alternative schools and 
colleges and universities); private and governmental agencies concerned 
with mental health, medical care, racial justice, women's rights, welfare, 
and housing; penal institutions and agencies related to the criminal 
justice system; community organizations; financial and investment in- 
stitutions; the Alliance to End Repression, etc. 

C. Integrative Seminars 

Students will share the leadership of seminars to integrate theory and 
theology, strategy and tatics, in particular areas of social transformation. 
Integrative seminars will be conducted at the site of the ministry and 
with the people most involved whenever possible. 

18 



Project-reports indicating integration of theoretical and practical data as 
well as evidence of students' ability to function as insightful and respon- 
sible participants in ministries of social transformation will serve as bases 
for evaluation at the end of the Unit. 

It is anticipated that students' involvement in the program during the two 
quarters will average 10 hours per week, including class time, study, and 
ministry responsibilities. 

IV. Admission 

Open to students who have completed one or more years of theological 
education and who have obtained the approval of the school in which they 
are matriculated. 

Open also to others with backgrounds in theological and sociological 
disciplines and/or in social change experience who have obtained the ap- 
proval both of the school in which they are matriculated and of the Social 
Transformation teaching team. 

Approval of the student's prior or proposed field experience in social trans- 
formation should be obtained before the completion of registration for the 
course. Such approval should be requested from a member of the Social 
Transformation teaching team or from a faculty member to be designated at 
the student's home school. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission may 
register at either of the following times: (1) at the time of their school's 
Spring pre-registration period for Fall quarter courses or (2) at the time of 
their school's Fall registration period for Fall courses — September 19-23, 
1977. 



CCTS 1-540 CELEBRATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 



Spring Quarter, 1978 
2 or 3 Full Courses Credit 
Thursday 9:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. 
Enrollment limited to 20 
Initial session at LSTC 



Frank B. Brown 

Director of Music and Composer in 

Residence 
University Church of the Disciples of 
Christ 
Joseph A. Sittler 

Visiting Professor in Theology 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chi- 
cago 
Donald Wardlaw 

Professor of Preaching and Worship 
McCormick Theological Seminary 



Nature of the Unit 

Intensive Unit I is an experience in a learning-celebrating community for the 
advanced student who wishes to become an ARTIST-INTERPRETER-IN- 
STIGATOR of religious celebration. The phrase "artist-interpreter-instigator" 
indicates that the objectives of the Unit go beyond assisting the student to 



19 



acquire the ability to function as leader of public worship which is charac- 
teristically expected of all ministers. The phrase "religious celebration" in- 
cludes both the traditional forms of worship and also paraliturgical and other 
forms of communal celebration in the Judeo-Christian tradition. 

The Unit consists of one intensive quarter of involvement for which students 
will receive two or three full courses credit. With the approval of the respec- 
tive institutions in which they are matriculated, students who are in- 
volved in the Unit may also enroll in one or two additional courses. 

II. Aims of the Unit 
The general aim of Intensive Unit I is to assist the student to engage in the 
crucial acts of becoming/ growing as an artist-interpreter-instigator, viz. : 

A. to experience and comprehend how communal celebration bursts out of a 
people from the events of their common life, and from intensive lived 
moments of individual persons; 

B. to experience communal celebration as a mobilization of expressive arts 
and spontaneity; and 

C. to learn to share in the common experience and felt understandings of an 
actual people, especially the People of God, in such a way as to enable 
them to transform their lived moments into communal symbol and fresh 
communal celebration. 

III. Structure of the Unit 
There are four principal strands in Intensive Unit I: expressive arts, basic 
theory of celebration, clinical experience, and reflection and evaluation. The 
ministerial preparation of the student will be integrated in terms of these 
strands through the use of various theological and non-theological disciplines 
and various educational methodologies. 

A. Expressive Arts 

The expressive arts will engage and be engaged by the community 
through two related avenues: a Creative Expression Workshop and an 
Expressive Arts Seminar. 

1. Creative Expression Workshop 

The faculty and students will be members in a learning-celebrating 
community. The process of building such a community will be 
initiated with a five-day founding event at a non-Cluster site. The 
founding event will include a Creative Expression Workshop, which 
will begin with an intensive exposure to some basic human experience 
(e.g., joy, pain, loneliness, hope, grief, etc.) Members of the com- 
munity will then express this experience in significant art forms and 
experience how other artists have expressed it. 

2. Expressive Arts Seminar 

During subsequent weeks the regular activities of the community will 
include an Expressive Arts Seminar in which members will share and 
possess each other's "mini-celebrations" and the work of rep- 
resentative artists. In this seminar members will work with various 
forms of expressive art in accord with their ability, e.g., drama, 
dance, music, painting, sculpture, song, celebrative preaching, pho- 
tography, oral interpretation, creative writing, communications 
media, and staging environment. 

20 



B. Basic Theory of Celebration 

Members of the community will endeavor to lay solid theoretical founda- 
tions for celebration. Other resource persons will be utilized periodi- 
cally. Areas of study include the phenomenology of celebration, symbol- 
ism and celebration, analysis of classic/ contemporary examples of cel- 
ebration, and structure and design of celebration. 

C. Clinical Experience 

Each student will be involved with a group outside the Cluster schools 
for the purpose of: 

1. Witnessing the process by which lived moments come to peak ex- 
pression in celebration in the group (first month), and 

2. Developing-teaching them to move further in celebration experience 
and life-style (last two months). 

D. Reflection and Evaluation 

The community will regularly engage in reflection and evaluation of their 
experiences and further development of their abilities as instigators of 
celebration. 

A project-report indicating integration of celebration theory and skills, as 
well as members' development as artists-interpreters-instigators of 
religious celebration within the community and within the non-Cluster 
groups with which they have worked will be assessed through self- 
evaluation, peer evaluation, and supervisory evaluation at the end of the 
Unit. 

IV. Admission 

Open to students (1) who have completed one or more years of 
theological education; (2) who have some of the following experiences 
and education — at least minimal ability -experience in an area of ex- 
pressive arts, at least two courses in the general field of liturgy and wor- 
ship, and who have experience in actual situations of communal 
celebration — and; (3) who have obtained the approval of the school in 
which they are matriculated. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission 
should register for the Unit during the registration period which will be 
held at each school during the week of February 20-24, 1978. 



CCTS 1-560 CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 



Ruben Armendariz 

Associate Professor of Ministry and 
Director of Latino Studies Program 

McCormick Theological Seminary 
Claude Marie Barbour 

Assistant Professor of World Mission 

Catholic Theological Union 



Spring Quarter, 1978 
2 or 3 Full Courses Credit 
Monday, 9:00 A.M. -3:00 P.M. 
Wednesday, 3:30-9:30 P.M. 
Enrollment limited to 20 
Initial session at CTU 



21 



John Boberg, S.V.D. 

Associate Professor of Mission 

Theology 
Catholic Theological Union 
Albert Pero, Jr. 

Instructor in Religious Education and 

Constructive Theology 
Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago 

I. Rationale 

The church is at the threshold of a new era. The growing thrust toward 
unity on the economic and political planes, the deeper realization of cultural 
pluralism within that unity, and the greater involvement in the struggle for 
human dignity have all given new thrust and direction to the church's task in 
the world today. 

The global scope and character of the problems demand an equal response. It 
is of the greatest importance that Christians of diverse national, racial, class 
and theological backgrounds, perspective and commitments find ways to 
listen to and learn from one another. If American theological education is to 
make creative contributions to such issues as racism, the use and distribution 
of the world's wealth and resources, the struggles for human liberation and 
the development of societal structures which are more open and just, it must 
do so as a community which has learned to reflect and act in an international 
context. 

For some the response will go further. They desire to be persons of dialogue, 
to live a precarious existence between different cultural worlds. They aim to 
spend their lives, or part of them, with people of another culture, discovering 
ways to think and work together in Christ about the fundamental problems 
which confront the entire human family in relation to peace, justice and sur- 
vival . 

II. Nature of the Unit 

The concentration has a double major thrust which will serve the needs and 
goals of a wide variety of students. On the one hand, it will give high 
priority to those students who desire to work or study in another cultural en- 
vironment and will help them acquire beginning levels of competence for ef- 
fective communication in cultures and subcultures other than their own. 

At the same time, the concentration will provide a wider range of students 
the opportunity to experience in a unique way the cultural assumptions and 
limits of their theological thinking, and to lay the foundation for a broader 
international, interracial and ecumenical understanding, concern and com- 
mitment both in their theological education as well as in their further 
ministry. 

III. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of Intensive Unit I include the following: 

A. to sensitize students to the diversity of cultural expression; 

B. to assist students to develop skills in the analysis of culture and com- 
munication and to acquire a beginning competence in cross-cultural com- 
munication; 

22 



C. to lay a foundation for students' understanding of, concern for, and 
cooperation in issues of international scope and character; 

D. to help students to interpret their experience to the wider church in order 
to contribute to an international perspective on mission and ministry. 

IV. Structure of the Unit 

There are three principal components in Intensive Unit I: basic theory of 
culture and communication, field placements, integrative discussions ("de- 
briefings"). (Within the scheduled activities students enrolled for two full 
courses credit may negotiate appropriately reduced involvement.) 

A. Basic Theory (Four weeks: March 27- April 21) 

The theoretical presentations will focus on such matters as understanding 
the ways in which cultural factors influence experiencing and sym- 
bolization, thereby influencing the ways in which communication is 

given and received; understanding the nature of any culture through a 
representative examination of selected contrasting cultures and sub- 
cultures in the light of cultural anthropological perspectives; un- 
derstanding the theological issues involved in the cultural conditioning of 
all experience and symbolization; understanding the nature of the com- 
munication process from theological, psychological and sociological per- 
spectives; and understanding what it means theologically to com- 
municate the meaning of the Christian faith. 

Such understanding will be addressed through the following topics: 

1. Culture: Nature and Origin; Enculturation — Ethnocentrism — Preju- 
dice; Culture Dynamics: Persistance and Change 

2. My Culture: Historical Background, Common Characteristics 

3. Communication Theory: Verbal — dialogue; Non-verbal 

4. Obstacles to Communication: Historical; Cultural 

5. Communication of the Gospel: 
a. Why: Theology of Mission 

b.How: Evangelization: Dialogue (Religious); Witness; Worship 

6. Global Awareness: Peace and Justice; Population Growth; Develop- 
ment 

7. Introduction to specific cultures of field placements. 

B. Field Placements (Three weeks: April 24-May 12) 

The field placement is an integral part of the Unit. It is designed to offer 
students an opportunity to practice and develop skills and to test theories 
of cross-cultural communication in an authentic or simulated cross- 
cultural life situation. 

During the 1978 Spring term, the type of field placement especially 
recommended will be a three- week intensive "live-in" experience. Other 
types of field placement will be available to those who are able to com- 
mit themselves to some specific cross-cultural situation for at least two 
academic quarters. These latter placements would continue throughout 
the Spring quarter, but with greater intensity during April 24-May 12. 
Recent placements have included the following: 

1. East Africa 

2. Chicano-Indian : on location in rural New Mexico 

3. Latino: in Chicago area 

23 



4. Black: in Chicago area 

All field placements embody the following features: 

1. an intensive community live-in experience in a cross-cultural situa- 
tion; 

2. an opportunity for the practice of cross-cultural skills; 

3. planned supervision and guidance; 

4. availability of a peer group, reflector group or other support group. 
C. Integrative Discussions (Two weeks: May 15-26) 

Following the three-weeks of intensive field placement, students will 
engage in a two-week, post-field "de-briefing" period during which their 
cross-cultural field experiences will be reported on, analyzed and 
critically evaluted from the standpoint of personal learning and growth. 

Every student will be expected to have kept a complete diary (log) of 
field experiences. 

A clear expectation of the "de-briefing" period is that all students will 
evaluate and process their field experience in such a way as to make con- 
crete plans for application in terms of ministry. These plans may be of an 
interpretive or vocational nature. 

V. Admission to the Unit 

Open to students who have completed one or more years of theological 
education and who have obtained the approval of the school in which they 
are matriculated. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admissions should 
register for the Unit during the registration period which will be held at each 
school during the week of February 20-24, 1978. 



CCTS 1-580 INTERPRETATION AND COMMUNICATION: 
TEACHING : INTENSIVE UNIT I 






Nature of Unit < Not offered 1977 " 78) 

Intensive Unit I is designed for advanced students who wish to become in- 
creasingly competent in (1) understanding and integrating basic orientations 
to the substance and style(s) of interpreting and communicating Christian 
faith which are operative in their own life situations and in those of represen- 
tative groups with whom the church engages in ministry; (2) interpreting in 
their historical and contemporary contexts selected dimensions of the Judeo- 
Christian tradition and the modern world which are relevant to such life 
situations; and (3) communicating, and assisting others to communicate, ef- 
fectively through teaching in the light of such understandings and interpretive 
abilities. The concentration is intended to be of value to students who plan to 
engage in a variety of teaching ministries, e.g. in local churches as pastors or 
directors of educational programs; in public or parochial schools as teachers 
or superivsors of teachers; in institutions of higher education as campus 
ministers or professors; and in organizations and agencies of various kinds as 
educational consultants. 

The Unit consists of one intensive quarter of involvement for which students 
will receive two or three full courses credit. With the approval of the 

24 



respective institutions in which they are matriculated, students who are in- 
volved in the Unit may enroll in one or two additional courses. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of the Unit include the following: 

A. to assist students to enhance their understandings of the nature and 
dimensions of the hermeneutical task in relation to the life situations of 
people, to the contemporary world, and to the Judeo-Christian tradition 
in light of pertinent philosophical, theological, scientific and artistic per- 
spectives; 

B. to assist students to develop a growing understanding and appreciation 
of (1) the predicaments and possibilities which characterize the life 
situations of individuals and groups, (2) the resources of the Judeo- 
Christian tradition and of other sources of insight which are relevant to 
such predicaments and possibilities, and (3) the teaching-learning theories 
and methods which may be employed to relate these resources to the 
human predicaments and possibilities; 

C. to enable students to function effectively and collegially in enhancing 
specific ministries of interpretation and communication through 
teaching, and in assisting others to function in similar manner; 

D. to assist students to integrate (1) their understandings of the substance 
and style(s) which are appropriate to the relevant interpretation and 
communication of Christian faith in relation to human predicaments and 
possibilities with (2) their personal and professional self-understanding 
and functioning. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are three components in Intensive Unit I: an interpretive seminar, 
supervised ministry placements, and an integrative seminar. 

A. Interpretive Seminar 

In the interpretive seminar students and faculty will collegially develop 
teaching-learning activities and, as deemed appropriate, covenants which 
bring their several unique concerns and competencies to bear upon the 
achievement of the general aims of the Unit — particularly those 
represented in A and B above. However, in order to insure the 
availability of certain teaching-learning activities and resources which 
participants may choose to employ but which could not with certainty be 
developed after the Unit has begun, the teaching team has taken the 
initiative to develop two broad sets of complementary options (and their 
correlative networks of resources) which will be discussed fully by all 
Unit participants before final decisions are made regarding their adoption 
and implementation. 

If the first broad option is adopted and implemented, early in the Unit 
students will be assisted by the teaching team to acquire familiarity with 
and experience in employing fundamental principles and methods of 
identifying, analyzing, and evaluating basic orientations to the substance 
and style of interpreting and communicating Christian faith through 
teaching. Special attention may be given to acquiring such familiarity 
and experience through an exploration of how these orientations are em- 
bodied, for example, by Unit participants, by persons or periods of 

25 



historic significance in participants' denominations and/or other groups, 
and by certain contemporary Chicagoland churches of various 
denominations and races. In carrying out such explorations through 
several observation visits to the selected churches, whose ministries are 
characterized by unique creativities, consistencies, or constituencies, 
students will be assisted by local clergy and laity in identifying, 
analyzing, and evaluating their respective orientations to content and 
method of interpretation and communication of Christian faith through 
teaching. 

B. Supervised Ministry Placements 

The supervised ministry placements are designed to foster collegial 
realization of the several general aims of the Unit — especially that 
represented in C above. 

If the second of the previously-mentioned broad options which have 
been developed by the teaching team is adopted and implemented, 
student teams (comprised of several members each) will be assisted to 
negotiate placements in settings in which they will serve during the Unit. 
For most student teams, it is anticipated that such placement will be in a 
local church (or ecumenical and interracial cluster of churches) in the 
vicinity of Hyde Park or Oak Brook — Lemont. 

It is not contemplated that student teams will be assigned to provide staff 
leadership for existing educational programs of the church /cluster. 
Rather, team members will serve as educational resource persons or con- 
sultants, together with clergy and laity in the respective settings, in a 
joint endeavor (1) to identify and to assess the effectiveness of the orien- 
tation^) to the substance and style of interpreting and communicating 
Christian faith which are currently employed in selected teaching-learn- 
ing situations, (2) to identify critical needs which can be addressed 
through enhancing the substance and style of such interpretation and 
communication, (3) to design one or more significant teaching-learning 
events to address such needs; and (4) to provide appropriate leadership 
and/ or direction in carrying out such event(s). The number of such events 
to be designed and led or directed by each student team will be deter- 
mined by consultation among the student team, the teaching team, and 
the church/cluster representatives. 

As their respective schedules permit, and as the respective placement 
situations indicate, members of the teaching team will participate on 
location with student teams in carrying out the foregoing functions. 
However, it is expected that during the course of the Unit a member of 
the teaching team will participate appropriately in such functions in 
relation to at least one of each student teams' teaching-learning events. 

Through consultative and supervisory relationships with student peers, 
faculty, and church/cluster clergy and laity, student team members will 
have opportunity to develop skills in evaluating process, product, and 
program dimensions of their collective experience. Such dimensions may 
include, respectively, (1) assessment of the planning and interaction 
among themselves and between themselves and those with whom they 
are involved in the respective placement settings; (2) assessment of the 

26 



respective teaching-learning events; and (3) assessment of the con- 
tributions of the Unit-as-a-whole to the equipping of students for in- 
terpretive and communicative ministries through teaching and also to the 
enhancing of the respective churches'/clusters' ministries of this kind. 

Students who wish to explore the possibility of a year-long placement in 
a setting appropriate to the Unit, or who wish to explore the possibility 
of a non-church placement during the Unit should contact the teaching 
team early in the Fall quarter. 

C. Integrative Seminar 

In the integrative seminar students will have opportunity to pursue 
realization of the several general aims of the course — particularly that 
represented in item D above. More specifically, it will provide occasion 
for students to engage in processes of further unifying conceptual, 
emotional, and behavioral dimensions of experience which bear upon the 
development of their personal and professional self-understandings and 
competencies as interpreters and communicators of Christian faith 
through teaching. By such means as may commend themselves to Unit 
participants, effort will be made to draw together experiences in the in- 
tegrative seminar (including observation visits to selected churches) and 
in the respective placement settings. Among such possible means is 
student utilization of the teaching team as resource persons and con- 
sultants in planning, implementing, and evaluating the teaching-learning 
event(s) in which the several teams are involved in their respective 
placement settings. Case studies, audio and video recordings, and in- 
dividual and team evaluation procedures such as those noted earlier will 
also be available to provide constructive feedback and guidance from a 
variety of complementary perspectives for continuing development and 
integration. 

IV. Admission to the Unit 

Open to students who have completed two or more years of theological 
education and who have obtained the approval of the school in which they 
are matriculated. 

Open also to students with backgrounds in theological and educational 
disciplines and/or with teaching experience who have completed one year of 
theological education and who have obtained the approval both of the 
school in which they are matriculated and of the Interpretation and Com- 
munication teaching team. Approval of the teaching team should be 
requested through an application form which may be obtained from the of- 
fice of the registrar at each school. 



CCTS 1-570 INTERPRETATION AND COMMUNICATION: 
PREACHING: INTENSIVE UNIT I 

Manfred T. Branch 
Spring Quarter, 1978 Associate Professor of New 

2 Full Courses Credit Testament Interpretation 

Thursday, 3:00-9:00 P.M. Northern Baptist Theological 

Enrollment limited to 20 Seminarv 

Initial session at NBTS 

27 



James A. Fischer, CM. 

Professor of Biblical Studies 
DeAndreis Institute of Theology 

LeRoy E. Kennel 

Professor of Communication 
Bethany Theological Seminary 

I. Nature of Unit 

Intensive Unit I is designed to enable students to achieve competence and ef- 
fectiveness in the preaching task (1) through the interpretation of biblical 
foundations, theological traditions, and contemporary events and human ex- 
periences; and (2) through the functional integration of the interpretive 
task in the context of sermon formulation and proclamation. 

The Unit consists of one intensive quarter of involvement for which 
students will receive two full courses credit. With the approval of the respec- 
tive institutions in which they are matriculated, students who are in- 
volved in the Unit may also enroll in one or two additional courses. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of Intensive Unit I are : 

A. to assist students to integrate the exegeses of Scripture and theological 
traditions with the exegesis of contemporary realities;: 

B. to assist students to clarify and enrich their involvement and iden- 
tification with both the role and content of preaching and the means by 
which it occurs, such as critical analysis of content and reflection upon 
the processes by which preaching happens; 

C. to assist the intensive-mix of students and faculty to become a 
laboratory-model in which the agony and glory of preaching is ex- 
perienced. 

III. Structural Components 

There are five principal components in Intensive Unit I. The scholarly and 
professional preparation of the student will be integrated in terms of these 
components through the use of various theological and functional disciplines 
and various educational methodologies. 

A. Modeling of and participating in the exegeses of Scripture and theology, 
and the exegesis of contemporary human experience; 

B. Researching ways of analyzing Scripture, dynamics by which traditions 
shape theology, and methods of sermon development; 

C. Evaluating critically actual occasions of preaching by students in the 
classroom and in the parish and by selected preachers in the Chicago 
area; 

D. Exploring possibilities of various forms in which proclamation happens, 
such as story telling, conversation, prophetic confrontation, and media; 
and 

E. Ongoing supervision by participating faculty, student peers, and lay per- 
sons. 

IV. Admission to the Unit 

Open to students (1) who have completed one or more years of theological 

28 



!j 



education; (2) who have completed at least two courses in biblical studies, 
two courses in history and theological thought, and one course in preaching; 
and (3) who have obtained the approval of the school in which they are 
matriculated. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission should 
register for the Unit during the registration period which will be held at each 
school during the week of February 20-24, 1978. 



29 



CLUSTER PASTORAL CARE 
AND COUNSELING PROGRAM 



I. Program Characteristics 

The Cluster program in pastoral care and counseling is cooperatively- 
resourced by the nine member institutions of the Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools. Intended primarily for persons seeking the Doctor of 
Ministry degree in pastoral care and counseling through member seminaries, 
the Cluster program is also open to advanced candidates for certain other 
degrees and for non-degree continuing education. 

Through collaborative planning, staffing, and administration by the 
several schools, participants enjoy access (1) to one of the nation's most 
distinguished ecumenical constellations of teachers and researchers in 
pastoral care and counseling, and (2) to an unusually broad range of super- 
vised clinical opportunities sponsored by outstanding religious, health, and 
social service agencies. 

The Cluster program seeks to equip present and future ministers to func- 
tion effectively in various professional roles and institutional settings which 
require particular competence in the theory and practice of pastoral care and 
counseling. The program presupposes or provides a general base in the in- 
terdisciplinary foundations essential to all forms of ministry . Advanced 
specialized study and service in academic and clinical contexts is integrated 
with this general base. 

Participants in the Cluster program in pastoral care and counseling will 
take courses in metropolitan Chicago in order that, through regular contact 
with faculty and supervisors, the academic and clinical goals of the program 
can be optimally realized. Participants may enroll in the program on a part- 
time or full-time basis. 

The Cluster program in pastoral care and counseling is designed to be com- 
patible with participants' concurrent pursuit of training for professional Cer- 
tification by the American Association of Pastoral Counselors, the 
Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, the American Association of 
Marriage and Family Counselors, and accrediting agencies representing cer- 
tain other areas of competence which are of similar concern to an increasing 
number of religious professionals. 

II. Program Components 

The Cluster program in pastoral care and counseling consists of advanced 
theoretical and clinical components. 

A. Core Seminars 

The theoretical component consists of a three-quarter sequence of core 
seminars team taught by faculty from participating schools. A sequence 
such as the following will be offered each year : 

• Pastoral Care: History and Theology (Fall) 

John W. Stettner (McCormick Theological Seminary) 
Thomas More Newbold, C.P. (Catholic Theological Union) 

• Pastoral Care : Personality Theories and Therapies (Winter) 
Paul R. Swanson (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago) 
Carl D. Schneider (Meadville/Lombard Theological School) 

30 



• Pastoral Care and the Christian Community (Spring) 
Philip A. Anderson (Chicago Theological Seminary) 
Byron P. Royer (Bethany Theological Seminary) 

For course descriptions consult Ministry Studies: Pastoral Care and 
Spiritual Direction offerings: CCTS M-602A, B, C. 

B. Supervised Practica 

The clinical component consists of supervised practica of nine months 
duration in settings affording opportunity for pastoral care and coun- 
seling ministry related to one or more of the following areas of com- 
petence : 

• Care of congregations (interpreting, enhancing, and integrating each 
ministerial function within the congregation from a pastoral care 
perspective) 

• marriage and family counseling 

• individual and group psychotherapy (including perspectives therein af- 

forded by psychoanalysis, Gestalt, transactional analysis, psycho- 
synthesis, and other points of view) 

• geriatric issues 

• alcoholism rehabilitation 

• minority group issues 

• religion and medicine 

• community mental health 

• clinical pastoral education 

Students may develop case material for supervision either in the 
clinical setting of the practicum or in their own work setting. The prac- 
ticum will typically consist of a weekly case conference, a weekly session 
of individual supervision, and didactic sessions as arranged by the super- 
visor. 

For course descriptions consult Ministry Studies: Supervised Ministry 
offerings: CCTS M-620A, B, C through CCTS M-638A, B, C. 

Centers currently approved by the Cluster for supervised practica in- 
clude the following: 

• Alcoholism Treatment Program, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, 
Northwestern University Medical School 

• Billings Hospital, The University of Chicago 

• Center for Religion and Psychotherapy of Chicago 

• Christ Hospital 

• Edgewater-Uptown Community Mental Health Center 

• Pastoral Counseling Ministry Institute 

• Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center 

• Wholistic Health Center 

It is anticipated that other specialized areas of competence and other 
centers will be developed in the future. 

III. Program Participants 

The Cluster program in pastoral care and counseling is offered to four 
groups of participants, who may selectively employ its theoretical and 
clinical components to achieve their respective learning goals within 
guidelines established by the participating schools in which they are enrolled. 
A. Second Professional Degree Candidates 

31 



Ministers with three or more years of experience who are seeking the 
D.Min. in pastoral care and counseling as a second professional degree 
through Chicago Theological Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago, McCormick Theological Seminary, or Meadville/Lombard 
Theological School may utilize components of the Cluster program in 
completing the required one year of full-time study (or its equivalent in 
part-time study) in residence beyond a first professional degree (M.Div.). 

B. First Professional Degree Candidates 

Advanced ministerial candidates seeking the D.Min. in pastoral care 
and counseling as a first professional degree through Chicago Theological 
Seminary or Meadville/Lombard Theological School may utilize 
components of the Cluster program in completing the required four years 
of full-time study (or its equivalent in part-time study) beyond an un- 
dergraduate baccalaureate degree. 

C. Other Degree Candidates 

A limited number of advanced students seeking other graduate 
professional or academic degrees (e.g., M.Div., S.T.M., Th.D.) through 
any Cluster school may utilize components of the Cluster program in 
pastoral care and counseling as elective options in such degrees. 

D. Non-degree Candidates 

A limited number of ministers with three or more years of experience 
who are seeking non-degree continuing education through any Cluster 
school may utilize components of the Cluster program in pastoral care 
and counseling in achieving their individual learning goals. 

IV. Additional Options 

Significant complementary resources strengthen and enhance the Cluster 
program in pastoral care and counseling. 

A. The Cluster Schools 

Participants in the Cluster program enjoy tuition-free cross-registration 
privileges in all curricular fields of the consortium's nine member 
schools, including access to approximately 40 current offerings in pastoral 
care and counseling. For additional course descriptions consult Ministry 
Studies: Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction offerings. 

B. The University of Chicago 

Most participants in the Cluster program in pastoral care and coun- 
seling may enroll in two concurrent courses for the price of one at the 
Divinity School and other graduate or professional schools of the 
University of Chicago. 

C. The Chicago Theological Institute 

Most participants may also avail themselves of tuition-free cross- 
registration privileges in the five member schools of the Chicago 
Theological Institute: Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, North 
Park Theological Seminary, Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and St. Mary of the Lake Seminary. 



32 



CLUSTER INTERINSTITUTIONAL 
TEAM-TAUGHT COURSES 

In addition to the previously described Areas of Concentration, the Cluster also 
offers team-taught courses which draw in an integrative, but less intensive, manner 
upon the resources of its member schools and the metropolitan Chicago area. 
These courses involve ecumenical and, frequently, interdisciplinary teaching teams, 
and are characterized by concern for students' personal-professional development 
and by concern to draw imaginatively upon the resources of significant persons, 
programs, and settings in the wider community. 

Such courses are especially designed to enable students to experience the 
enriching and stimulating give-and-take of dialogue and service in various 
ecumenical contexts without requiring the larger investment of time and com- 
mitment which are necessitated by the Cluster Areas of Concentration. 

Admission is open to students through the regular cross-registration procedures 
which are operative among the Cluster schools. 

1977-78 Offerings* 

CCTS E-401 



FALL 
CCTS B-411 
Symbol and Myth in the Bible 

Modern biblical studies, especially text-, source-, 
form- and redaction- criticism, have succeeded 
in expressing many historical and literary aspects 
of the Bible. But they have failed to express a 
religious appreciation of the text in its symbolic 
and mythological depths. In this course we will 
address this issue by critically examining the 
other major approaches to the Bible, by ex- 
ploring fundamental experiences of appreciation 
in our culture, by interpreting biblical texts in 
post-critical religious fashion, by formulating 
the interpretive principles of this post-critical 
appreciation, and by applying those principles 
in practice. Students are expected to have com- 
pleted basic 300-level courses in Bible and 
theology. Their responsibilities will include 
assigned readings, personal reflection, active 
participation in discussion and an original piece 
of work. 

TTh 10:45-12:30 Fall 

David C. Reeves 

Associate Professor of New Testament 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
William G. Thompson, S.J. 
Associate Professor of Biblical Theology 
Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 



Theological Assessment on Contrasting Human 
Rights Traditions 

A critical assessment of the complementarity 
and contrast of American civil religion's focus 
on personal civil rights and of the focus of 
Marxist forms of liberation theologies on social 
and economic rights, from biblical and 
theological perspectives. The course will be 
taught by an ecumenical faculty team related to 
the Faith and Order Commission of the 
National Council of Churches. Class sessions 
will be held at Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary, 2121 Sheridan Road, Evanston. 

Intensive: Sept. 30 - Oct. 1; Fall 

Nov. 4-5; Dec. 2-3. 
F 2:30-5 :30 pm, S 9 am -4 pm 
James E. Will 

Professor of Systematic Theology 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
Agnes Cunningham, S.S.C.M. 

Associate Professor of Church History 
St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 
Donald E. Miller 

Professor of Christian Education and Ethics 
Bethany Theological Seminary 
John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 
Associate Professor of Ethics 
Catholic Theological Union 
V. Bruce Rigdon 
Professor of Church History 
McCormick Theological Seminary 

Unless indicated in parenthesis following the course number, each entry is a Full Course valued at 3 
or 4 quarter hours credit. 



33 



CCTS M-355 

. , ■ . .■ ■ 

Ministry Lab : The Sick 

These courses are basic ones in the ministry of 
caring, which includes "laboratory" experience 
with a particular population as well as a 
seminar for reflection and discussion. The course 
will be held off campus and may involve staff 
persons in the locale of the course. The purpose 
is to explore the meaning of pastoral care with a 
specific group of people, which involves deepen- 
ing self-knowledge on the part of the "pastor" 
as well as learning more specifically the needs of 
the persons the pastor seeks to serve. 

F 2-4 Fall 

John W. Stettner 

Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 

McCormick Theological Seminary 
Homer U. Ashby, Jr. 

Counseling Associate 

Center for Religion and Psychotherapy of 
Chicago 

CCTS M-602A 

Pastoral Care: History and Theology 

This quarter will focus on the development of a 
professional understanding of pastoral theology. 
The history of pastoral care in the church will 
be considered, as well as the place of pastoral 
care in the church today and issues concerning 
pastoral identity. The relationship between 
theological disciplines and psychological 
disciplines will also be dealt with. There will be 
assigned reading, lectures, and seminar 
discussion. 

F 9-12 Fall 

John W. Stettner 

Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 

McCormick Theological Seminary 
Thomas More Newbold, C.P. 

Professor Emeritus of Pastoral Theology 

Catholic Theological Union 

WINTER 
CCTS E-451 
Christian Ethics 

The aim of this course is to investigate the 
Christian approach to the main social issues of 
today. Consideration will be given to the 
biblical and theological basis for social action. 
Central social issues, including the socio- 
economic and political structure, personal and 
civil rights, war and peace, labor and 
management and interpersonal relations, will be 
studied. Special attention will be given to 
minority rights and social justice. Field trips to 




social institutions will be included. 

M WF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Winter 

Warren C. Young 

Professor of Theology and Christian Mission 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

John O. Hodges 

CCTS M-473 

Mass Media and the Liberation Message 

An analysis of contemporary media's power to 
transmit and inform, to influence and motivate 
values. The church's theology of human 
liberation will be employed to evaluate such 
media as film, television, radio, print and ad- 
vertising and their impact upon the church's 
theology of human liberation, including such 
areas as racial and women's issues and stereo- 
types. Course approaches include seminars, film 
screenings (such as Bunuel's "Virdiana"), at- 
tendance at Chicago's Midwest Film Conference 
and selected projects and productions. 

Th3:30-6 Winter 

LeRoy E. Kennel 

Professor of Communications 

Bethany Theological Seminary 
Charles S. Spivey 

Senior Pastor 

Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal 
Church 

CCTS T-518 

Seminar on Black Worship and Liturgical 

Tradition 

An exploration of the potential for enrichment 
of the Western liturgical heritage by the Black 
experience of worship. Special attention will be 
given to basic principles of liturgical prayer as 
they are operative in Black worship and to the 
questions of liturgical "adaptation" called for in 
development of worship patterns truly Black 
and truly Catholic. 

Th 2-4:30 Winter 

Ralph A. Keifer 

Associate Professor of Liturgy 

Catholic Theological Union 
Jeremiah A. Wright 

Pastor 

Trinity United Church of Christ 

CCTS M-602B 

Pastoral Care: Personality Theories and 

Therapies 

Consideration of different theories of per- 
sonality and their implications for counseling 
and therapy. We will seek to develop a critical 
understanding of the emphases and an- 



34 



throplogies represented by the various schools, 
together with their respective philosophical 
presuppositions and theological correlations, 
and endeavor to understand their relevance for 
counseling and pastoral care. Case studies will 
be used. 

F 9-12 Winter 

Paul R. Swanson 

Professor of Pastoral Care 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
Carl D. Schneider 

Assistant Professor of Religion and 
Personality 

Meadville/Lombard Theological School 

CCTS 1-425 

Can The Church be Christum? 

This course is designed to explore and assess the 
classical tensions between private, communal, 
and institutional understandings of the Christian 
religion as these are embodied in current ex- 
perience. Case studies, recent theological 
declarations, materials from the New 
Testament, sociology, and systematic theology 
will be examined. The goal is a fresh discovery 
of the relations between Christ, the Church, and 
a self-understanding of the Christian life as 
ministry. Student responsibilities will include 
assigned readings, active participation in class 
discussions, and a paper. Prerequisites: in- 
troductory courses in New Testament and 
systematic theology. 

W2-5 Winter 

John E. Burkhart 

Professor of Systematic Theology 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
William G. Thompson, S.J. 
Associate Professor of Biblical Theology 
Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 

SPRING 

CCTS B-401 

The Book of Psalms 

Select psalms will be studied from each literary 
or liturgical category with a view to their 
language and form, theology and devotion. 
Their lasting worth to Israel, the New 
Testament church and to us will be explored. 
Initial session at NBTS. 

Th 2-4:30 Spring 

Reidar B. Bjornard 

Professor of Old Testament Interpretation 

Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 
Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P. 

Professor of Old Testament Studies 

Catholic Theological Union 



CCTS T-472 

Communicating the Religious Message in an 

Age of Science 

In this course the following goals will guide the 
study: (1) to introduce students to theologies 
and theologians which seek explicity to address 
the contemporary scientific and technological 
worldview; (2) to acquaint students with basic 
work in philosophy of science and theological 
methodology which are relevant to such 
theological address; and (3) to assist students 
who are already familiar with matters represent- 
ed by goals (1) and (2) further to advance their 
understandings in these and/or related areas. In 
approaching such goals two methods will be 
emphasized: (1) individual tutorial sessions 
which will help the student to advance at 
his/her own pace, to deal with new per- 
spectives, and to prepare a research paper; and 
(2) seminar sessions which will deal with 
readings corresponding to the first two goals 
mentioned above. Readings in theology may in- 
clude issues such as those raised in Peacock's 
Science and the Christian Experiment, Teilhard 
de Chardin's Phenomenon of Man, Cobb's A 
Christian Natural Theology, as well as those 
treated in selected works of the convenors. 
Readings in the methodology and philosophy of 
science may include issues such as those dealt 
with in Gilkey's Religion and the Scientific 
Future, Barbour's Issues in Science and Religion, 
Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions 
and Margenau's Open Vistas. Prerequisite: at 
least two courses in systematic or philosophical 
theology, and approval of the convenors. Scien- 
tific background helpful but not necessary. 
Th 2-5 Spring 

Ralph Wendell Burhoe 

Director 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and 
Science 
George A. Riggan 

Visiting Professor of Theology 

Meadville/Lombard Theological School 

CCTS T-572 

Advanced Seminar in Theology and the 

Sciences 

The seminar is designed as a forum for papers 
by theological and scientific faculty and ad- 
vanced students. It seeks to move toward a 
theology which is solidly grounded in the best 
of today's scientific understandings and which 
at the same time may be dynamic in eliciting 
religious feelings and behavior characteristic of 



35 



the best Christian tradition whereby persons are 
led to appreciate the reality of God's sovereign- 
ty and grace which are manifest in environing 
nature and in human forms, and to find thereby 
a new meaning, hope, sense of duty, and 
beatific perspective in God's realm. 



Each weekly session will be the occasion for the 
presentation and critical evaluation of one or 
more papers exploring an interpretation of 
historic religious doctrines in the light of the 
sciences. Among the historic religious doctrines 
that may be interpreted are such primary 
Christian categories as God, Creation, Human 
Nature, Sin, Salvation, Church, Revelation and 
Mission to the World. No specific topic is ex- 
cluded per se, no matter how out of theological 
favor it may presently be or how seemingly in- 
congruous with recent secular doctrine. For the 
seminar, the light of the sciences will be sought 
primarily through focus upon the so-called 
"hard" sciences that have provided a new world 
view or "metaphysics." These sciences include 
physics, biology, sociobiology, and 
psychobiology. However, this primary focus 
does not exclude perspectives from the 
psychosocial sciences, which will also be heavily 
involved. At the core of its activity the seminar 
will explore and test a basic hypothesis: that 
recent scientific information suggests that 
evolving psychobiological and sociobiological 
systems require religions as value cores, that the 
traditional religion of each culturetype has been 
selected for the same kinds of life-producing 
wisdom as have been selected in the genotypes 
for all animal organisms and societies, and that 
all of this is generated and selected by a creative 
system of dynamic reality far transcending any 
of its creatures. 



Admission for credit: While the seminar is ex- 
pected primarily to involve the presentation of 
papers by faculty and advanced students, ad- 
mission for credit is also open to other students 
whose proposals for a paper to be presented and 
whose background in theology and science is 
deemed satisfactory by the convenors. High per- 
formance in CCTS T-472 may be deemed suf- 
ficient for admission, and capacity to discuss 
critically and to advance themes such as those 
published in Zygon, Journal of Religion and 
Science would provide excellent grounding for 
any participants in the seminar. 



Admission without credit: Participation is also 
open to Cluster students and faculty who have a 
concern to become more informed about and/or 
to participate in this research and development 
program without obligating themselves to meet 
the specific course requirements. Such persons 
should inform one of the convenors in advance 
of their intention to participate in this manner. 

Requirements for students taking the seminar 
for credit will be (1) to present an original paper 
of some 20-30 doublespaced pages (during one 
of the last five weeks of the quarter) on a topic 
approved by the convenors and to defend it suc- 
cessfully during its discussion, and (2) to present 
a one- or two-page critical and constructive 
analysis of the proceedings of each of the other 
papers and discussions in the seminar sessions. 
Sessions held at home of Dr. Burhoe, 1524 E. 
59th St., Chicago. 

Tu 7-10 pm Spring 

Ralph Wendell Burhoe 

Director 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and 
Science 
George A. Riggan 

Visiting Professor of Theology 

Meadville/Lombard Theological School 

CCTS T-559 

Developments in Modern Theology, Protestant 

and Catholic 

Using a discussion-group format involving the 
active participation of all members, this course 
will investigate such fundamental Christian 
themes as the relationship of religion and 
Christianity, God and his providence and grace, 
Christ and the church, in selected texts from 
such theologians as Schleiermacher, Ritschl, 
Harnack, Loisy, Blondel, Barth, Tillich, Rahner, 
Pannenberg, Metz. Enrollment limited to 14; 
admission by approval of instructor. 

MW 1:30-3 Spring 

Carl E. Braaten 

Professor of Systematic Theology 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
Roger D. Haight, S.J. 

Assistant Professor of Systematic Theology 
Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 

CCTS M-501 

Symposium in Psychology and Religion 

This course will focus on some person, topic, or 
issue of current interest in the broad field of 
psychology and religion, and will be different 
each time it is offered. Instructors from Cluster 



36 



schools, experts on pertinent subjects, or 
representatives of other religious groups may be 
involved. The particular focus for the course will 
be announced at least one quarter in advance. 
There are no specific prerequisites for the 
course, but it is assumed that students will have 
had other courses in the field. 

W 2-4 Spring 

John W. Stettner 

Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Ouster Pastoral Care Faculty 

CCTS M-602C 

Pastoral Care and the Christian Community 

An exploration of the nature of community and 
its healing power with reference to theological, 
biblical, psychological and therapeutic theories 
and practice. An experience of the house church 
process will allow members to participate in a 
learning-transforming community and to ex- 
plore Christian community as a vehicle for the 
mutual care of souls. Each student will be asked 
to formulate his or her own basic change 
theory — conditions, processes, goals and out- 
comes. 

F 9-12 Spring 

Philip A. Anderson 



Professor of Pastoral Theology 
Chicago Theological Seminary 
Byron P. Royer 

Professor of Pastoral Psychology 
Bethany Theological Seminary 

CCTS M-409 (2 QH) 

Church Strategies for Changing Communities 

In metropolitan America, almost every com- 
munity is in transition, from the racial changes 
in the center of the cities, to the rural suburban 
transition on the growing edge, including all the 
aging of communities in between. The course 
will study cases and visit places of transition to 
determine the causes and patterns of changing 
communities. Special attention will be given to 
the positive role of the church in community 
change, and to the negative consequences of in- 
decision in the midst of change. Open to pastors 
and laypersons as well as students. 

Tu 4-6 Spring 

Carl S. Dudley 

Professor of Church and Community 

McCormick Theological Seminary 
Alvin Bridges 

Executive Director 

Associated Urban Ministries 

Presbytery of Chicago 



37 



CLUSTER INTER-CAMPUS COURSES 

A continuing concern of the Cluster is to enrich the teaching-learning ex- 
periences of students and faculty from each of its member institutions. The Cluster 
therefore seeks to enable students to have increased access to outstanding teachers 
and courses and to groups of students which they would otherwise be unlikely to 
encounter. The Cluster likewise seeks to enable faculty members to participate in 
rewarding teaching relationships with students and colleagues who represent 
traditions and perspectives not customarily encountered in their own institutions. 

A special curricular structure, known as "Cluster Inter-Campus Courses" has 
been created to encourage and facilitate such interchange, especially between urban 
and suburban member schools. Several outstanding electives which are representa- 
tive of various disciplines and heritages in the Cluster are offered at locations which 
constitute an equitable distribution of travel time among the participating students. 
Each course is scheduled to meet only once a week and to avoid rush-hour traffic. 
The first session of each course is held on the campus of the designated instructor. 
Thereafter the number of students enrolled from the respective seminaries provides 
the basis upon which each class will work out an equitable determination regard- 
ing the location and number of future weekly sessions. Such a principle of 
operation permits the location at which each Cluster Inter-Campus Course is of- 
fered to be highly responsive to the level of interest and initiative of students from 
the respective schools. 

Enrollment in all Cluster Inter-Campus Courses is open to students through the 
regular cross-registration procedures which are operative among the Cluster 
schools. 



1977-78 Offerings' 



FALL 



JSTC T-483 

Everlasting Life After Death 

The course is mainly concerned with these basic 
questions: Will men actually have life after 
death? What connection is there between a 
man's life before death and his life after death? 
Does a man have life immediately after death 
and does this life continue in an interim state 
that perdures until the general judgment and 
what kind of life is this? Does a man go on 
living endlessly after the general resurrection 
and what kind of life does he have in this final 
state? Textbook: Everlasting Life After Death 
(Alba House). Initial session at JSTC. 
Fortman Th 1:30-3:15 Fall 

JSTC T-549 

Rahner's Theology of the Spiritual Life I 
This course is a series of lectures which treat of 
Rahner's Theology of the Spiritual Life. The 
following articles, which are to be found in the 
various volumes of Theological Investigations, 



will be treated. (1) Reflections on the Problem 
of the Gradual Ascent to Christian Perfection, 
III, (2) Thoughts on the Theology of Christmas, 
III, (3) Reflections on the Theology of Renun- 
ciation, III, (4) The Passion and Asceticism, III, 
(5) The Church of the Saints, III, (6) Some 
Thoughts on a Good Intention, III, (7) The 
Dogma of the Immaculate Conception in our 
Spiritual Life, III, (8) The Comfort of Time, III, 
(9) The Eucharist and Suffering, III, (10) The 
Renewal of Priestly Ordination, III, (11) The 
Meaning of Frequent Confession of Devotion, 
III, (12) Problems Concerning Confession, III, 
(13) The Apostolate of Prayer, III, (14) A 
Spiritual Dialogue at Evening: on Sleep, Prayer 
and other Subjects, III, (15) Priestly Existence, 
III, (16) The Consecration of the Layman to the 
Care of Souls, III, (17) The Ignatian Mysticism 
of Joy in the World, III, (18) Priest and Poet, 
III, (19) Poetry and the Christian, IV, (20) 
Theological Remarks on the Problem of Leisure, 



* Unless indicated in parenthesis following the course number, each entry is a Full Course valued at 3 
or 4 quarter hours credit. 



38 



IV, (21) The Theology of Power, IV. The 

readings average about thirty pages a class. No 

paper is required. There will be a final oral 

examination of one half hour. Initial session at 

JSTC. 

Wulftange W 3:30-5:30 Fall 

SPRING 
CCTS B-401 
The Book of Psalms 

Select psalms will be studied from each literary 
or liturgical category with a view to their 
language and form, theology and devotion. 
Their lasting worth to Israel, to the New 
Testament church and to us will be explored. 
Initial session at NBTS. 
Bjornard/Stuhlmueller Th 2-4:30 Spring 

BTS T-459 

Theology and Literary Arts 

A study of various images of heroism in the 
American imagination through selected novels 
and plays. Particular attention will be given to 
the interplay between such themes as forest and 
settlement, individual and community, in- 
nocence and maturation, and the fate of the 
lonely "hero" in relation to the "alien tribe." 



Initial session at BTS. 

Groff/ Allen M 3:30-6 



Spring 



CCTS M-441 

Parish-Based Ministry with Public Community 

Colleges 

The course will examine the history, develop- 
ment, nature and uniqueness of public com- 
munity colleges in the context of American 
higher education. Arenas of potential contact 
and ministry in relation to the colleges will be 
explored. Resources at the colleges which are 
helpful to parishes will be considered. Models of 
ministries now being implemented across the 
country will be reviewed. Field trips will be con- 
ducted to the main campuses of several colleges, 
including an urban campus serving predominant- 
ly minority students and a suburban campus 
serving predominantly white students. Com- 
munity college personnel (such as students, 
faculty, and administrators) and parish pastors 
who have related to their local colleges in 
creative ways will also serve as resource per- 
sons. Common readings and individual or 
group research projects leading to final papers. 
Initial session at LSTC. 
McGown Th 7-10 pm Spring 



39 



CLUSTER BLACK STUDIES 



The Cluster endeavors to strengthen and to stimulate initiatives on the part of its 
member institutions to the issues posed for theological education and ministry by 
the experiences and perspectives of Blacks. An important structural expression of 
this endeavor is the Cluster Black Studies Committee. With staff support from the 
Cluster Black Studies Coordinator, the Committee exercises such leadership func- 
tions as the following: (1) to assist Blacks of the Cluster in articulating their con- 
cerns and to assist Cluster institutions in addressing such concerns; (2) to design 
strategies for incorporating issues raised by the experiences and perspectives of 
Blacks into the mainstream of the consciousness and curricula of the several in- 
stitutions; (3) to plan activities which educate members of the Cluster community 
regarding the nature and effects of racism and of ways in which it may be ef- 
fectively overcome; (4) and to facilitate the development of resources to fund and 
staff such enterprises as the foregoing. 

Approximately 53 Black students are pursuing studies in Cluster schools. 

The several Cluster institutions engage the following Black faculty, who 
represent the indicated areas of expertise : 



Robert M. Allen 
Homer U. Ashby, Jr. 
Colvin Blanford 
Alvin Bridges 
Earl L. Durham 
John O. Hodges 
Albert Pero, Jr. 
C. Shelby Rooks 
Charles S. Spivey 
Jeremiah A. Wright, Jr. 



FALL 



(BTS) 

(CCTS) 

(NBTS) 

(CCTS) 

(CCTS) 

(CCTS) 

(LSTC, CTU) 

(CTS) 

(CCTS) 

(CCTS) 

1977-78 Offerings' 



Humanities and Religion 

Pastoral Care 

Church and Community 

Church and Community 

Church and Community 

Religion and Literature 

Theology and Religious Education 

Ministry 

Preaching and Communication 

Liturgy and Worship 



CCTS E-401 

Theological Assessment of Contrasting Human 

Rights Traditions 

A critical assessment of the complementarity 
and contrast of American civil religion's focus 
on personal civil rights and of the focus of 
Marxist forms of liberation theologies on social 
and ecomonic rights, from biblical and 
theological perspectives. The course will be 
taught by an ecumenical faculty team related to 
the Faith and Order Commission of the 
National Council of Churches. Class sessions 
will be held at Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary, 2121 Sheridan Road, Evanston. 
Will/Cunningham/Miller Fall 

Pa wliko wski /Rigdon 

Intensive: Sept. 30-Oct. 1; 
Nov. 4-5; Dec. 2-3. 

F 2:30-5:30, S 9 am -4 pm 
* Unless indicated in parenthesis following the course 
or 4 quarter hours credit. 



CTU E-487 

The Ethical Dimensions of Marxist Humanism 

The course aims at introducing the student to 
the way in which the problem of man is set up 
and resolved in Marxist thought and praxis. It 
will study the way in which Marxism conceives, 
in theory and practice, a) the objective foun- 
dations of man's possibilities, b) the 
epistemological bases for the understanding of 
man and human praxis, and c) the main thought 
categories and socio-political structures through 
which a human and humanizing praxis can be 
realized. While based on the texts of the foun- 
ders of Marxism, the course will also trace the 
main variations which have developed in 
Marxism throughout its history and which are 
relevant in the present situation in Europe, Asia, 
Latin America and Africa. 
Fornasari MWF 11-11: 50 Fall 

number, each entry is a Full Course valued at 3 



40 



LSTC E-435 

Christianity and Capitalism 

This course will first trace the historical relation 
between the Christian faith and the develop- 
ment of capitalism. It will then move toward 
contemporary interpretations — both positive 
and negative — of modern capitalism, and con- 
clude with a critique dealing with this question: 
How compatible is the Christian ethic with the 
capitalist system? 
Benne MW 1:30-2: 45 Fall 

CCTS M-335 
Ministry Lab : The Sick 

These courses are basic ones in the ministry of 
caring, which includes "laboratory" experience 
with a particular population as well as a 
seminar for reflection and discussion. The course 
will be held off campus and may involve staff 
persons in the locale of the course. The purpose 
is to explore the meaning of pastoral care with a 
specific group of people, which involves 
deepening self-knowledge on the part of the 
"pastor" as well as learning more specifically the 
needs of the persons the pastor seeks to serve. 
Stettner/Ashby F 2 : 4 Fall 

DIT M-507 (2QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 

Supervised ministry to the imprisoned. Offered 

in response to student interest. 

Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-508, 509, 510 (2 OH each quarter) 
The Minister as Advocate for the Poor 

In this course the student-minister is placed as a 
paralegal aid at the Mid-South Law Office in 
south Chicago. After an initial period of 
training in welfare and tenant-landlord law 
procedures, he would begin interviewing and 
working with people eligible for government- 
entitled mandatory public assistance. Besides in- 
terviewing, the student would deal with the 
Department of Public Aid, and represent the 
poor at administrative hearings. On-the-job su- 
pervision is provided weekly by a supervising at- 
torney, and the student also participates in 
theological reflection sessions weekly. 
Placement in Latino communities is available. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter /Spring 

CCTS 1-520 (1 full course each quarter) 
Social Transformation: Intensive Unit I 

This course aims to assist students to develop an 
understanding of the interrelationships between 
Christian faith and the ministry of social trans- 
formation, between social scientific disciplines 



and the strategy and tactics of social action, and 
to become insightful and responsible par- 
ticipants in ministries of social change within 
church and community. For remainder of course 
description consult pp. 17 - 19. 
Dudley /Durham Fall/ Winter 

Pawlikowski/Tuite F 9-12 

plus Field Experiences 

WINTER 

CTSTEC^SSU^QH) 

Seminar in Contemporary Black Authors in 

Religion 

A critical reading of such authors as J. and C. 

Cone, Roberts, Wilmore, and Jones. 

Rooks M 7-8 :30 pm Winter 

CTU T-448 

Third World and Theology of Liberation 

After locating the theology of liberation within 
the broader framework of the task of theology, 
the course will explore in depth the various 
dimensions of liberation theology with par- 
ticular reference to the "Third World." 
Fuellenbach MW2-3:15 Winter 

LSTC T-456 
Liberation Theology 

This course aims to analyze the nature, func- 
tion, and method of liberation theology in order 
that the student may become aware of its poten- 
tial as serious theological discourse comparable 
to other classical theologies. Attention is given 
to some of the main theological issues and 
problems which can be anticipated in the study 
of liberation theology. 
Pero TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

CTU T-445 

Theology of the Church 

A study of the origins of the Church; the 
relation of the Kingdom to the Church; the 
basic images and themes in Scripture and 
tradition; the development of ecclesiastical of- 
fice; and the relation of the Church to the 
world, especially in relation to the socio- 
political situation of "Third World" countries. 
Fuellenbach MWF 12-12 : 50 Winter 

CCTS T-518 

Seminar on Black Worship and Liturgical 

Tradition 

An exploration of the potential for enrichment 
of the Western liturgical heritage by the Black ex- 
perience of worship. Special attention will be 
given to basic principles of liturgical prayer as 
they are operative in Black worship and to the 



41 



questions of liturgical "adaptation" called for in 
development of worship patterns truly Black 
and truly Catholic. 
Keifer /Wright Th2-4:30 Winter 

CTU T-505 

Constructing Local Theologies 

A seminar geared to investigating how Christian 
theological themes are developed in varying 
situations, particularly those not a part of main- 
stream Western culture. Students will be asked 
to choose a certain situation (e.g., Latino, 
Black, African, Japanese) and engage in recon- 
structing some theological themes based upon 
their own background in the Western Christian 
tradition and on experience or guided reading in 
the particular cultural situation. Prior consent 
of the instructor is required for admission. 
Schreiter Tu 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

CCTS E-451 
Christian Ethics 

The aim of this course is to investigate the 
Christian approach to the main social issues of 
today. Consideration will be given to the 
biblical and theological basis for social action. 
Central social issues, including the socio- 
economic and political structure, personal and 
civil rights, war and peace, labor and 
management, and interpersonal relations, will 
be studied. Special attention will be given to 
minority rights and social justice. Field trips to 
social institutions will be included. 
Young/Hodges MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Winter 

CTU W-563 

Religious Education in Cross-Cultural 

Perspective 

Research seminar in religious educational 
systems among Black, Latino, and Native 
American children with 1) inquiry into the 
traditional religious educational systems offered 
to white children and its impact on minority 
children; 2) focus on a minority church which 
has developed or is in the process of developing 
a minority educational system, and study of the 
uniqueness of this process; 3) identification and 
assessment of minority religious educational 
model(s) which can be instrumental in guiding 
further research in this area. Limited to students 
with previous experience in religious education 
and in cross-cultural ministry, or with consent 
of instructor. 
Barbour W 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

LSTC M-467 

Global Consciousness and Religious Education 



A careful study and evaluation of a pedagogical 
process by which a person or a people gain a 
new awareness of their own reality, the forces 
which objectify and oppress them within that 
reality, and the potentiality for becoming the 
subjects of their own liberation (redemption) as 
well as becoming the agents of change for 
religious education. 
Per o M W 1 : 30-2 : 45 Win ter 

CCTS M-473 

Mass Media and the Liberation Message 

An analysis of contemporary media's power to 
transmit and inform, to influence and motivate 
values. The church's theology of human 
liberation will be employed to evaluate such 
media as film, television, radio, print and ad- 
vertising and their impact upon the church's 
theology of human liberation, including such 
areas as racial and women's issues and 
stereotypes. Course approaches include 
seminars, film screenings (such as Bunuel's "Vir- 
diana"), attendance at Chicago's Midwest Film 
Conference and selected projects and produc- 
tions. 
Kennel/Spivey Th3:30-6 Winter 

DIT M-311, 312 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care of the Disadvantaged 

Varied experience in helping activities as spon- 
sored by social and community organizations in 
the Chicago area. Full working day, once each 
week, in centers participating in care offered 
varied ethnic groups living in disadvantaged cir- 
cumstances. Guidance in work with youth, 
adults, aged, given by agencies' staff personnel. 
Reports and supervisory seminar at De Andreis 
once each week. 
Kennedy Th 9 : 10-10 : 10 Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-507 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 

For course description consult Fall Quarter of- 
ferings. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter /Spring 

DIT M-509 (2 QH each quarter) 

The Minister as Advocate for the Poor 

For course description consult Fall Quarter of- 
ferings. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

SPRING 

BTS T-459 

Theology and Literary Arts 

A study of various images of heroism in the 



42 



American imagination through selected novels 
and plays. Particular attention will be given to 
the interplay between such themes as forest and 
settlement, individual and community, in- 
nocence and maturation, and the fate of the 
lonely "hero" in relation to the "alien tribe." 
Initial session at BTS. 
Groff/ Allen M 3: 30-6 Spring 

DIT E-443 
Social Justice 

The course will consider the social mission of 
the Church in the world. It will set the modern 
horizon via an analysis of the Enlightenment, 
Marxism, capitalism, and secularism. Develop- 
ment of papal social teaching will be examined. 
Political theology, Liberation theology, and 
Theology of the Cross will be used to focus the 
question of the Church's social mission. 
Minogue MWF 10:10-11 Spring 

NBTS E-452 

The Church and Social Change 

A study of the role of the Christian Church in 
affecting social change, both in the past and the 
present. A significant part of this study will 
focus on the roles of Black churchmen and Black 
congregations as change agents. 
Blanford Th 7-9:30 pm Spring 

LSTC W-417 

America in Third World Perspective 

Frustrations with health care, a crisis in 
educational systems, the slow pace of women's 
liberation, questions about the meaning of 
work, and the role of religion in society and 
culture: these are vital areas of concern in 
America and throughout the world. Using a 
comparative method, the course will examine 
approaches to these five problems in Third 
World countries with different social systems — 
People's Republic of China, Tanzania, and 
Cuba — in order to gain perspective for dealing 
with the same problems in America. 
Scherer MW 1 : 30-2 : 45 Spring 

CCTS M-409 (2 QH) 

Church Strategies for Changing Communities 

In metropolitan America, almost every com- 
munity is in transition, from the racial changes 
in the center of the cities to the rural-suburban 



transition on the growing edge, including all the 
aging of communities in between. The course 
will study cases and visit places of transition to 
determine the causes and patterns of changing 
communities. Special attention will be given to 
the positive role of the church in community 
change, and to the negative consequences of in- 
decision in the midst of change. Open to pastors 
and laypersons as well as students. 
Dudley/Bridges Tu 4-6 Spring 

DIT M-312 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care of the Disadvantaged 

For course description consult Winter Quarter 

offerings. 

Kennedy TBAr Winter/Spring 

DIT M-507 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 

For course description consult Fall Quarter of- 
ferings. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-510 (2 QH each quarter) 

The Minister as Advocate for the Poor 

For course description consult Fall Quarter of- 
ferings. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

CCTS 1-560 (2 or 3 full courses) 

Cross Cultural Communication: Intensive 

Unit I 

The Intensive Unit has a double major thrust 
which will serve the needs and goals of a wide 
variety of students. On the one hand, it will 
give high priority to those students who desire 
to work or study in another cultural en- 
vironment and will help them acquire beginning 
levels of competence for effective com- 
munication in cultures and subcultures other 
than their own. At the same time, the con- 
centration will provide a wider range of students 
the opportunity to experience in a unique way 
the cultural assumptions and limits of their 
theological thinking, and to lay the foundation 
for a broader international, interracial and 
ecumenical understanding, concern and com- 
mitment both in their theological education as 
well as in their further ministry. For remainder 
of course description consult pp. 21-24. 
Armendariz /Barbour /Boberg/Pero Spring 

M9-3, W 3:30-9:30 pm 



43 



CLUSTER WOMEN'S ISSUES 



The Cluster undertakes to support and to advocate commitments by its member 
institutions to the issues raised for theological education and ministry by the ex- 
periences and perspectives of women. A significant organizational manifestation of 
this undertaking is the Cluster Women's Issues Committee. With staff support 
from the Cluster Women's Issues Coordinator, the Committee provides such 
leadership functions as the following: (1) to assist women of the Cluster, including 
spouses, in expressing their concerns and to assist Cluster institutions in respon- 
ding to such concerns; (2) to design strategies for incorporating the issues posed by 
the experiences and perspectives of women into the focal awareness and program- 
ming of the various institutions, (3) to plan activities which educate members of 
the Cluster community regarding the nature and effects of sexism and of means by 
which it may be effectively overcome; and (4) to facilitate the development of 
resources to fund and staff such enterprises as the above. Activities through which 
the Committee seeks to serve women and the larger Cluster constituency include 
publication of a periodical, PersonAge; formulation and presentation of specific 
curricular and personnel recommendations related to women's concerns; con- 
sultation and cooperation with women's caucuses and wives' groups in the respec- 
tive Cluster schools; and sponsorship and leadership of such programs and projects 
as conferences, workshops, retreats, orientations, survey research, film and dia- 
logue groups, socials, and student-faculty rap sessions. 

Approximately 232 women students are pursuing studies in Cluster schools. 

The several Cluster institutions engage the following women faculty, who 
represent the indicated areas of expertise: 



Elizabeth E. Adams 

Claude Marie Barbour 

Doris Ann Borchert 

Jean Bozeman 

Adela Yarbro Collins 

Agnes Cunningham, S.S.C.M. 

Nancy R. Fa us 

Ardith Hayes 

Shirley J. Heckman 

Elvire Hilgert 

Estella Boggs Horning 

Helen A. Kenik, O.P. 

Lauree Hersch Meyer 

Carolyn A. Osiek R. S.C.J. 

Rosemary Radford Ruether 

Marjorie Tuite, O.P. 

Barbara Brown Zikmund 



(M/L) Religious Education 

(CTU) World Mission 

(NBTS) Religious Education 

(LSTC) Religious Education 

(MTS) New Testament 

(SML) Church History 

(BTS) Ministry 

(MTS) Ministry, Field Education 

(BTS) Religious Education 

(MTS) Theological Librarianship 

(BTS) Old Testament 

(JSTC) Old Testament 

(BTS) Historical Theology 

(CTU) New Testament 

(MTS) Ethics 

(JSTC) Church and Community 

(CTS) Church History 



FALL 



1977-78 Offerings' 



CTU B-576 

The Ministry of Women in the Early Church 

For a fuller understanding of the Church and its 
total ministry, this course will explore the 



variety of roles exercised by women in the early 
Church from the Apostolic to the Constantinian 
Age, with special focus on the interpretation of 
Pauline passages about women and the impact 



* Unless indicated in parenthesis following the course number, each entry is a Full Course valued at 3 
or 4 quarter hours credit. 



44 



of the texts of contemporary thinking regarding 
women in ministry. Critical analysis of texts by 
students will be stressed. 
Osiek Th 2-4:30 Fall 

MTS T-432 

Feminist Perspectives in Theology 

The course will deal with theological develop- 
ments given impetus by the women's 
movement, including the work of women 
theologians (e.g., Letty Russell, Mary Daly). 
These theologians will be examined in relation 
to systematic theology and to social theory 
(e.g., Peter Berger). 
Adjunct Tu 7-10 pm Fall 

CCTS E-401 

Theological Assessment of Contrasting Human 

Rights Traditions 

A critical assessment of the complementarity 
and contrast of American civil religion's focus 
on personal civil rights and of the focus of 
Marxist forms of liberation theologies on social 
and economic rights, from biblical and 
theological perspectives. The course will be 
taught by an ecumenical faculty team related to 
the Faith and Order Commission of the 
National Council of Churches. Class sessions 
will be held at Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary, 2121 Sheridan Road, Evanston. 
Will/Cunningham/Miller Fall 

Pawlikowski/Rigdon 

Intensive: Sept. 30-Oct. 1; 

Nov. 4-5; Dec. 2-3. 
F 2:30-5:30, S 9 am - 4 pm 

CTU E-580 

The Theology and Ethics of Christian Marriage 

This is an interdisciplinary study offering an 
overview of marriage in terms of its rich 
Christian tradition (Scripture, the Fathers and 
liturgical rites) and also attempting to 
systematize this material in view of reaching 
ethical decisions that are sensitive to such 
modern problems as divorce, contraception and 
new styles of marital relationship. 
MacDonald TTh9-10:15 Fall 

MTS M-310 
Women in Ministry 

An introductory course designed for women 
who want to explore the opportunities, 
problems and concerns encountered by women 
in ministry. Students will be introduced, 
through dialogue and interviews, to the varieties 
of ministries in which women are engaged (e.g., 



chaplaincy, staff and administrative positions, 
pastor, campus ministry). The meaning of or- 
dination, role expectations and the dynamics of 
sexism will be discussed. Special attention will 
be given to preaching, liturgy, theology and 
counseling from the woman's perspective. 
A. Hayes/Prasse MW 2-4 Fall 

WINTER 

JSTC T-551 

Theology of Priestly Ministry 

The nature of ordained ministry in the Church 
has become a "disputed question" in Roman 
Catholic theology. The purpose of this course is 
to seek some guidelines and principles for 
fashioning a new theological interpretation of 
"priestly" ministry in a Roman Catholic context. 
Some attention will be given to the historical 
origins and development of this ministry, but 
the bulk of the time will be devoted to a variety 
of contemporary theologies of priestly ministry. 
By relating the central question to Christology 
and Ecclesiology, some basis will be sought for 
judging responsibly such contemporary issues 
as the "permanance" of priestly office, the ap- 
propriateness of celibacy, and the ordination of 
women. The format will be that of a seminar, 
with substantial weekly reading assignments as 
the basis for informed, critical discussion of the 
issues. Participants will be asked to write a brief 
paper (1-2 pages) each week, in reaction to the 
readings. The grade will be determined by the 
quality of these papers and by participation in 
the discussions. No term paper. 
Fehr TTh 9-10:15 Winter 

LSTC E-430 
Ethics of Sex 

A course aimed at examining, from a Christian 
point of view, issues dealing with the realm of 
the sexual — premarital sex, marital fidelity, 
homosexuality, gender, sexism, etc. 
Benne TTh 12:30-1:45 Winter 

CCTS M-473 

Mass Media and the Liberation Message 

An analysis of contemporary media's power to 
transmit and inform, to influence and motivate 
values. The church's theology of human 
liberation will be employed to evaluate such 
media as film, television, radio, print and ad- 
vertising and their impact upon the church's 
theology of human liberation, including such 
areas as racial and women's issues and 
stereotypes. Course approaches include 



45 



seminars, film screenings (such as Bunuel's "Vir- 
diana"), attendance at Chicago's Midwest Film 
Conference and selected projects and produc- 
tions. 
Kennel/Spivey Th 3:30-6 



Winter 



SPRING 



CTS CH-393 

Women in the American Protestant Tradition 

A look at the role of women in the history of 
American Protestantism through autobiography 
and biography. All students will read six 
autobiographies or biographies in common and 
make a class presentation on one woman. 
Zikmund W 3-6 Spring 

JSTC T-584 

C.G. Jung and Theology 

A study of the theological implications of 
Jungian therapy and thought focused toward in- 
terrelating psychotherapy and theology. Basic 
readings in Jung (more advanced for those 
acquainted with him), lecture and discussion on 
theological evaluation of him: myth and sym- 
bol, individuation process, trinity and femininity 
within. Accountability will be an oral exam on 
Jung and a paper evaluating theologically some 
aspect of his thought. 
Sears TTh 9-10:15 Spring 

MTS E-435 

Women, Social Issues and Ethical Decision- 
Making 

The course will combine historical, cultural 
background, socio-economic analysis and 
practical discussion and models of decision 
making. For each problem studied there will be 
background lectures on the cultural ideologies 
which have influenced our thinking on the sub- 
ject, including biblical, theological and general 
cultural materials. All of this received material 
will be critiqued. The socio-economic context of 
each problem will also be studied. Each student 
will work on a concrete case study in a specific 
area and present it to the class as an example of 
ethical decision making under particular cir- 
cumstances. Much of the work of the class will 
come to a focus in the discussion of these case 
studies. Each student will also be expected to in- 
vestigate one community agency that is dealing 
with a particular issue. These investigations will 
be reported to class. There will be an effort to 
draw up a profile of such groups working in the 
Chicago area and the strengths and deficiencies 
of such available groups for women's needs. 



Issues treated in the course will be drawn from 
the following areas: control of one's own body, 
violence, the individual and the couple, 
the domestic role of women, the home-work 
dichotomy and women at work. Prerequisite: 
one course in women's studies or background 
reading to be specified by the instructor. 
Ruether M 7-10 pm Spring 

LSTC W-417 

America in Third World Perspective 

Frustrations with health care, a crisis in 
educational systems, the slow pace of women's 
liberation, questions about the meaning of 
work, and the role of religion in society and 
culture: these are vital areas of concern in 
America and throughout the world. Using a 
comparative method, the course will examine 
approaches to these five problems in Third 
World countries with different social 
systems — People's Republic of China, Tanzania, 
and Cuba — in order to gain perspective for 
dealing with the same problems in America. 
Scherer M W 1 : 30-2 : 45 Sp ring 

MTS M-416 

Sexual Dynamics in Relation to Pastoral Care 

and Counseling 

For men and women who will be giving and 
receiving pastoral care and counseling . The 
practice of pastoral care and counseling requires 
awareness of and skill in handling the dynamics 
arising from sexuality, sexual identity and 
sexual roles. The course will include, but not be 
limited to, consideration of the effect of the 
social and cultural context on mental health; 
the 'double standard" in mental health for 
women and men; dynamics of interaction be- 
tween men and women in the pastoral care set- 
ting; and pressures for change in the practice of 
pastoral counseling arising from the changing 
role perceptions and expectations for women 
and men in church and society. 
A. Hayes MW 11-1 Spring 

CTS CM-438 

The Middle Age Crisis 

An examination of the developmental tasks and 
crises of the middle years of life. Female and 
Male experiences with marriage, vocation, 
family, and life's meaning will be explored. The 
response of the church and ministry to these 
persons will be studied. 
Anderson TBAr Spring 



46 



CCTS 1-560 (2 or 3 full courses) 

Cr oss-Cultural Communication : Intensive 

Unit I 

The Intensive Unit has a double major thrust 
which will serve the needs and goals of a wide 
variety of students. On the one hand, it will 
give high priority to those students who desire 
to work or study in another cultural en- 
vironment and will help them acquire beginning 
levels of competence for effective com- 
munication in cultures and subcultures other 



than their own. At the same time, the con- 
centration will provide a wider range of students 
the opportunity to experience in a unique way 
the cultural assumptions and limits of their 
theological thinking, and to lay the foundation 
for a broader, international, interracial and 
ecumenical understanding, concern and com- 
mitment both in their theological as well as in 
their further ministry. For remainder of course 
description consult pp. 21-24. 
Armendariz/Barbour/Boberg/Pero Spring 

M9-3, W 3:30-9:30 pm 



47 



CLUSTER LATINO STUDIES 



The Cluster seeks to foster and enhance the concern of its member institutions 
for issues generated in theological education and ministry by the experiences and 
perspectives of Latinos. The Cluster's efforts are guided through its Latino Studies 
Committee, which is comprised of representatives from the several schools. 

The Committee provides leadership in addressing such functions as the 
following: (1) to assist Latinos of the Cluster in voicing their concerns and to assist 
Cluster institutions in responding to such concerns; (2) to frame proposals for in- 
corporating issues represented by the experiences and perspectives of Latinos into 
the understandings and program offerings of the several institutions; (3) to plan 
activities which educate members of the Cluster community regarding the nature 
and effects of ethnic discrimination and of means by which it can be effectively 
overcome; and (4) to facilitate the development of resources to fund and staff such 
enterprises as the above. 

Approximately 31 Latino students are pursuing studies in Cluster schools. 



Ruben P. Armendariz 
Ismael Garcfa 
Jorge Gonzalez 
Justo Gonzalez 
Rafael Sanchez 



(MTS) Ministry 

(MTS) Biblical Studies 

(MTS) Biblical Studies 

(MTS) Church History 

(MTS) Pastoral Care and Counseling 



1977-78 Offerings' 




FALL 
CCTS E-401 

Theological Assessment of Contra 
Rights Traditions 

A critical assessment of the complementarity and 
contrast of American civil religion's focus on 
personal civil rights and of the focus of Marxist 
forms of liberation theologies on social and 
economic rights, from biblical and theological 
perspectives. The course will be taught by an 
ecumenical faculty team related to the Faith and 
Order Commission of the National Council of 
Churches. Class sessions will be held at Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary, 2121 
Sheridan Road, Evanston. 

Will/Cunningham/Miller Fall 

Pawlikowski/Rigdon 

Intensive: Sept. 30-Oct. 1; 
Nov. 4-5; Dec. 2-3. 

F 2:30-5:30, S 9 am - 4 pm 

MTS B-410 

New Testament Interpretation in the Hispanic 

Context 

The themes and content of the New Testament 
as understood by Hispanic interpreters past and 
present. An approach with the needs of the 



Hispanic in mind. 
Weiss 



M 7-10 pm 



Fall 



MTS H-310 

Hispanic Church Reformers 

This course will study the contribution to the 

Reformation by Spanish Reformers from the 

16th Century to present including the Spanish 

mystics. 

Justo Gonzalez TBAr Fall 

CTU E-487 

The Ethical Dimensions of Marxist Humanism 

The course aims at introducing the student to 
the way in which the problem of man is set up 
and resolved in Marxist thought and praxis. It 
will study the way in which Marxism conceives, 
in theory and practice, a) the objective foun- 
dations of man's possibilities, b) the 
epistemological bases for the understanding of 
man and of human praxis, and c) the main 
thought categories and socio-political structures 
through which a human and humanizing praxis 
can be realized. While based on the texts of the 
founders of Marxism, the course will also trace 
the main variations which have developed in 
Marxism throughout its history and which are 



* Unless indicated in parenthesis following the course number, each entry is a Full Course valued at 3 
or 4 quarter hours credit. 



48 



relevant in the present situation in Europe, Asia, 

Latin America and Africa. 

Fornasari MWF 11-11: 50 Fall 

LSTC E-435 

Christianity and Capitalism 

This course will first trace the historical 
relation between the Christian faith and the 
development of capitalism. It will then move 
toward contemporary interpretations — both 
positive and negative — of modern capitalism, 
and conclude with a critique dealing with this 
question: How compatible is the Christian ethic 
with the capitalist system? 
Benne MW 1:30-2: 45 Fall 

DIT M-507 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 

Supervised ministry to the imprisoned. Offered 

in response to student interest. 

Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-508 (2 QH each quarter) 

The Minister as Advocate for the Poor 

In this course the student-minister is placed as a 
paralegal aid at the Mid-South Office in south 
Chicago. After an initial period of training in 
welfare and tenant-landlord law procedures, he 
would begin interviewing and working with peo- 
ple eligible for government-entitled mandatory 
public assistance. Besides interviewing, the 
student would deal with the Department of 
Public Aid, and represent the poor at ad- 
ministrative hearings. On-the-job supervision is 
provided weekly by a supervising attorney, and 
the student also participates in theological 
reflection sessions weekly. Placement in Latino 
communities is available. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter /Spring 

CCTS 1-520 (1 full course each quarter) 
Social Transformation: Intensive Unit I 

This course aims to assist students to develop an 
understanding of the interrelationships between 
Christian faith and the ministry of social trans- 
formation, between social scientific disciplines 
and the strategy and tactics of social action, and 
to become insightful and responsible par- 
ticipants in ministries of social change within 
church and community. For remainder of course 
description consult pp. 17-19. 
Dudley /Durham Fall/ Winter 

Pawlikowski/Tuite F 9-12 

plus Field Experiences 



WINTER 

MTS H-312 

Critical History of the Spanish Bible 

This course will examine the historical develop- 
ment as well as critical studies in the translation 
of the Spanish Bible from the original 
languages. 
Jorge Gonzalez March 13-17, TBAn Winter 

CTU T-448 

Third World and Theology of Liberation 

After locating the theology of liberation within 
the broader framework of the task of theology, 
the course will explore in depth the various 
dimensions of liberation theology with par- 
ticular reference to the "Third World." 
Fuellenbach MW2-3:15 Winter 

LSTC T-456 
Liberation Theology 

This course aims to analyze the nature, func- 
tion, and method of liberation theology in order 
that the student may become aware of its poten- 
tial as serious theological discourse comparable 
to other classical theologies. Attention is given 
to some of the main theological issues and 
problems which can be anticipated in the study 
of liberation theology. 
Pero TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

CTU T-445 

Theology of the Church 

A study of the origins of the Church; the 
relation of the Kingdom to the Church; the 
basic images and themes in Scripture and 
tradition; the development of ecclesiastical of- 
fice; and the relation of the Church to the world, 
especially in relation to the socio-political 
situation of "Third World" countries. 
Fuellenbach MWF 12-12: 50 Winter 

CTU T-505 

Constructing Local Theologies 

A seminar geared to investigating how Christian 
theological themes are developed in varying 
situations, particularly those not part of main- 
stream Western culture. Students will be asked 
to choose a certain situation (e.g., Latino, Black, 
African, Japanese) and engage in reconstructing 
some theological themes based upon their own 
background in the Western Christian tradition 
and on experience or guided reading in the par- 
ticular cultural situation. Prior consent of in- 
structor required for admission. 
Schreiter Tu 7-9 :30 pm Winter 



49 



NBTS M-462 
Hispanic Ministry 

The course will focus on the special concerns 
and issues of Hispanic ministry, particularly in 
an urban setting. 
TB An M 7-9 : 30 pm Win ter 

MTS M-419 

From Text to Sermon 

An exegesis course with emphasis on preaching. 
Review of the text will help the student in 
preparation and preaching in the context of an 
Hispanic congregation. Text for 1977-78 to be 
selected. The course will be offered in Spanish 
and English. If all students are Spanish- 
speaking, the course will be taught in Spanish. 
Armendariz. F 2-5 Winter 

LSTC M-467 

Global Consciousness and Religious Education 

A careful study and evaluation of a pedagogical 
process by which a person or a people gain a 
new awareness of their own reality, the forces 
which objectify and oppress them within that 
reality, and the potentiality for becoming the 
subjects of their own liberation (redemption) as 
well as becoming the agents of change for 
religious education. 
Pero MW 1 : 30-2 : 45 Winter 

DIT M-311 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care of the Disadvantaged 

Varied experience in helping activities as spon- 
sored by social and community organizations in 
the Chicago area. Full working day, once each 
week, in centers participating in care offered 
varied ethnic groups living in disadvantaged cir- 
cumstances. Guidance in work with youth, 
adults, aged, given by agencies' staff personnel. 
Reports and supervisory seminar at De Andreis 
once each week. 
Kennedy Th 9:10-10:10 Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-507 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 

For course description consult Fall Quarter of- 
ferings. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-509 (2 QH each quarter) 

The Minister as Advocate for the Poor 

For course description consult Fall Quarter of- 
ferings. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 



JSTC H-418 

History of Christian Spirituality : 16th Century 

Spanish Mystics 

A study of the spiritual theologies of Teresa of 
Avila and John of the Cross, through lectures, 
readings, and discussions of selected writings, 
e.g., the Autobiography, Way of Perfection, 
and Interior Castle of Teresa of Avila; selections 
from The Ascent of Mount Carmel and The 
Dark Night of John of the Cross. Final paper 
and written or oral examination. 
Montague Th 3:30-5:30 Spring 

MTS T-315 

Hispanic- American Cultural Resources for 

Theological Reflection 

Recent writings by Hispanic authors offer 
cultural resources for theological reflection. 
Selected sources will be examined for the pur- 
pose of gleaning those contributions which lend 
themselves to such reflections. 
Armendariz F 9-12 Spring 

MTS T-436 

Karl Marx and Christian Theology 

This course is designed to familiarize the student 
with the basic work and concept of Karl Marx. 
Particular attention will be given to his concepts 
on alienation, social change, historical 
materialism, ideology, and his understanding of 
the nature and meaning of religion as well as the 
influence of Marx in Latin American Theology 
of Liberation. 
Garcia M 2-5 Spring 

DIT E-443 
Social Justice 

The course will consider the social mission of 
the Church in the world. It will set the modern 
horizon via an analysis of the Enlightenment, 
Marxism, capitalism, and secularism. Develop- 
ment of papal social teaching will be examined. 
Political theology, Liberation theology, and 
Theology of the Cross will be used to focus the 
question of the Church's social mission. 
Minogue MWF 10:10-11 Spring 

LSTC W-417 

America in Third World Perspective 

Frustrations with health care, a crisis in 
educational systems, the slow pace of women's 
liberation, questions about the meaning of 
work, and the role of religion in society and 
culture: these are vital areas of concern in 
America and throughout the world. Using a 
comparative method, the course will examine 
approaches to these five problems in Third 



50 



World countries with different social systems — 
People's Republic of China, Tanzania, and 
Cuba — in order to gain perspective for dealing 
with the same problems in America. 
Scherer MW 1 : 30-2 : 45 Spring 

CCTS M-409 (2 QH) 

Church Strategies for Changing Communities 

In metropolitan America, almost every com- 
munity is in transition, from the racial changes 
in the center of the cities to the rural-suburban 
transition on the growing edge, including all the 
aging of communities in between. The course 
will study cases and visit places of transition to 
determine the causes and patterns of changing 
communities. Special attention will be given to 
the positive role of the church in community 
change and to the negative consequences of in- 
decision in the midst of change. Open to pastors 
and laypersons as well as students. 
Dudley/Bridges Tu 4-6 Spring 

DIT M-312 (2 QH each quarter) 

Pastoral Care of the Disadvantged 

For course description consult Winter Quarter 

offerings. 

Kennedy TBAr Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-507 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 

For course description consult Fall Quarter of- 
ferings. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter/Spring 



DIT M-510 (2 QH each quarter) 
Minister as Advocate for the Poor 

For course description consult Fall Quarter of- 
ferings. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 



CCTS 1-560 (2 or 3 full courses) 

Cross Cultural Communication: Intensive 

Unit I 

The Intensive Unit has a double major thrust 
which will serve the needs and goals of a wide 
variety of students. On the one hand, it will 
give high priority to those students who desire 
to work or study in another cultural en- 
vironment and will help them acquire beginning 
levels of competence for effective com- 
munication in cultures and subcultures other 
than their own. At the same time, the con- 
centration will provide a wider range of students 
the opportunity to experience in a unique way 
the cultural assumptions and limits of their 
theological thinking, and to lay the foundation 
for a broader international, interracial and 
ecumenical understanding, concern and com- 
mitment both in their theological education as 
well as in their further ministry. For remainder 
of course description consult pp. 21-24. 
Armendariz /Barbour /Boberg /Per o Spring 

M9-3, W 3:30-9:30 pm 



51 



COURSES OF STUDY 

I. BIBLICAL STUDIES 

A. OLD TESTAMENT 



BTS/NBTS B-323 

Old Testament Introduction I : History 

and Archaeology 

A study of the history of Israel from 2000-65 BC 
with special emphasis on major events. The im- 
portance of archaeological discoveries is in- 
vestigated. Students will be required to read 
from a good translation, Genesis — II Kings. 
Bjornard/Roop MWF 10: 30-11: 20 Fall 

BTS/NBTS B-324 

Old Testament Introduction II : Literature 

A study to recognize and understand the basic 
disciplines of Old Testament interpretation, and 
to exegete selected Old Testament passages ac- 
cording to a recognized methodology. Students 
will be requested to read all poetic and prophetic 
books of the Old Testament. 
Bj ornard/Roop MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Winter 

BTS/NBTS B-325 

Old Testament Theology 

A study of the origin and development of prin- 
cipal teachings of the Old Testament, as it is in- 
spired by Divine revelation in the context of 
surrounding cultures and religions. 
Bjornard/Roop MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Spring 

CTS CH-301 

The People and Faith of Israel I 

An introduction for beginning students to the 
problems of the historical and theological in- 
terpretation of the Old Testament against the 
background of the development of historical 
critical methods of biblical study. 
Lacocque I 4 WF 9-9 : 50 Win ter 

CTU B-300 

Old Testament Introduction 

The books and religious traditions of the Old 
Testament are studied against their historical 
and cultural background, primarily for their 
own sake but also for their religious and 
pastoral implications. Students will demonstrate 
an ability to interpret and explain major 
traditions and literary types. The course is 
designed not only to prepare for further in- 
depth study of the Bible but also to enrich high 
school teachers and adult discussion leaders. 
Spilly MWF 10-10:50 Fall 

Spilly M 7-9:30 pm Fall 



DIT B-341 

General Introduction to Scripture 

This course explains the theological un- 
derstanding of inspiration, canonicity, and 
magisterium in regard to the Bible as they 
emerge from the Scriptures themselves. It 
studies also the history of the text, translations, 
archaeology, biblical geography and the history 
of exegesis. This course also explains some 
preliminary notions about methodologies. Book 
reports and an examination are required. 
Fischer /Walsh MWF 8: 10-9 Fall 

JSTC B-300 

Old Testament Theology I : Study in the 
Tetrateuch, the Deuteronomistic History and 
the Work of the Chronicler 

A survey of the biblical literature focusing upon 
the message of the texts in term6 of faith respon- 
ses to specific religious and cultural crises. At- 
tention will be given to the development of a 
responsible exegetical methodology and to the 
relevance of the material for ministry. 
Kenik TTh 9-10:15 Fall 

JSTC B-302 

Old Testament Theology II: Study in 

Prophets, Psalms, and Wisdom 

A survey of the poetic literature, focusing upon 
the prophetic tradition in Israel's faith and upon 
Israel's faith response in liturgy and in life. At- 
tention will be given to questions of 
methodology in dealing with various literary 
forms, to theological content, and to the 
significance of these biblical models for 
ministry. 
Kenik TTh 9-10:15 Winter 

LSTC B-310 

Old Testament Studies I 

Introduction to the Pentateuch and survey of 
Israel's history through the United Monarchy, 
with particular attention given to the problems 
of Exodus and Conquest. 

Fuerst Fall 

MWF 9-9:50 (plus 1 of 4 sections) 

LSTC B-311 

Old Testament Studies II 

A study of the prophetic movement from Elijah 
to the post-exilic prophets and the beginning of 



52 



Biblical Studies: Old Testament 



eschatology and apocalypticism in the Old 
Testament. 

Michel Winter 

TTh 8:30-9:45 (plus 1 of 4 sections) 

LSTC B-312 

Old Testament Studies III 

A survey course covering the biblical books 
other than the Pentateuch and the Prophets; the 
Intertestamental literature; Old Testament Her- 
meneutics; and a brief introduction to the 
Talmud. 

Michel Spring 

TTh 8:30-9:45 (plus 1 of 4 sections) 

MTS B-301 

The Yahwist Revolution: Introduction to the 

Old Testament 

Introduction to Israel's antecedents, birth as a 
people, and early life as a nation, focusing on 
Genesis - I Samuel. Attention is given to ap- 
propriate critical methods for general Old 
Testament study, and to the content and 
theology of Israel's early epic-traditions and 
law. 
Campbell TTh 11-1 Fall 

MTS B-312 

From David to Daniel: History, Literature, 

Theological Ferment 

A study of the Israelite and Jewish literature 
from II Samuel to I Maccabees, giving in-depth 
attention to representatives of each canonical 
division and literary category. Prerequisite: The 
course presupposes familiarity with critical 
method as acquired in Yahwist Revolution or its 
equivalent. 
Campbell TTh 11-1 Winter 

MTS H-312 

Critical History of the Spanish Bible 

For course description consult Historical 

Studies: Modern offerings. 

Jorge Gonzalez Mar. 13-17, TBAn Winter 

CTU 1-315 

Interpretation and Ministry 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 
Integrative Studies offerings. 
Osiek/Schreiter MW 12-1: 15 Spring 

Osiek/Schreiter MW2-3:15 Spring 

DIT B-442 

Old Testament Survey I 

This course (the first of a two quarter sequence) 
begins the survey of the history and theology of 
the books of the Old Testament. An historical 
framework is offered within which the books of 
the Old Testament are considered within their 



literary categories. A synthesis of the theology 
of the Old Testament is attempted. Emphasis is 
placed on methodologies of interpreting the 
literary genres. Book reports and a scholarly 
paper are required. Opportunity will be 
provided for some students to translate their 
academic work into popular communication by 
participation in lay discussion groups as an 
alternative to the scholarly paper. Prerequisite: 
DIT B-341 or equivalent. 
Fischer MWF 9 : 10-10 Win ter 

DIT B-443 

Old Testament Survey II 

This course continues the work of DIT B-442. 

Prerequisites: DIT B-341 and B-442 or 

equivalent. 

Fischer MWF 8: 10-9 Spring 

CTU B-400 
Pentateuch 

Pentateuchal traditions, including the primeval 
history, patriarchs , Exodus, Sinai and wilder- 
ness wanderings, are studied in the context of 
their literary origins and development and in the 
light of their importance for Old Testament 
religion and theology. Emphasis will be on the 
analysis of select passages and their applicability 
to contemporary doctrinal, ethical or pastoral 
questions. 

Spilly M 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

Spilly TTh 12-1: 15 Winter 

MTS B-441 
Exodus 

A study of the Book of Exodus, with special at- 
tention to (1) the relation between narrative and 
legal forms in the book, and (2) the relations 
between archaeology, history, and biblical 
theology for understanding the book and its im- 
pact. Hebrew is not required, but opportunity 
will be provided for its use. 
Boling MW 11-1 Spring 

CCTS B-401 

The Book of Psalms 

Select psalms will be studied from each literary 

or liturgical category with a view to their 

language and form, theology and devotion. 

Their lasting worth to Israel, the New 

Testament church and to us will be explored. 

Initial session at NBTS. 

Bjornard/Stuhlmueller Th 2-4:30 Spring 

CTU B-420 
Psalms 

Select psalms will be studied from each literary 
or liturgical category for an analysis of their 
language, form and theology. Their lasting worth 




53 



Biblical Studies: Old Testament 



to Israel, to the New Testament church and 
to us will be explored. Helpful for students of 
liturgy and spirituality or for a review of Old 
Testament religion. 
Stuhlmueller MW2-3:15 Spring 

MTS B-444 
Psalms 

A study of the songs of the Psalter, with special 
attention to their formal characteristics, their 
societal origins, and their significance for the 
development of biblical theological perspectives. 
Knowledge of Hebrew will be useful but is not 
required. May be augmented for Th.M. pur- 
poses. 
Boling W 7-10 pm Fall 

CTU B-425 
Wisdom Literature 

Primary focus will be on such perennial themes 
as creation, suffering, birth and death, 
retribution and immortality in Job, Proverbs, 
Ecclesiastes, Sirach, and the Wisdom of 
Solomon. Wisdom theology with its emphasis 
on human behavior will be compared with other 
theologies found in the Old Testament. At- 
tention will be given to the applicability of this 
theology to contemporary human development 
and pastoral ministry. 
Spilly MWF 11-11:50 Spring 

NBTS B-422 

The Book of Isaiah 1-39 

This book will be studied attempting to 
establish its historical setting, the personality of 
the author, the structure and the form of the 
text, as well as the content and theology of the 
books. Prerequisite: NBTS Old Testament I, II 
and Theology or equivalent. 
Bjornard MWF 2: 10-3 Fall 

NBTS B-423 

The Book of Isaiah 40-66 

This book will be studied attempting to 

establish its historical setting, the personality of 

the author, the structure and the form of the 

text, as well as the content and theology of the 

book. Prerequisite: Old Testament I, II and 

Theology or equivalent. 

Bjornard MWF 2: 10-3 Winter 

CTS CH-410 

Exegesis of the Old Testament II 

An exegetical study of an Old Testament book 
or part thereof. The knowledge of Hebrew is 
not prerequisite, but reference is made in an un- 
derstandable way to the original terminology of 



the text under consideration. In 1978, Isaiah 56- 

66. 

Lacocque MW 10: 30-12 Winter 

JSTC B-401 

Pre-exilic Prophets and Social Concerns 

A consideration of the social dimension of 
ministry as this is modeled in the prophets 
Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, andMicah, and embraced 
in the social teachings of the Church. The 
discussions on the stance of ministry today will 
be focused in the context of the prophetic 
teaching and the prophetic mission. 
Kenik/Tuite TTh 1-2:15 Winter 

BTS B-427 
Jeremiah 

A study of the book which stands between the 
times of reformation and defeat, of rebirth and 
decay, and of judgment and hope. The 
following topics will be examined : prophet and 
institution; a theology of failure; the com- 
munity in exile; prophetic lament and prayer; 
the enemy; the true and false prophet; and the 
hope of the New Covenant. 
Roop Th 7-9 :30 pm Spring 

MTS B-417 
Jeremiah 

A exegetical and theological inquiry into the 
book of the Judean agonizing prophet of 
Jerusalem, 626-582 B.C. Knowledge of Hebrew 
will be useful but is not required. May be 
augmented for Th.M. purposes. 
Campbell Tu7-10pm Winter 

JSTC B-402 
Theology for Exiles 

An exploration of the responses of the Israelite 
community to the crisis of faith in face of the 
Babylonian exile as this is expressed in Jeremiah, 
Lamentations, DTR, 'P', Ezekiel, II Isaiah and 
Job. Basic to the discussions will be a con- 
sideration of the viability of these responses for 
contemporary situations of exile. 
Kenik MTh 2-3:15 Fall 

CTU B-415 

Evolving Forms of Prophecy in Later Israel 

Key passages from Ezekiel, Deutero-Isaiah and 
some post-exilic prophets will be studied within 
the context of ancient Israel and for their value 
in struggling with traditions and adapting them 
to new theological or pastoral situations. Im- 
portant for appreciating the Old Testament 
basis of priesthood and church, suffering, 
redemption and re-creation. 
Stuhlmueller Tu 7-9 :30 pm Fall 



54 



Biblical Studies: Old Testament 



CTU B-495 

Bible Exegeted and Preached : Prophecy 

Key passages from Ezekiel and Deutero-Isaiah 
will be analyzed to appreciate the role of these 
prophets during the transitional age of the exile 
and to bring their challenge into the preaching 
ministry of the Church. One-half of the time 
will be given to student preaching of three 
biblical homilies based on the texts under 
discussion. Some lab session outside of class 
will be required. Limited to 15 students, 
preferably with background in public speaking. 
With approval of professors. (May be ap- 
plicable to CTU preaching requirement) 
Baumer/Stuhlmueller TTh 12-1:15 Fall 

JSTC B-403 

Biblical Themes: Creation vs. Salvation 

An exploration of creation theology as this per- 
vades the Old Testament and in contrast to 
salvation theology. Consideration will be given 
to the dignity of the human person, one's 
creaturehood and relationship with the Creator, 
one's freedom and responsibility within the or- 
der of creation. 
Kenik MTh 2-3:15 Spring 

CTU B-470 

Priesthood and Religious Leadership 

Origins and evolution of the models of religious 
leadership in ancient Judaism (charismatic, 
prophetic, priestly, sapiential and royal) and in 
early Christianity (apostolic, prophetic, 
charismatic and presbyteral). Analysis of the in- 
terplay of charism and office. The significance 
of these models for the Church of today and 
tomorrow. 
Osiek/Stuhlmueller Tu 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

CTU B-490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

The attitude of the Bible towards the outside 
world will be investigated for direction in the 
world mission of the Church today. In the Old 
Testament special attention will be devoted to 
the cultural and moral interdependent of Israel 
with the nations as well as to such motifs as 
election, universal salvation and monotheism. 
New Testament study will focus on the mission 
of Jesus and its interpretation in the theologies 
of select Gospels, Pauline Letters and other New 
Testament writings. 
Senior/ Stuhlmueller MW2-3:15 Fall 

MTS B-471 

The Archaeology of Palestine and the 

Bible 

An exploration of the findings of archaeology in 



Palestine as they pertain to the Bible. Attention 
is given to the inter-relationship of archaeology, 
history and Old Testament religion. Prerequi- 
site: MTS B-301 and/or B-302 or equivalent. 
Campbell M 7-10 pm Spring 

DIT B-501 

Models of Biblical Interpretation 

An attempt to put contemporary biblical in- 
terpretation in historical perspective: examines 
the hermeneutics of the early Church (use of OT 
in the NT, midrashic tendencies), patristic use of 
the Scriptures, the impact of modern criticism 
on the traditional interpretation, contemporary 
trends. Lecture, discussion, and student presen- 
tations. Offered in response to student interest. 
Walsh TBAr Winter 

LSTC B-500 

Old Testament Pericopes 

The practice of completing exegetical work 
before teaching or preparing a sermon on a 
biblical text is a lifelong and sacred obligation. 
This seminar provides an opportunity to shar- 
pen the skills necessary for textual criticism and 
literary, historical, theological and her- 
meneutical analysis, with or without a 
knowledge of Hebrew. The pericopes will be 
chosen from the new lectionary. Prerequisite: 
LSTC B-310 and B-311 or equivalent. 
Michel TTh 10:45-12 Fall 

DIT B-517 

The Psalms in the Cultic Tradition of the Bible 

This course studies the cultic tradition in the 
Bible from the Priestly Tradition to the 
liturgical influences in the New Testament. 
Major attention is paid to the Psalms as an ex- 
pression of Israel's cult and as influencing 
Christian worship. Individual Psalms are 
studied from the standpoint of literary form and 
content. Their place and use in the cultic life of 
Israel is investigated. A synthesis of the prin- 
cipal theological axes is developed during the 
course. A final section deals with the use of the 
Psalms in the liturgical service of the Christian 
Church. Book reports are required, as is a 
scholarly paper or participation in a discussion 
group with laymen. Prerequisites: DIT B-341 or 
equivalent and survey courses in Old 
Testament. 
Fischer TBAr Spring 

DIT B-546 

The Wisdom Tradition 

A study of the historical origins of the Wisdom 
Tradition, the literary forms employed, and the 
development of this tradition in both the Old 




55 



Biblical Studies: New Testament 



Testament and the New Testament. Attention 
will be paid to the main theological axes. 
Prerequisites: DIT B-341 or equivalent and sur- 
vey courses in Old Testament and New 
Testament. Offered in response to student in- 
terest. 
Fischer TBAr Winter 

LSTC B-512 
Studies in Jeremiah 

Consideration of the contents and message of 
the book, with attention given to critical 
problems and issues affecting Old Testament 
prophecy in general. Prerequisite: LSTC B-310 
and B-311 or equivalent. 
Fuerst TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU B-518 
Intertestamental Literature 

A seminar on Jewish literature from the Mac- 
cabean period to the Bar Kochba revolt. Em- 
phasis will be placed on apocalyptic literature 
and the Dead Sea Scrolls as well as on the im- 
portance of these writings for understanding 
Christian origins and the development of the 
New Testament. Reading of primary sources in 
translation and discussion of them in their 
historical, cultural, and religious context. Ad- 
mission by approval of instructor. 
Spilly W 7-9:30 pm Spring 

DIT B-541 (2 or 3 QH) 
The Bible and Ethics 

A seminar examining the biblical basis of ethical 
studies. The course will investigate two foci: the 
legal tradition and the wisdom tradition. 
Materials will be taken from both the Old 
Testament and the New Testament. 
Prerequisites: DIT B-442, 443; B-450, 451; B- 
417 or similar courses. 
Fischer TBAr Fall 

DIT B-590 (2 or 3 QH) 
Special Topics 

Tutorials in various biblical topics are offered 
from time to time in response to student in- 
terest. They will be noted as they are taught un- 
der this number. Contact Professor for subject. 
Fischer /Walsh TBAr TBAr 

LSTC B-601 

Graduate Biblical Seminar 

Graduate students in the biblical field will make 
presentations based on their specialized interests 
and scholarly research. The method of the 
seminar will be to distribute, discuss and 
critically examine the papers of class par- 
ticipants. (For post-M.Div. students. Admission 



of others by approval of instructor.) 
Fuerst Th 2-4:30 



Winter 



LSTC B-610 
Studies in Job 

The course will provide an opportunity (1) to 
study the book of Job in the light of the most 
recent insights into Hebrew poetry which have 
been gained from the study of Northwest 
Semitic languages and literatures, especially 
from the Ugaritic mythological and epic 
materials, and (2) to strive for an understanding 
of the content, meaning and importance of Job 
as a part of the Hebrew Bible. (For post-M.Div. 
students. Admission of others by approval of 
instructor.) 
Michel TTh 12:30-1:45 Spring 

MTS B-609 

Person and People in the Old Testament 

Ancient Israel's formative times were alive with 
new perspectives on the individual person in 
societal situations. Human beings bound them- 
selves to God and to one another, praised and 
complained, expressed joy and sorrow, in 
revolutionary circumstances. The focus in this 
course will be on what contemporary 
ministry — also in revolutionary times — can 
receive as resources from the persons and the 
peoplehood of the Old Testament. 
Campbell Jan. 9-13, TBAn Winter 

MTS B-607 

Preaching from the Old Testament 

This course centers in five days of intensive work 
preceded by reading and preaching, followed by 
preaching with evaluation in dialogue. The 
course is designed to serve both theoretical and 
practical needs, with special attention to re- 
sources for Old Testament exegesis and interpre- 
tation in preaching. 
Boling July 11-15, TBAn Summer 



B. NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-330 

Introduction to the New Testament 

This course is designed to give the student an in- 
troduction to the life, times, and message of the 
New Testament as the basis for further study 
and use. The total range of backgrounds, con- 
text, text, canon, history of interpretation, and 
translation of the New Testament will come un- 
der study. 
Snyder MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Spring 



56 



Biblical Studies: New Testament 



CTS CH- 321 

The Synoptic Gospels 

A study of the thought of the authors of the 
Gospels and of the oral traditions which they 
used. An attempt will be made to discover which 
traditions give evidence of the authentic 
historical ministry of Jesus. 
Scroggs TTh 10:30-12 Spring 

CTS CH-322 

Beginnings of Christian Theology 

A study of the history and thought of early 
Christianity from the emergence of the resurrec- 
tion faith to the early decades of the Second 
Century. 
Scroggs WF 1:30-3 Fall 

CTU B-305 

New Testament Introduction 

The writings of the New Testament will be 
presented in their historical, cultural, religious 
and sociological context. Introduction to the 
methodological tools employed in New 
Testament research and to the diverse theologies 
that comprise the New Testament witness to 
Jesus of Nazareth. Especially designed for those 
beginning a program of theological study or for 
those seeking a foundational knowledge of the 
New Testament for personal or professional 
enrichment. 

Senior M 7-9:30 pm Winter 

Osiek MW2-3:15 Winter 

JSTC B-307 
Pauline Writings 

Paul will be studied as a model of ministry : per- 
sonality, cultural background, call and mission, 
strategy with the Corinthians. Each of his 
writings will be viewed in its. historical setting 
and background. Key concepts of Pauline 
theology will be explored: death and resurrec- 
tion, body of Christ, salvation history, law and 
freedom, justification. Format will include lec- 
tures, readings, discussion and short written 
assignments. 
Thompson MTh 2-3 : 15 Fall 

JSTC B-304 

The Gospel according to Mark 

The course will first examine the background of 
the gospel in the historical life of Jesus and the 
development of early Christian traditions. 
Special attention will be given to the geography 
of Palestine, to the historical circumstances 
which surrounded the development of the 
gospel, to the quest for the historical Jesus as 
well as to the various modes of traditional trans- 



mission and development. The Gospel ac- 
cording to Mark will then be presented as a 
literary, theological and pastoral response to the 
needs of the Markan community. Individual 
pericopes will be studied in themselves as well 
as in relation to the gospel's over-all context. 
Finally, the gospel will be viewed in light of the 
needs of the Church today. Format will include 
lectures, discussion, readings and short written 
assignments. 
LaVerdiere TTh 10 : 30-11 : 45 Winter 

JSTC B-303 
Matthew and Luke 

An introduction to the creative interpretations 
of the gospel of Jesus provided by Matthew and 
Luke. It will explore the basic structure, 
movement, theology and pastoral intent of these 
writings. Emphasis will be placed on these 
writings as dramatic narrative, thereby enabling 
the students to move through a critical study to 
a post-critical religious apprecation. 
Correlations will be made with our present ex- 
perience, and the implications of such 
correlations for ministry will be explored. 
Prerequisite: JSTC B-304 or equivalent. Format 
will include lectures, readings, personal reflec- 
tion, discussion and short written assignments. 
La Verdiere/Thompson TTh 10 : 30-11 : 45 Spring 

LSTC B-330 

Survey of Biblical Studies 

This course is intended for students needing a 
basic introduction to the Bible and its content. 
Reading of the Bible will be supplemented with 
information on biblical times, geography 
and history. 
Norquist TTh 8 : 30-9 : 45 Fall 

LSTC B-331 
Gospel Tradition 

A study of the history of Gospel interpretation 
and the various strata underlying the present 
Gospel tradition. Development of critical 
method of Gospel studies and review of 
problems in contemporary Gospel research. 
Voobus MWF 11-11:50 Winter 

LSTC B-332 
Pauline Tradition 

A study of the composition and content of the 
genuine Pauline epistles, placing them within 
their historical setting. Basic theological and 
ethical themes of Paul will be investigated. 
Norquist TTh 10:45-12 Spring 




57 



Biblical Studies: New Testament 



MTS B-302 
Jesus 

Introduction to the life and teaching of Jesus as 
determined by modern scholarship. Special at- 
tention to methods of analysis. Recommended 
as a first course in the New Testament. 
Collins/Reeves MW2-3:50 Winter 

MTS B-313 
Paul 

Introduction to the generative insights of Paul, 
his letters and the historical contexts of the let- 
ters. 
Hilgert M 7-10 pm Fall 

NBTS B-331 

New Testament Studies I : Gospels 

This course is designed to provide a basis on 
which continued and deepening fruitful study of 
the New Testament can be built. It introduces 
students to the context and content of these 
major New Testament documents, as well as to 
the methodological issues involved in their 
study and their major theological themes. 
Brauch MWF 11:30-12:20 Fall 

NBTS B-332 

New Testament Studies II: Acts/Pauline 

Epistles 

This course is designed to provide a basis on 
which continued and deepening fruitful study of 
the New Testament can be built. It introduces 
students to the context and content of these 
major New Testament documents, as well as to 
the methodological issues involved in their 
study and their major theological themes. 
Borchert TTh 8-9:20 Spring 

BTS B-332 

New Testament Theology 

A study of the various theologies of the New 
Testament with special emphasis on Paul and 
John. The course is also designed to demon- 
strate the role of the books of the New 
Testament in the several theological traditions. 
Snyder WF 8-9:20 Fall 

JSTC B-301 

Religious Experience in the Gospel of John 

We will actively listen to the gospel of John, 
correlating what we hear with our own ex- 
perience and that of others and reflecting on 
what implications this correlation might have 
for our ministry. We will study the process by 
which Jesus reveals himself to men and women 
and their responses as models of faith and un- 
belief, how Jesus reveals himself as the 
replacement of the principal Jewish feasts, the 



themes of light/darkness and death/life, and the 
Johannine portrayal of the Last Supper, the 
passion, death and resurrection. Students need 
not have had courses in Scripture, but will be 
expected to do assigned readings, personal 
reflection, active participation in discussion and 
short written assignments. 
Thompson M 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

MTS H-312 

Critical History of the Spanish Bible 

For course description consult Historical 

Studies: Modern offerings. 

Jorge Gonzalez March 13-17, TBAn Winter 

CTU 1-315 

Interpretation and Ministry 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 
Integrative Studies offerings. 
Osiek/Schreiter MW 12-1: 15 Spring 

Osiek/Schreiter MW2-3:15 Spring 

DIT B-450 
Gospel Literature I 

This course surveys the content of Mark and 
Matthew. It also illustrates the methodologies of 
biblical exegesis with special emphasis on the 
basics of methodology and then on Form 
Criticism. Book reports and a scholarly paper 
are required. In place of the paper some students 
are offered an opportunity of translating 
academic work into popular communication by 
participation in lay discussion groups. 
Prerequisites: DIT B-341 or equivalent. 
Walsh MWF 8: 10-9 Winter 

DIT B-451 

Gospel Literature II 

This course surveys the content of Luke and 
John. It also aids the student to improve his use 
of methodologies of biblical exegesis, including 
Redaction Criticism and Wisdom Methodology. 
Requirements are the same as for DIT B-450. 
Prerequisites: DIT B-341 and B-450 or 
equivalent. 
Walsh MWF 9: 10-10 Spring 

CTU B-430 

The Gospel According to Matthew 

A study of the content, structure, and major 
motifs of the Gospel of Matthew. Particular at- 
tention will be given to the evangelist's role as 
an interpreter of tradition and history for a 
community in transition. The course will con- 
sider the theological and ministerial relevance of 
Matthew's message for such questions as Church 
authority and ethics. 
Senior M W 2-3 : 15 Win ter 



58 



Biblical Studies: New Testament 



CTU B-435 

The Gospel According to Luke 

An analysis of the entire Gospel and its major 
theological themes. Particular attention will be 
given to the evangelist's role as interpreter of the 
Jesus tradition for a missionary community. The 
course will consider the theological and 
ministerial relevance of Luke's message for such 
questions as poor and rich, church leadership, 
and prayer. 
Karris TTh 9-10:15 Spring 

CTU B-440 

The Gospel According to John 

The gospel will be studied according to its 
distinctive style and theology, its overall struc- 
ture and content. Key sections will be used to 
highlight such major Johannine motifs as 
religious symbolism, sacraments, community 
and spirituality. 

Karris MWF 12-12: 50 Fall 

Senior Tu 7-9 :30 pm Spring 

MTS B-401 

The Gospel of John 

An exegesis course, with attention to the book's 
literary problems, its affinities with Hellenistic 
and Jewish traditions, its place in the developing 
thought of the early Church and the significance 
of its symbolic language and theology for the 
Christian faith today. 
Collins MW 6-8 pm Spring 

NBTS B-470 
Gospel of John 

Consists of: a study of historical critical issues 
raised by the Gospel; its purpose, structure and 
key themes; and an examination of represen- 
tative texts with a view to understanding the 
major theological concerns and challenge of the 
Gospel. The final purpose is the discovery of the 
impact of the Johannine understanding of Jesus 
for Christian faith and ministry. (Prerequisite: 
New Testament core courses) 
Borchert TTh 8-9:20 Winter 

CTS CH-424 

The Theology of John 

A study of the thought of the most radical 
thinker of the New Testament, through a study 
of the "plot" of the Gospel. 
Scroggs WF3:30-5 Winter 

MTS B-402 

The Acts of the Apostles 

An exegesis course. Some of the themes with 
which the course will be concerned: How does 
Luke mold together tradition, history and his 



own original composition to reflect a developing 
theology and mission in the first century? What 
contributions does he himself make to the early 
church's understanding of itself? What can this 
mean for Christians today? 
Hilgert MW 2-4 Spring 

CTU B-452 

Pauline Theology and Writings 

The life and thought of Paul in his cultural and 
theological setting. Study of such Pauline motifs 
as law and freedom, charism and Spirit, death 
and resurrection, Church and apostleship — 
and their import for the contemporary church. 
Osiek TTh 10:30-11:45 Fall 

Karris MWF 9-9:50 Winter 

DIT B-415 

Selected Pauline Epistles 

This course attempts to give a survey of Pauline 
Epistles within an historical context. Special at- 
tention will be paid to I Cor., Rom., and Eph. 
Emphasis will be placed on the literary form of 
Pauline Epistles and the development of a 
methodology for interpreting the Epistles. Book 
reports and a scholarly paper are required. As 
an alternative to the paper, opportunity will be 
offered to some students for translating their 
academic work into popular communication by 
participation in lay discussion groups. 
Prerequisites: DITB-341 or equivalent. 
Fischer/Walsh MWF 10:10-11 Winter 

BTS B-434 

First and Second Corinthians 

Selections from the Corinthian correspondence 
in order to study the life and faith of Paul and 
the nature of the apostolic church, as such a 
study relates to the church of the twentieth cen- 
tury. 
Snyder MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Win ter 

NBTS B-437 

Greek Exegesis, Ephesians 

A study of the book of Ephesians using the 

Greek text. (Prerequisite: NBTS N.T. Studies I, 

II, III, or equivalent and/or one year beginning 

Greek.) 

Brauch Th 9:30-12 Winter 

BTS B-413 

Greek Exegesis : James 

A study of the book of James according to the 
Greek text. Prerequisites: Elements of New 
Testament Greek and the Greek of the New 
Testament or equivalent. 
Horning W 3-5: 30 Fall 




59 



Biblical Studies: New Testament 



MTS B-417 
Revelation of John 

An exegesis course. The history of in- 
terpretation will be reviewed briefly to highlight 
the basic exegetical options. The goal of the 
course is to understand the book in its historical 
context and to sense the universal significance of 
its mythic and symbolic language. 
Collins F 9-12 Winter 

NBTS B-431 

New Testament Theology 

The goals of this course are: 1) to introduce im- 
portant themes in N.T. theology; 2) to in- 
troduce major texts for understanding key 
themes in N.T. theology; 3) to provide models 
for exegeting N.T. texts; 4) to effect awareness of 
and acquaintance with significant literature in 
the field of N.T. theology. The focus 
throughout the course — in the treatment of 
themes and texts — is on the dynamic of "unity 
and diversity" in N.T. theology. Prerequisite: a 
basic course in N.T. Introduction. 
Brauch MW8-9:20 Fall 

CCTS B-411 

Symbol and Myth in the Bible 

Modern biblical studies, expecially text-, source-, 
form- and redaction- criticism, have succeeded 
in expressing many historical and literary aspects 
of the Bible. But they have failed to express a 
religious appreciation of the text in its symbolic 
and mythological depths. In this course we will 
address this issue by critically examining the 
other major approaches to the Bible, by ex- 
ploring fundamental experiences of appreciation 
in our culture, by interpreting biblical texts in 
post-critical religious fashion, by formulating 
the interpretative principles in practice. Students 
are expected to have completed basic 300-level 
courses in Bible and theology. Their respon- 
sibilities will include assigned readings, personal 
reflection, active participation in discussion and 
an original piece of work. 
Reeves/W. Thompson TTh 10 : 45-12 : 30 Fall 

MTS B-410 

New Testament Interpretation in the Hispanic 

Context 

The themes and content of the New Testament 
as understood by Hispanic interpreters past and 
present. An approach with the needs of the 
Hispanic in mind. 
Weiss M 7-10 pm Fall 



CTU 1-439 (2 full courses) 
Christology 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 

Integrative Studies offerings. 

Schreiter/Senior TTh 10 : 30-11 : 45 Fall/Winter 

LSTC B-447 

Salvation in the New Testament 

The principal metaphors of redemption used in 
the New Testament are explored for their 
historical background and their use in various 
New Testament writings. Of particular concern 
is their significance for determining the nature 
of the early church and its life. 
Norquist TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

LSTC B-442 

Resurrection in the New Testament 

This course consists of an exegetical study of the 

resurrection tradition in I Corinthians 15 and 

the resurrection narratives in the Gospels. 

Special attention is given to the question of the 

significance of the resurrection for Christian 

faith. 

Norquist MWF9-9:50 Spring 

LSTC B-443 

Ethical Teachings of the Evangelists 

A study of the conception of the Christian life 
according to the four evangelists, including both 
the approach of each of the evangelists to the 
question and their concrete directions for 
Christian behavior. 
Norquist MWF 12-12: 50 Fall 

CTS CH-437 

The Social Reality of the Early Church 

A study of the interpenetration of theology and 
the social milieu in the early church. Con- 
centration will be placed upon the political, 
economic, and sociological situations which im- 
pinged upon Christian groups. Prerequisite: 
CTS CH-321 or equivalent. 
Scroggs W 7-10 pm Spring 

CCTS 1-425 

Can the Church Be Christian? 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 

Integrative Studies offerings. 

W. Thompson/ Bur kh art W 2-5 Winter 

CTU B-490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

For course description consult Old Testament 

offerings. 

Senior/Stuhlmueller MW2-3:15 Fall 



60 



Biblical Studies: New Testament 



JSTC B-410 

Ministries in the New Testament 

The course will examine the origins and 
development of ministries in light of the internal 
needs and of the external missionary expansion 
of the early Church. Special attention will be 
given to the role of the assembly and to the 
origins of the Eucharist in the shaping and the 
diversification of various roles of Christian 
leadership. Relevant texts from the New 
Testament, from other early Christian literature 
as well as from contemporary Jewish literature 
will provide the sources for this investigation. 
Format will include lectures, discussion, 
readings and short written assignments. 
LaVerdiere W 2-5 Fall 

CTU B-470 

Priesthood and Religious Leadership 

For course description consult Old Testament 

offerings . 

Osiek/Stuhlmueller Tu 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

MTS B-499 or 599 
Independent Study 

Collins, Hilgert or Reeves By arrangement 

BTS B-532 

Seminar on Interpretation of the New 

Testament 

The seminar will focus bpth on the ways the 
New Testament has been interpreted throughout 
the church's history and on developing a model 
of interpretation for the life of the church today. 
Special emphasis will be given to the correlation 
of historical-critical method with Bible study 
oriented to human transformation, personal and 
social. In the second half of the seminar, each 
participant will guide the group through the 
study of a particular New Testament text, in 
which she or he will demonstrate a workable 
model of interpretation. Prerequisite: In- 
troduction to the New Testament and/ or New 
Testament Theology. Enrollment limited to 10. 
Gardner M 7-9:30 pm Spring 

LSTC B-537 

The Gospel Pericopes 

Prerequisite: LSTC B-331 or equivalent. 
Voobus MWF 11-11:50 Fall 

NBTS B-560 
Parables of Jesus 

A study of the parables in terms of the history 
of their interpretation, their place in the 
ministry of Jesus and their significance for the 
church. Prerequisite: New Testament core cour- 
ses and at least one 400-level course. 
Brauch MWF 11 : 30-12 : 20 Win ter 



CTU B-532 

Faith and Suffering: The Gospel Accounts 

of the Death of Jesus 

This seminar will examine the Passion 
narratives in the four gospels to appreciate how 
each gospel community was able to reflect on 
the death of Jesus in the light of its traditions 
and faith experience. Participants in the seminar 
will use the skills of form and redaction criticism 
to analyze the gospel texts and to evaluate their 
potential for contemporary proclamation. 
Senior TTh 12-1:15 Spring 

LSTC B-536 

Kingdom of God in the Synoptic Gospels 

This course attempts to determine the meaning 
of the term Kingdom of God as it was used by 
Jesus and the synoptic evangelists. Its 
background in prophecy and apocalyptic is ex- 
plored. The relationship of Kingdom of God to 
the church and to Christian living is investigated 
in some depth. Prerequisite: LSTC B-331 or 
equivalent. 
Norquist MWF 9-9: 50 Winter 

DIT B-552 
Johannine Literature 

Selected passages for the Gospel of John and the 
Johannine Epistles. Attention will be given to 
problems of literary and theological 
background, to the literary structuring of the 
Johannine writings, and in particular to the 
theology that emerges from these writings. 
Walsh TBAr Fall 

BTS B-531 
Romans 

Extensive use will be made of the expanding 
body of literature devoted to the exposition of 
this epistle. Special studies will concentrate on 
major biblical and theological themes. 
Wieand Th 8-10:30 Fall 

CTS CH-521 

New Testament Seminar I : Paul's Epistle to 

the Romans 

An exegetical study of the major writing of the 

Apostle. Prerequisite: CTS CH-321 or 

equivalent. 

Scroggs Tu 7-10 pm Fall 

DIT B-531 (2 or 3 QH) 
The General Epistles 

A study of the Epistles which do not fall into the 
'main lines' of the New Testament thought: 1 & 
2 Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews. Special at- 
tention will be given to the Old Testament in- 
terpretation and Christian theology in the 




61 



Biblical Studies: Biblical Languages 



Epistle to the Hebrews. 
Walsh TBAr 



Spring 



offerings. 
Fuerst 



Th 2-4:30 



Winter 



CTUB-599 

MA Seminar : The Apocalypse 

The seminar will investigate the literary genre 
and socio-political context of the Apocalypse as 
well as its structure and theology. Particular 
emphasis will be given to the method used in 
studying apocalyptic literature. Prerequisites: 
New Testament Introduction and a working 
knowledge of New Testament Greek. 
Karris/Senior/Spilly M 7-9:30 pm Spring 

DIT B-533 (2 QH) 
Resurrection in New Testament 

A seminar focusing on the Resurrection 
tradition and its articulation in New Testament 
texts. Some attention is also given to con- 
temporary Resurrection theology. 
Walsh TBAr Winter 

CTS CH-522 

New Testament Seminar II : New Testament 

Ethics 

A study of the different structures and contents 
of ethical positions in the early church. 
Prerequisite: CTS CH-321 or equivalent. 
Scroggs Tu7-10pm Winter 

CTU B-576 

The Ministry of Women in the Early Church 

For a fuller understanding of the Church and its 
total ministry, this course will explore the 
variety of roles exercised by women in the early 
Church from the Apostolic to the Constantinian 
Age, with special focus on the interpretation of 
Pauline passages about women and the impact 
of the texts of contemporary thinking regarding 
women in ministry. Critical analysis of texts by 
students will be stressed. 
Osiek Th 2-4:30 Fall 

LSTC B-620 

The Legacy of Bultmann 

A seminar which will investigate Bultmann's 
background and spiritual ancestry, his work in 
New Testament exegesis and theology, the con- 
troversies caused by his hermeneutic, the in- 
fluence of his theology, and the present status of 
the most significant issues. For post-M.Div. 
students. Admission of others by approval of in- 
structor. 
Linss M 7-10 pm Fall 

LSTC B-601 

Graduate Biblical Seminar 

For course description consult Old Testament 



MTS B-612 

Interpreting the New Testament for Persons 

and the Congregation 

Traditionally, the New Testament has been in- 
terpreted with the use of historical tools. This 
course is an attempt to bring a fresh approach 
to the New Testament. The significance of myth 
and symbol for disclosing the relation between a 
transcendental realm and human being will be 
developed. The primary texts will be I Corin- 
thians and the Gospel of Mark. 
Reeves May 17-21, TBAn Spring 



C. LANGUAGES 

BTS B-311A 
Hebrew I 

The elementary aspects of Hebrew will be 
treated with the expectation that the student 
will gain knowledge of the strong verb and of 
the uses of the article, the adjective, the demon- 
stratives, pronouns, and nouns. Exercises and 
readings will be based on biblical Hebrew taken 
from Genesis 1-3 with translation helps. 
TBAn MWF 1 : 10-2 Fall 

BTS B-311B 
Hebrew II 

Emphasis will be given to the weak verbs and 
the acquisition of a working vocabulary for 
reading Hebrew narrative. 
TBAn MWF 1:10-2 Winter 

BTS B-311C 
Hebrew III 

The concern of the course is to develop the skills 
of the student in Hebrew reading with sup- 
plementary work in Hebrew syntax. 
TBAn MWF 1:10-2 Spring 

DIT B-301, 304, 307 (3 full courses) 
Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Hebrew 

Staff TBAr Upon Request 

LSTC B-300 
Elementary Hebrew I 

In this course the students will become familiar 
with the essential vocabulary used in biblical 
Hebrew and gain a working knowledge of 
Hebrew grammar, thus acquiring the fun- 
damental exegetical tool for a first hand study 
and understanding of the Bible. 
Michel TTh 12:30-1:45 Fall 



62 



Biblical Studies: Judaic Studies 



MTS B-321, 322 (2 full courses) 
Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis I, II 

A non-divisible two quarter sequence involving 
the learning of the elements of Hebrew grammar 
on the basis of T. O. Lambdin's Grammar, 
followed by translation and exegesis of selected 
portions of the Hebrew Bible, primarily prose. 
Attention will be given to fundamentals of text 
criticism and general principles of biblical in- 
terpretation. 

Boling MTWTh8-8:50 Winter 

Boling MTWTh 9-9:50 Spring 

LSTC B-200 (0 for LSTC, full course for others) 
New Testament Greek 

A programmed study of the Greek of the New 
Testament, using the language lab and aiming at 
the utilizing of the language in exegesis. 
Linss/Hall MWF 8-8: 50 Fall 

DIT B-322, 323 (2 full courses) 
Beginning and Advanced Greek 

Staff TBAr Winter/ Spring 

MTS B-324, 325 (2 full courses) 
Introduction to New Testament Greek I, II 

A non-divisible two quarter study of elementary 
Greek grammar, practice in translation, with in- 
troductory attention to exegesis. 
Reeves Fall/Winter 

MTWTh 9-9 : 50 (section at 8-8 : 50 if nee . ) 

BTS/NBTS B-316A, B, C (3 full courses) 
New Testament Greek 

In this course the student acquires a knowledge 
of the elements of grammar, a working 
vocabulary, and skill in translation of the Greek 
New Testament. Selections from the Gospels, 
Acts, Paul and the General Epistles will be read. 
TBAn MWF 1:10-2 Fall/Winter/Spring 

MTS B-421 

Intermediate New Testament Greek 

Prerequisite: MTS B-324/325 or equivalent. 
Reeves By arrangement 

D. JUDAIC STUDIES 

CTU E-489 

Introduction to Jewish Ethics 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Pawlikowski W 7-9 :30 pm Fall 

CTU B-518 
Intertestamental Literature 

For course description consult Old Testament 

offerings. 

Spilly W 7-9 : 30 pm Spring 



CTU B-526 

Rabbinic Judaism and the Early Church 

Designed to deepen the student's understanding 
of the relationship of Christianity to rabbinic 
Judaism and to develop a capacity to interpret 
Jewish sources, this seminar will serve as an op- 
portunity to examine the nature of rabbinic 
Judaism and the rabbinic mind through an ex- 
ploration of pertinent talmudic and midrashic 
material. 
Perelmuter Th 2-4:30 Winter 

CTU B-520 

Liturgy of the Synagogue I 

The tri-partite course on the Liturgy of the 
Synagogue — over a two year period — surveys 
worship forms in the contemporary American 
Synagogue with special reference to the com- 
mon thread and variations in the Jewish 
denominations: Orthodox, Conservative, and 
Reform. This first section deals with the weekly 
synagogue service. 
Perelmuter TBAr Winter/ Spring 

CTU B-521 

Liturgy of the Synagogue II 

The liturgy of the High Holy Days: Rosh 
Hashanah, Yom Kippur, (Text: Agnon, Days of 
Awe (Shocken). 
Perelmuter TBAr Winter/ Spring 

CTU B-522 

Liturgy of the Synagogue III 

Liturgy of the pilgrim festivals: Passover, 

Shabuoth (Pentecost), Sukkoth. 

Perelmuter TBAr Winter/Spring 

CTU B-529 

Jewish Mysticism and Messianism 
A close examination of the mystical substratum 
of Jewish historical and religious experience 
through an indepth study of the messianic 
movements in Judaism from the talmudic period 
up to and including the Sabbatai Sevi. This 
course will trace the stream of mystical thought 
and experience through the examination of per- 
tinent historical texts and source material. 
Perelmuter Th 2-4:30 Spring 

II. HISTORICAL STUDIES 

A. GENERAL 
MTS H-303 
Uses of the Christian Past 

An inquiry into the role of historical un- 
derstanding in establishing Christian identity in 
the present. Selected events and doctrines will 
be examined in order to discover what light can 




63 



Historical Studies 



be thrown on them by historical investigation. 

Recommended as a first course in church 

history. 

Rigdon/Schafer MWll-1 Winter 

BTS H-349 

Research Methods in Church History 

Practical training in research techniques and 
sharpening of the critical spirit through guidance 
on individual projects. 
Wagner Th 9:30-12 Spring 

MTS M-408 

Teaching Church History in the Congregation 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 

Religious Education offerings. 

Priester/Schafer TTh 11-1 Winter 

MTS H-499 or 599 
Independent Study 

Rigdon or Schafer 



By Arrangement 



DIT H-590 (2 or 3 QH) 

Directed Readings in Church History 

Individual readings. Registration by special per- 
mission only. 
Hartenbach TBAr TBAr 

B. EARLY 

BTS H-341 

Early Christianity: Clement to Constantine 

An historical study of the growth of early 
Christianity and the emergence of Catholic 
tradition. The formative period of the church 
will be studied in its political and cultural con- 
text through lectures, group discussions and 
audio-visual presentations. 
Wagner WF8-9:20 Fall 

CTS CH-341 

Christianity in the World: The History of 

the Christian People I 

This course, designed specifically for those who 
have had little or no church history, seeks to 
depict and interpret the Christian community's 
development in interaction with the world. Lec- 
tures and discussions will center upon key 
figures, critical events, forces of change and reac- 
tion, and the main conceptions which have 
defined the character of the Christian com- 
munity in its interaction with successive stages 
of our culture from the early church through the 
early medieval developments. 
Manschreck MF 10:30-12 Winter 

CTUH-300 l 
Early Christianity 

The development of doctrine and practice to 450 



A.D. Lecture topics will include Trinitarian 
dogma, the person and work of Christ , the 
relation between human freedom and divine 
grace, and the development of sacramental 
practice. Required readings in primary materials 
will concentrate on Christian life and 
spirituality. Reading reports and examinations. 
Burns MWF 12-12:50 Fall 

DIT H-307 

History of the Church to 700 A.D. 

An introduction to patristic thought, especially 
as it applies to major beliefs of the Christian 
religion. A survey of the socio-political climate 
of the period and the effect it had on the develop- 
ment of Church structures. 
Hartenbach MWF 9:10-10 Fall 

JSTC H-315 

The Early Church 

A study of selected texts, stressing the rule of 

faith, church order, mission, conciliar decisions, 

and the church's interaction with ancient 

society. Readings and discussion, with a paper. 

Wicks TTh 10:30-11:45 Fall 

LSTC H-310A 

Ancient and Medieval Church History 

The developing life and thought of the Christian 

church, presented in broad perspective. Lectures 

and group discussions of selected source 

readings. 

Fischer MWF 11-11:50 Fall 

NBTS H-341 

Church History I: Early and Medieval 

Christianity 

Major issues and developments in Christian life 
and thought from the beginning of the second 
century to the Reformation are examined in or- 
der (1) to become familiar with the development 
of Christianity during this period, (2) to acquire 
some knowledge of historical methodology, and 
(3) to develop some ability at analyzing and in- 
terpreting religious movements. Regular and in- 
tensive reading, both in primary and secondary 
sources, is emphasized as a basis for meaningful 
classroom discussion. 
TBAn TTh 8-9:20 Fall 

JSTC H-415 

Ancient Christian Spirituality 

A reading seminar using primary materials to 
examine issues of Christian life in the first six 
centuries: martyrdom, monasticism, marriage 
and virginity, the practice of the virtues. 
Requirements: seminar participation and three 
ten-page studies. 
Burns TTh 10 : 30-11 : 45 Winter 



64 



Historical Studies 



JSTC H-416 

Patristic Interpretation of Christianity 

Using a discussion-group format involving the 
active participation of all members, this course 
will investigate the theology and piety of the 
early Church by reading carefully selected texts 
by such authors as Justin, Origen, Athanasius, 
Gregory of Nyssa, Leo the Great, Cyprian and 
Augustine, and by examining their basic assump- 
tions and fundamental views concerning God, 
Christ, Redemption and the Christian Life. 
Requirements: readings and short weekly re- 
ports. Maximum enrollment 14. 
Burns/ Haight Th 2-5 Fall 

CTS CH-491 

Contrasting Philosophies of History 

A study of Augustine's Christian prototype, The 
City of God, in contrast and comparison with 
more recent philosophies of history to be selec- 
ted by the seminar participants. Evaluation for 
relevance and formulation of a viable stance 
today will be attempted. 
Manschreck M 1-4:30 Fall 

C. MEDIEVAL 
BTS H-342 

The Christian Civilization: From Constantine 
to Cromwell 

A study of the political history of imperial 
Christianity and the synthesis of church and 
culture as expressed in medieval theology and 
art. Medieval Christianity and the Magisterial 
Reformation will be studied through lectures, 
group discussions, and audio-visual presen- 
tation. 
Wagner WF 8-9:20 Winter 

CTU H-307 
Christianization of Europe 

A study of the Church's encounter with the Bar- 
barian nations, of their conversion, and of the 
development of Christian life. An analysis of 
how the task affected Church life and thought 
and of how the Church affected the world. 
Major consideration will be given to: Medieval 
Missions, Charlemagne, the Papal States, the 
Schism between East and West, and the 
development and experience of a Christian 
European Culture (theology, philosophy, social 
and political structures). 
Nemer MWF 9-9:50 Winter 

DIT H-309 

History of the Church from 700 to 1500 A.D. 

Intellectual development and structuring of 
Christian thought. The development of the 



papacy and the structures of the Church within 
the context of Christendom. Prerequisite: DIT 
H-307 or equivalent. 
Hartenbach MWF 10:10-11 Winter 

JSTC H-423 
Medieval Christianity 

Lecture course with reading of primary 
materials. A survey of the development of 
medieval theology with reference to the cultural 
development of Christendom. Topics will in- 
clude scriptural interpretation, sacramental 
theology, the work of Christ, nature and grace, 
the reform of monasticism, the rise of the men- 
dicant orders, the encounter with Aristotle and 
the rise of the universities. Requirements: re- 
ports on reading of primary materials and 
examination. 
Montague /Burns MW 1:30-3 Winter 

JSTC H-424 

Medieval and Reformed Interpretations of 

Christianity 

Using a discussion-group format involving the 
active participation of all members, this course 
will investigate such fundamental Christian 
themes as the relation of philosophy and 
theology, God and his providence and grace, 
Christ and his redemptive work, in selected 
theological tests from Anselm, Bonaventure, 
Aquinas, Scotus, Erasmus, Luther, Radical 
Reformers, Trent, and Calvin. 
Wicks/Haight MW 1:30-3 Winter 

D. REFORMATION 
CTS CH-342 

Christianity in the World : History of the 
Christian People II 

A continuation of CTS CH-341. Special at- 
tention will be given to late medieval and 
renaissance developments, the conciliar 
movement, the Reformation, the Counter- 
Reformation, the Anabaptists, and emerging 
new forms of Christian expression. 
Manschreck MF 10:30-12 Spring 

CTU H-310 

Christianity in the Renaissance and Reformation 

Factors influencing the breakdown of the 

medieval synthesis. Renaissance thought and 

style chiefly in relationship to the Church. 

Writings of the Reformers, and the position of 

Trent. 

Nemer MWF 11-11: 50 Spring 

LSTC H-330A 

Reformation and Modern Church History 

An introduction to Reformation and Modern 




65 



Historical Studies 

Church History outside America, designed to 
show in broad perspective the movements 
which have shaped world Christianity in our 
time. Lectures and group discussions of selected 
source readings. 
Fischer MWF 12-12 : 50 Win ter 

LSTC H-330B 

Studies in Reformation and Modern Church 

History 

A survey course for students with some 
background in church history, using the 
thematic approach (e.g. nature of the church, 
justification) to study interaction between 
church and culture and the influence and effect of 
cultural developments on Christian self- 
understanding. 
Kukkonen MWF 12-12: 50 Winter 

NBTS H-342 

Church History II: The Reformation and 

Modern Christianity 

Major issues and developments in Christian life 
and thought from the time of the Reformation 
to the present are examined in order (1) to better 
understand contemporary expressions of 
Christianity, (2) to acquire some knowledge of 
historical methodology , and (3) to develop 
ability in interpreting religious movements and 
evaluating the significance of past movements 
for today. Regular and intensive reading, both 
in primary and secondary sources, is em- 
phasized as a basis for meaningful classroom 
discussion. 
TBAn TTh 8-9:20 Winter 

MTS H-310 

Hispanic Church Reformers 

This course will study the contribution to the 

Reformation by Spanish Reformers from the 

16th Century to present including the Spanish 

mystics. 

Justo Gonzalez TBAr Fall 

M/L H-472 

Grace and Will (Medieval and Reformation) 

Class will begin with a careful reading of 
Erasmus's Inquisitio de fide, De libero arbitrio, 
and Hyperaspistes and Luther's De servo ar- 
bitrio. We shall then proceed to trace issues 
raised in the course of that debate through 
medieval literature. Special attention will be 
devoted to select works of Augustine and An- 
selm of Canterbury, as well as to Thomas 
Aquinas and William of Ockham. The course 
will conclude with a study of several of Luther's 
and Erasmus's works which preceded the debate 



and which disclose their incipient positions on 
sin, free choice, and divine grace. Our objective 
is to explore the ways in which medieval 
traditions were appropriated before Erasmus 
and Luther found themselves at cross-purposes 
and during the course of their debate. 
Kaufman TBAr Spring 

JSTC H-427 
Reformation Christianity 

A study of church and theology on the eve of 
the Reformation, of the main themes of Luther's 
teaching, and on the diverse Catholic responses 
to the Reformation challenge. Lectures, with 
assigned readings and a paper. 
Wicks MW 1:30-3 Fall 

LSTC H-435 
Theology of Luther 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the 
student to Luther's theology in its broad com- 
prehensiveness and its dynamic thrust. Selected 
works in various categories are discussed in 
class. The student reads other works of his or 
her own choosing, and prepares a term paper. 
Fischer MW 1 : 30-2 : 45 Spring 

MTS H-401 

Seminar on the Theology of John Calvin 

A systematic study of Calvin's theology as seen 
primarily in the Institutes of the Christian 
Religion. 

Rigdon Fall 

Tu 7-10 pm in Evanston or W 2-5 at MTS 

M/L H-436 

Arminius and the Reformed Tradition 

A critical examination of the writings of James 
Arminius and their influence on Reformed and 
liberal theology. 
Godbey F 2-4:50 Winter 

M/L H-438 

Seminar : Michael Servetus 

A critical reading of selected works of Michael 
Servetus and of related works of leaders in the 
Radical Reformation. 
Godbey F 2-4:50 Spring 

BTS H-440 

The Radical Reformation 

A seminar on the "Left Wing" of the Refor- 
mation, with readings in representative 
literature from Anabaptism, Spiritualism, and 
Evangelical Rationalism. Participants are 
assumed to have general background un- 
derstanding of the Reformation Era. 
Durnbaugh Th 7-9 : 30 pm Win ter 



66 



Historical Studies 



M/L H-435 

Menno Simons and Dutch Anabaptism 

A critical reading of the works of Menno 
Simons in the context of sixteenth-century 
Anabaptism. Attention will be given to the 
relationship of Dutch Anabaptist thought to 
subsequent developments in historical theology. 
Godbey F 2-4: 50 Fall 

JSTC H-417 

The Spiritual Theology of Ignatius of Loyola 

An examination (through lectures, readings, and 
discussions) of the theological significance of the 
spiritual writings of Ignatius of Loyola. His 
autobiography, Spiritual Exercises, Con- 
stitutions of the Society of Jesus, and selected 
letters, along with various secondary sources, 
will be studied. Final paper and written or oral 
examination. 
Montague Th 3:30-5:30 Fall 

JSTC H-418 

History of Christian Spirituality : 16th 

Century Spanish Mystics 

A study of the spiritual theologies of Teresa of 
Avila and John of the Cross, through lectures, 
readings, and discussions of selected writings, 
e.g., the Autobiography, Way of Perfection, 
and Interior Castle of Teresa of Avila; selec- 
tions from The Ascent of Mount Carmel and The 
Dark Night of John of the Cross. Final paper 
and written or oral examination. 
Montague Th 3 : 30-5 : 30 Spring 

CTS CH-560 

Major Men of the Reformation 

A seminar dealing with one man in the Refor- 
mation period, his life and thought and con- 
tinuing significance. In 1977, Calvin. 
Manschreck WF 10:30-12 Fall 

JSTC H-519 
Reformation Seminar 

Investigation of the views of Christ and the 
world underlying central positions of selected 
Reformation era theologians: Luther, Erasmus, 
Calvin, Robert Bellarmine. Introductory lec- 
tures and readings, followed by presentation of 
papers by all participants. 
Wicks Th 2-5 Winter 

LSTC H-610 

Seminar : Luther on Repentance and Grace 

Luther's own crisis centered on the church's 
penitential system. His evangelical faith was a 
new understanding of the Gospel of God's grace 
in Christ. This graduate seminar will explore 
this whole theological and experiential complex, 



the heart of Luther's faith. Special attention is 
given to the tools and techniques of critical 
historical study. (For post-M.Div. students. Ad- 
mission of others by approval of instructor.) 
Fischer MW 1:30-2: 45 Fall 

E. MODERN 

DIT H-310 

History of the Church from 1500 to the Present 

The fragmentation of Christendom and new 
theological thought. The Church on the defen- 
sive in the Age of the Enlightenment and the 
Revolutionary Age. The attempts of the Church 
to cope with the Modern Age. 
Hartenbach MWF8:10-9 Winter 

BTS H-340 

The Believers' Church 

A study of the meaning, rise, and development 
of the Free Church tradition within Christianity 
from the Reformation to the present day, and its 
implication for contemporary churches. 
Durnbaugh MWF2:10-3 Fall 

BTS H-343 

History of the Church of the Brethren 

Analysis of the development of the Church of 
the Brethren from its sectarian beginnings in 
eighteenth century Europe to its denominational 
position in twentieth century America with par- 
ticular attention to its relationships with other 
Christian movements and its cultural en- 
vironment. 
Durnbaugh WF 9-9:30 Spring 

LSTC H-360 

The Lutheran Heritage 

Content and scope of the Lutheran confessional 
writings and the manner in which they are nor- 
mative for Lutheran ministry and church life 
today. Recent confessional statements and 
results of inter-confessional dialogues are taken 
into account. 

Scherer MW 3-4:15 Winter 

Pero MW 8: 30-9: 50 Spring 

MTS H-312 

Critical History of the Spanish Bible 

This course will examine the historical develop- 
ment as well as the critical studies in the trans- 
lation of the Spanish Bible from the original 
languages. 
Jorge Gonzalez March 13-17, TBAn Winter 

BTS H-445 

The Intentional Community 

A study of religiously-based communitarian 
movements in Christian history, focusing on 




67 



Historical Studies 



such groups as the Hutterites, the Renewed 

Moravian Church, the Ephrata Community, the 

Shakers, Amana, the Hutterian Society of the 

Brothers, Koinonia Farm, and the Ecumenical 

Institute. 

Durnbaugh M 7-9:30 pm Winter 

CTS CH-490 

Eighteenth Century England 

A study of the events and forces present in 18th 
century English life and their impact on religion. 
Manschreck W 1-4 Winter 

CTS CH-492 

Nineteenth Century Developments in Religion 

A study of significant events and movements of 
thought in 19th century religious life. 
Manschreck W 1-4 Spring 

CTU H-422 

19th Century Imperialism and World Mission 

A study of the Church as it encounters the new 
world born of the French Revolution, of how it 
affects and is affected by social and political 
considerations, of imperialism (Church and 
State), and of the missionary expansion in the 
late 19th and early 20th centuries. Major con- 
siderations will be given to: the Church's en- 
counter with French and Italian political 
liberalism, with German philosophical and 
theological liberalism, with English scientific 
and political liberalism; the Church's response 
in the Syllabus of Errors and Vatican I; Europe 
in Asia and Africa; Mission as Structure; the 
hesitant growth of local Churches; a western 
Christianity in a non-western world. 
Nemer MWF9-9:50 Spring 

JSTC H-454 

John Henry Newman : Prophetic Figure of 

Contemporary Catholicism 

This course will attempt to give the student a 
better grasp of the present-day issues of Roman 
Catholicism by studying the writings of Car- 
dinal Newman in historical perspective. Topics 
will include the development of doctrine, 
pluralism in theology, authority and the con- 
sensus fidelium, Catholicism and acculturation, 
the role of the laity, the act of faith in relation 
to reason. Students will follow their own in- 
terests in readings from an approved syllabus. 
Bi-weekly reading reports. Two weeks are 
allowed for the final synthetic exam from the 
readings. 
Ross W 3 : 30-5 : 30 Win ter 



JSTC H-419 

Catholicism and Crisis : The Church in the 60's 
This course will try to place the recent turmoil of 
Roman Catholicism in its historical and cultural 
setting. Lectures will develop such issues as 
social consciousness, ecumenism, war, 
authority, priesthood, and laity. Students may 
follow their own interest in readings from an 
approved syllabus. Bi-weekly reading reports. 
Two weeks will be allowed for a final synthetic 
exam from the readings. 
Ross W 3:30-5:30 Fall 

MTS H-430 

Seminar on Eastern Orthodox Christianity 

A survey of the history of Eastern Orthodoxy 
from the Byzantine period with special attention 
to selected theological motifs and problems. 
Rigdon W 2-5 Winter 

MTS H-433 

Travelling Seminar on Eastern Orthodox 

Christianity in Eastern Europe 

Prerequisite : MTS H-430 

Rigdon TBAn Spring 

CCTS T-559 

Developments in Modern Theology, 

Protestant and Catholic 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Braaten/Haight MW 1:30-3 Spring 

DIT H-530 

Development of the Idea of Papal Infallibility 

An initial survey of the evidence pertaining to 
the authority of the Roman Church prior to the 
Middle Ages. An investigation of the develop- 
ment of Papal power, both secular and 
religious, during the course of the Middle Ages. 
A study of the processes of Vatican I and the in- 
fluences that were brought to bear upon it. 
Finally, a brief survey of the contemporary 
literature on the subject. 
Hartenbach TBAr Winter 

NBTSH-561 
Baptist Thought 

An examination and evaluation of charcteristic 
Baptist emphases in theology, polity, and prac- 
tice for the purpose of establishing our Baptist 
identity on the one hand and clarifying our 
commonality with the larger Believers' church 
tradition on the other. Student research, 
analysis, and evaluation of selected issues con- 
stitutes a vital part of the course. Admission by 
approval of instructor. 
Ohlmann WF 8-9:20 Spring 



68 






Historical Studies 



F. AMERICAN 

LSTC H-350A 

American Church History 

The pluralistic development of religious ideas, 
movements, and institutions in North America, 
from colonial times up to the present. The course 
surveys the total religious milieu rather than 
concentrating on Lutherartism. 
Scherer MWF9-9:50 Fall 

MTS H-350 

Christianity and Society in American History 

The history of American Christianity with focus 
on its interaction with the developing American 
culture. The question will be asked to what 
degree Christianity significantly challenged and 
molded that culture or was shared by it. Op- 
portunity will be given for special study in the 
origins and character of American civil religion. 
Schafer MW 2-4 Fall 

CTS CH-387 

Nature, Land and American Religion 

The lure of land has been a recurring motif in 
American life. This seminar will examine ideas 
of nature, land, wilderness, ecology and the 
good life as they have been interpreted by 
religious leaders. Effort will be made to relate 
this theme to contemporary urban and /or rural 
ministry. 
Zikmund W 3-6 Fall 

M/L E-321 

American Civil Religion 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Engel TBAr Fall 

M/L E-395 

American Civil Religion and 

Unitarian /Universalism 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Engel TBAr Winter 

CTS CH-393 

Women in the American Protestant Tradition 

A look at the role of women in the history of 
American Protestantism through autobiography 
and biography. All students will read six 
autobiographies or biographies in common and 
make a class presentation on one woman. 
Zikmund W 3-6 Spring 

LSTC H-350B 

American Lutheran Church History 

A core course focusing on Lutheranism in 



America, especially on its problem of unity and 
polarization. The historical development is 
viewed against the broad background of 
Christianity in America. Aim of the course is to 
gain perspective on our present problems in the 
context of their emergence and development. 
Fischer MWF 12-12: 50 Spring 

NBTS H-343 
Baptist History 

An inquiry into important issues and develop- 
ments in Baptist history (particularly in 
America) as an introduction to the origirt of 
Baptist groups and to the factors which have 
shaped their development. The methodological 
approach to this subject will consist of a com- 
bination of lectures and classroom discussions. 
(Non-Baptist students study their own religious 
heritage.) 
Ohlmann TTh 8-9:20 Spring 

CTS CH-386 

Evangelicalism in American Christianity 

The most significant development in recent 
American church life is the increased visibility 
and impact of evangelical movements and 
groups. This course will explore the roots of 
evangelical, holiness, charismatic and neo- 
pentecostal Christianity in order to understand 
more adequately the impact of this tradition on 
contemporary church faith and practice. 
Zikmund TTh 10:30-12 Winter 

CTU H-315 

Roman Catholicism in the U.S. from the 

American Revolution to World War I 

This course, through lectures and readings, will 
study the major influences on the development 
of the Roman Catholic Church in the 19th and 
early 20th centuries, e.g., her minority status, 
anti-catholic bias in the mid-19th century, 
trusteeism in the church, the influx of im- 
migrants, the spread of the frontier, the Civil 
War, the School Controversy, the Americanist 
Heresy, etc. 
Nemer MWF 11-11:50 Winter 

JSTC H-421 

American Catholic Experience : 1920 to 1970 
Lectures and readings on the main problems and 
movements of the American Catholic Com- 
munity from World War I to the 1970's. These 
will include acculturation and acceptance in 
American society, social questions, education, 
Church-State implications, and liberal goals 
contrasted before and after Vatican II. There 
will be bi-weekly reading reports on selections 



a 



69 



Historical Studies 



made from an approved syllabus. Two weeks 
will be allowed for a final synthetic exam from 
the readings. 
Ross W 3:30-5:30 Spring 

DIT H-413 

History of the American Catholic Church 

A study of the background of present-day 
American Catholicism; the national groups that 
make it up, the problems which it has had to 
face and its response to those problems. 
Hartenbach MWF 10: 10-11 Spring 

MTS H-406 

The American Presbyterian and Reformed 

Churches 

A historical survey of the major Presbyterian 
and Reformed bodies in America, with special 
attention to the theological and institutional 
history of the United Presbyterian Church. 
Schafer W 7-10 pm Fall 

MTS H-475 

Seminar on Historiography 

A research seminar on the history of Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary utilizing our 
own rich archives as a resource and laboratory 
for the writing of original history. This seminar 
will explore a variety of problems in the writing 
and interpretation of history. It is hoped that 
students will produce significant, publishable 
contributions for McCormick's sesquicentennial 
celebration in 1979. Enrollment by approval of 
instructor. 
Rigdon W 7-10 pm Fall 

BTS H-444 

Modern Religious Movements 

Description and analysis of the most active and 
aggressive cult groups in the United States, in- 
cluding Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, 
Unification Church, and Scientology. 
Durnbaugh Th 7-9 :30 pm Fall 



student interest. 
Hartenbach 



TBAr 



Winter 



MTS H-499, 599 
Independent Study 

Schafer/Rigdon 



By Arrangement 



DIT H-511 (2 or 3 QH) 

American Catholic Response to Social Problems 

The developing stand of the Catholic Church in 
the United States concerning social justice, with 
emphasis on the relationship between captial 
and labor. The roots of the contemporary 
American Catholic Church's positions or non- 
positions on social issues. Offered in response to 



LSTC H-550 

The Decision-Making Process in American 

Luther anism 

Beginning from the constitutions and policy 
statements of the various American Lutheran 
bodies, in the content of their historical 
development, this seminar will explore the ways 
in which these churches actually operate. Term 
paper. (Prerequisite: LSTC H-350A or H-350B 
or equivalent.) 
Fischer MWF 11-11: 50 Winter 

MTS H-600 

The Evangelicals : Whence and Whither 

The Churches today are less socially and 
politically active than a decade ago; there is 
more emphasis on personal piety, corporate 
worship, and local congregational concerns; the 
theological climate is more conservative. How 
do these trends affect our relationship to the 
"Evangelical" wing of Protestantism? Most of us 
need more knowledge and better understanding 
of those who are theologically and socially to 
the right of us for addressing that question. The 
course will examine the history of Fun- 
damentalism and Evangelicalism in order to 
identify major types and tendencies in modern 
"Third Force" Christianity. The serious issues 
that divide "conservative" and "liberal" today, 
recent efforts at bridging the gap, prospects for 
the future role of evangelicalism in the churches 
and in national life — these and similar matters 
will be investigated. 
Schafer Feb. 13-17, TBAn Winter 

MTS H-605 

Recent Developments in Church Polity 

Throughout the Church the rules and 
procedures for doing the church's work are 
changing. Church law has developed in different 
ways in each protestant tradition. This develop- 
ment has been influenced by environmental fac- 
tors and purposes of the group in a particular 
historical moment. The purpose of the course is 
to explore this relationship in the interest of 
having a positive understanding of church law 
and in developing better polity today. This 
course is offered for church executives, Stated 
Clerks and other officials interested in church 
law, and pastors who are responsible for in- 
terpreting, and/or rewriting church law today. 
Schafer /Worley April 17-21, TBAn Spring 



70 



III. THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

A. METHODS AND DOCTRINES 

CTS TEC-304 
Constructive Theology I 

The nature of theological thinking and 

theological method. 

LeFevre MW 1:30-3 Winter 

CTS TEC-305 
Constructive Theology II 

The systematic formulation of the student's own 

theological position is the major task. 

Jennings MF 10:30-12 Fall 

CTU T-320 
Phenomenology of Religion 

A study of the basic forms and processes of 

religion and the symbolization process as they 

relate to society and self. The impact of 

secularization on religious forms is assessed, as 

well as the role of the religious leader in cultural 

frameworks. 

Schreiter MWF 10-10: 50 Fall 

CTU T-325 
Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and 
methods of theology worked out from a study 
of several case histories. Special emphasis on the 
historical revelation in Christianity and the 
developing awareness of the faith-community in 
relation to shifting horizons. 
Hayes MWF 11-11 : 50 Fall 

Linnan MWF 10-10:50 Winter 

CTU T-330 

The Problem of God and Contemporary Society 

An analysis of why God has become 
problematic for contemporary man is followed 
by a critical review of representative Christian 
attempts to respond to this problem. The course 
seeks to help the student evaluate his own 
religious experience and respond intelligently to 
modern man's problem of God. 
Linnan MWF 12-12: 50 Winter 

CTU T-331 

Culture and the Experience of God 

An investigation of the Western Christian 
response to God, and of the challenges and 
possibilities which various cultural experiences 
bring to forming a Christian understanding of 
God. The meaning of the monotheism and 
polytheism, as well as problems of grace and the 
absence of God will be discussed. 
Pero MW 12-1:15 Spring 



Theological Studies 

CTU T- 350 

Basic Principles of Catholic Worship 

An introduction to the Catholic heritage of 
liturgical and sacramental worship. Survey of 
classical patterns of liturgical prayer and the 
Catholic tradition of reflection on sacraments. 
Introduction to contemporary concerns about 
liturgical prayer and current issues in sacramen- 
tal theology. Attention will be given to 
questions of liturgical planning and praxis. 
Keifer MW2-3:15 Fall 

Keifer MWF 10-10:50 Spring 

CTU 1-315 

Interpretation and Ministry 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 
Integrative Studies offerings. 
Osiek/Schreiter MW 12-1: 15 Spring 

Osiek/Schreiter MW2-3:15 Spring 

DIT T-300 

Revelation and the Response in Faith 

This course centers on the nature and the 
various explanations of revelation and the 
response in faith; on the inter-relationship 
existing between scripture, tradition and the 
magisterium ; the nature and irreformability of 
dogma. The course is taught in such a way as to 
introduce the student to strict theological 
methodology and to acquaint him with the 
problematic of theological understanding and 
expression. 
Falanga MWF 10: 10-11 Fall 

DIT T-301 

Horizons of Christian Spirituality 

This course embraces the following: basic pat- 
terns of psychological growth in contemporary 
context according to one model of development, 
e.g. Erickson. The nature of commitment and its 
varying forms specified by its relationship to the 
other, e.g., friendship, marriage, religious life. 
Some patterns of spirituality, taken from 
history and contemporary life, that are par- 
ticularly applicable to religious life, e.g., 
Ignatian spirituality, active spirituality (Mother 
Theresa) and Catholic mysticism. Finally, part of 
the course will seek to provide the students with 
some conceptual tools that will enable them to 
mediate the three realms of meaning articulated 
in the daily living of the Christian life, 
theoretical theology and the interior life. 
Enrollment is limited to De Andreis students. 
Staff WF1-2:15 Fall 




71 



Theological Studies 



DIT T-302 

Theological Anthropology 

The course seeks to provide the fundamental 
horizon and principles grounding modern 
theology. A survey of anthropologies at the 
basis of various theologies will be presented. 
The course will focus on man as self- 
transcending being through an analysis of the 
symbolic and communitarian nature of his 
being. 
Minogue WF 1-2 : 15 Winter 

DIT T-303 
Ecclesiology 

This course seeks to understand and explore the 
consequences of Vatican II's teaching in the 
dogmatic constitution "Lumen Gentium" in con- 
junction with the pastoral constitution "On the 
Church in the Modern World" and the Decree 
on Ecumenism, the Decree on the Bishops' 
Pastoral Office in the Church, the Decree on the 
Appropriate Renewal of the Religious Life, the 
Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity, the 
Decree on the Ministry and Life of Priests, the 
Decree on the Church's Missionary Activity and 
the Declaration of the Relationship of the Church 
to non-Christian Religions. Special attention 
is given to the metaphors "People of God" and 
"Mystical Body of Christ." Various con- 
temporary ecclesiological models are examined 
and compared. Special emphasis is placed on 
the universal Christian priesthood, the basic 
equality and functional inequality of Church 
members as well as upon the participation of 
each member of the church in its mission. 
Falanga MWF8:10-9 Winter 

DIT T-361 

Sacraments of Initiation : 

Baptism, Confirmation 

General introduction to the sacraments as 
saving Christological and Ecclesiological arts. 
The nature, number, purpose and causality of 
the sacraments is considered with emphasis on 
modern theological discussion and ecumenical 
import. Baptism and confirmation are con- 
sidered precisely as acts of the Church. The 
rights and duties they confer on each person is 
studied, as is their relation to each other and to 
the Eucharist. 
Falanga MWF 10:10-11 Spring 

DIT T-362 
The Eucharist 

The Lord's supper and the celebration of the 
Eucharist in biblical, historical and theological 



context. Catholic dogmatic teaching, 
ecumenical discussion, and current questions are 
critically examined, especially as they relate to 
the celebration of the Eucharist as sacramental 
sacrifice and communion. Substantive canonical 
and moral matters pertaining to the Eucharist 
are studied. 
Falanga Th 9:10-11 Fall 

JSTC T-351 
Fundamental Theology I 

Lectures and discussions toward a personal syn- 
thesis of Fundamental Theology. 
Weekl: Introduction; setting the ques- 

tions, method 
Weeks 2-5 : Faith and Revelation 

Haight/Schineller 
Weeks 6-11 : The World in Sin and Grace 

Sears 
Other than JSTC M.Div. students admitted by 
approval of instructors. 
Doyle, Fehr, Haight M 10-10:50 Fall 
Schineller, Sears W 9 : 30-10 : 50 

F 9:30-10:50 

JSTCT-352 
Fundamental Theology II 

A continuation of lectures and discussions 

toward the personal synthesis of Fundamental 

Theology. 

Weeks 1-5 : The Person and Work of Christ 

Schineller 
Weeks 6-10 : Understanding the Church 

Haight 
Week 11 : The Question of Method 

Doyle, Fehr, Haight, Schineller, Sears 
Other than JSTC M.Div. students admitted by 
approval of instructors. 

Doyle, Fehr, Haight M 10-10:50 Winter 
Schineller, Sears W 9 : 30-10 : 50 

F 9:30-10:50 

JSTC T-353 
Fundamental Theology III 

A continuation of lectures and discussions 
toward the personal synthesis of Fundamental 
Theology. 

Weeks 1-4: The Sacramental Life of the 
Church 

Fehr 
Weeks 5-7: God: One and Triune 

Sears 
Weeks 8-9 : Work on Synthesis 
Week 10 : Oral Examinations 



72 



Other than JSTC M.Div. students admitted by 
permission of instructors. 
Doyle, Fehr, Haight M 10-10:50 Spring 
Schineller, Sears W 9 : 30-10 : 50 

F 9:30-10:50 

LSTC T-310 
Introduction to Theology 

An introduction to the nature of theology as an 
academic discipline and as the exposition of a 
faith perspective. Readings in major recent 
theologians, with special attention to the 
question of methodology. For beginning 
theological students. 

Sherman MW3-4:15 Fall 

Pero TTh 10:45-12 Fall 

LSTC T-311, 312 
Christian Theology, I, II 

Survey and interpretation of basic Christian 
doctrine. The full range of Christian doctrine, 
from creation to eschatology, is dealt with in 
these two courses. Although each course forms 
an independent unit, the two cources are in- 
terrelated to constitute a total sequence. Students 
interested in taking only one of the courses 
should consult with the instructor. 
Braaten MWF 12-12:50 Winter 

Braaten MWF 11-11 : 50 Spring 

MTS T-301 

Introduction to Theology I: Fundamental 

Theology 

An introduction to the study of theology as the 
reasoned endeavor to understand the reality of 
human life in the world from the perspective of 
Christian faith in God. Fundamental Theology 
deals with issues of revelation, faith in God, 
religious experience , and symbolism. Recom- 
mended for all first year students. 
Parker MW 11-1 Fall 

MTS T-302 

Introduction to Theology II : Basic Christian 

Doctrines 

This course is designed to introduce the basic 
doctrines of the Christian faith, as these are un- 
derstood and reflected upon by representative 
theologians. Attention will be given to coherent 
and constructive appropriation of the Christian 
tradition. Recommended for all first year 
students. 
Burkhart TuF2-4 Winter 

NBTS T-351 
Philosophy of Religion 

This course is an introduction to the main 
religious philosophies in western culture. The 



Theological Studies 

origin of Christian doctrines and the historical 
background and development of modern 
systems are studied and evaluated. 
Young MWF 2: 10-3 Spring 

NBTS T-353 

Systematic Theology I : Introduction 

to Theology 

This course provides an introduction to the 
study of the presuppositions of theology. The 
relation of faith and reason is taken up in detail. 
The term concludes with a study of revelation 
and inspiration. The works of various 
theologians are studied. 

Young MWF 11:30-12:20 Fall 

NBTS T-354 

Systematic Theology II : Eschatology 
and Christology 

Questions as to the nature and value of 
systematic theology are raised in the context of 
exploring several important contemporary ap- 
proaches to the subject which are studied 
simultaneously throughout the course. At- 
tention is focused on Jesus' announcement that 
God's Kingdom was at hand and on the im- 
plications of this eschatological proclamation 
for Christian life and theology. Attention next 
turns to the proclaimer, focusing on his "work" 
to gain an understanding of his "person" and the 
nature of the salvation he brought. 
Finger WF8-9:20 Winter 

NBTS T-355 

Systematic Theology III : Salvation, the Church 

and God 

Following discussion of the atoning work of 
Christ in T-354, the nature of justification and 
faith are examined. Sanctification is discussed 
within the context of the life and mission of the 
Church. Finally, the nature of God is elucidated 
by drawing together what has previously been 
studied regarding his revelation and historical 
activity. As in T-354, these issues are 
discussed by exploring several contemporary 
approaches to the subject simultaneously. 
Finger WF 8-9:20 Spring 

BTS T-468 

The Drama of Christian Dogma 
Viewing the ecumenical creeds and more com- 
mon Christian dogma as our mutual Christian 
heritage, we shall explore those assertions made 
about the limiting/ sustaining nature of reality, 
and examine in what forms the human drama 
contains, as it is meaningfully illumined by, 
Christian dogmatic-symbolic truth claims. 
Meyer Weekend Intensive TBAn Spring 




73 



Theological Studies 



CTU 1-439 (2 full courses) 
Christology 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 

Integrative Studies offerings. 

Schreiter/Senior TTh 10:30-11:45 Fall/Winter 

CTU T-441 

Christology and Cultures 

A critical review of the development of un- 
derstandings of Jesus and salvation in the 
Christian tradition, and their implications in a 
cross-cultural context. Special attention is given 
to models of incarnation and salvation, univer- 
sal claims about Jesus within a religious 
pluralism, and the question of the ethnic Christ. 
Schreiter MWF 12-12: 50 Fall 

DIT T-422 
Christology 

Interpretation of the Incarnation and Redemp- 
tion. The course surveys New Testament 
Christology, historical development and 
dogmatic pronouncements, traditional and con- 
temporary theology. Drawing on personal study 
and group discussion, each student is asked to 
compose a christological statement for our day. 
Walsh MWF 10:10-11 Fall 

JSTC T-452 

Christology: Biblical, Historical, Contemporary 

A team-taught course, consisting of lectures and 
assigned readings in sequence on (1) the biblical 
foundations of Christology, (2) historical 
developments from the patristic period to the 
reformation, and (3) contemporary approaches 
in systematic theology. In addition to par- 
ticipation in the discussions, the student will 
write brief papers on each of the three major 
sections of the course. 

La Verdiere/Burns/Schineller Spring 

TTh 10:30-11:45 

LSTC T-455 

Types of Christology, Ancient and Modern 

The aim of this seminar will be to establish cer- 
tain types of christological thought that endure 
in theology despite changes in worldview and 
methodology between ancient and modern 
times. Among those studied as representative 
types will be Irenaeus, Athanasius, Augustine, 
Luther, Calvin, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Ritschl, 
Barth and Tillich. 
Braaten MW 1 : 30-2 : 45 Winter 

MTS T-404 

The Dcotrine of the Spirit 

A consideration of the doctrine of the Holy 
Spirit in the Christian theological tradition. At- 



tention will be given to some current 
manifestations of the Spirit in the life and work 
of the churches. 
Parker TuF2-4 Winter 

CTS TEC -411 
Theological Anthropology 

Theological perspectives on the human con- 
dition. What is the peculiar dilemma and 
dignity of being human? How is theology 
related to the disciplines of pastoral care and 
ethics? This course will focus upon biblical and 
theological understandings of human existence 
(Creation and Fall) and their coordination to 
psychological and sociopolitical understandings 
in the contemporary world. Readings will in- 
clude Bonhoeffer, Becker, Niebuhr, and others. 
Jennings TTh 10:30-12 Winter 

CTS TEC -409 
Christian Existence 

What is the basis and form of Christian existence 
in today's world? The course will attempt to 
work through an understanding of Justification 
and Sanctification which can inform the 
development of appropriate Christian life-styles 
in our day. Readings will include Jacques Ellul, 
Daniel Day Williams, Hans Kung, and others. 
Jennings TTh 10:30-12 Spring 

DIT T-423 
Man in Christ 

The course will consider the conditions for the 
possibility and consequences of God's self- 
communication to man in Christ. A historical 
perspective will be provided by considering the 
problems and conceptual framework leading to 
the scholastic synthesis on nature and grace. 
The main emphasis of the course will be the ex- 
plicitation of the multiple dimensions of man's 
life in Christ through a consideration of 
obediential potency, conversion, and the life of 
charity. The virgin Mary is studied as the most 
perfect of the redeemed. 
Minogue MWF 10:10-11 Winter 

LSTC T-450 

Theology and the Church's Ministry 

An integrative course dealing with the role of 
theology in pastoral formation and functioning. 
(For seniors at LSTC; others by approval of in- 
structor.) 
Braaten MW3-4:15 Fall 

JSTC T-465 

Faith and Sacraments 

The chief interest of this course is the ecclesial, 
sacramental structure of the Christian life of 



74 



Theological Studies 



faith. The intent is to provide a theological basis 
(Christological and Ecclesiological) for a 
"sacramental spirituality." The principle of 
sacramentality will be explicated from Scripture 
and the gradual development of the notion of 
"sacrament" in the Church's tradition. The im- 
plications of this theology for a contemporary 
spirituality will be explored in the context of 
post- Vatican II ecclesiologies. Format: lectures 
and discussions on assigned weekly readings. 
Term paper. 
Fehr TTh 9-10:15 Spring 

CTU T-455 
Sacraments of Initiation 

General introduction to sacramental theology. 
Historical development of the rites and theology 
of Christian initiation. Current questions con- 
cerning the theology, catechesi^, and celebration 
of the sacraments of initiation. 
Keifer TTh 12-1:15 Fall 

MTS T-402 

Baptism and Eucharist 

A study of the Christian doctrines of baptism 
and eucharist with emphasis on critical analysis 
of various issues now in controversy. Attention 
will be given to the liturgical implications of 
various theological outlooks. 
Burkhart TTh 11-1 Spring 

CTU T-450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

A study of the scriptural origins and historical 
development of the eucharistic liturgy, with par- 
ticular emphasis on the eucharistic prayer. 
Theological reflection on the meaning of 
eucharist in light of the above and of con- 
temporary discussion. Consideration of current 
questions, e.g., ecumenical questions of inter- 
communion and eucharistic ministry. 
Ostdiek MWF 11-11: 50 Fall 

CTU 1-450 (1 or 2 full courses) 
Eucharist /Preaching /Celebration 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 

Integrative Studies offerings. 

Baumer /Keifer MWF 10-11:50 Winter 

CTU T-460 

Sacraments of Penance, Anointing, Orders 

The origins and historical development of 
penance, anointing, ordination. Questions of 
contemporary theological significance and 
celebration of these sacraments. 
Ostdiek MWF 9-9: 50 Fall 



DIT T-463 (2 QH) 

Penance and the Anointing of the Sick 

These two sacraments are studied in a historical 
context. The Catholic dogmatic teaching on each 
is critically examined in the light of more recent 
ecclesiological documents and current 
discussion. In the light of post-conciliar ec- 
clesiology, the moral and pastoral implications 
of dogmatic teaching is explored. 
Falanga Th 9 : 10-11 Spring 

■ DITT-464(2QH) 
The Sacraments of Matrimony and Orders 

This course presents Catholic dogmatic teaching 
on marriage and orders with special attention 
being given to the documents of Vatican II and 
critically examines current theological 
discussion and ecumenical import. An attempt 
is made to situate this study in the context of 
post-conciliar ecclesiology, liturgy and 
spirituality. Substantive moral and pastoral im- 
plications of the dogmatic teaching are ex- 
plored. 
Minogue WF 8:10-9 Fall 

CTU T-435 

Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning the 
origins of man, the world and evil; a correlative 
investigation of finality and eschatological sym- 
bolism. 
Hayes MWF 10-10:50 Fall 

CTU T-436 

Eschatology and Eschatologies 
A comparison of central themes in Christian 
eschatology — apocalyptic crisis literature, 
death, final completion of the individual and the 
world — with eschatological views in selected 
non-Christian religious literature. The com- 
parison will be directed toward a better un- 
derstanding of eschatological symbols and sym- 
bolic systems in both Christian and other 
cultural situations. 
Schreiter MWF 10-10:50 Spring 

NBTS T-551 
Theism 

The main theistic systems in both ancient and 
modern thought are studied. Considerable at- 
tention is given to recent theistic discussion. 
Historic Christian theism as a philosophy of life 
is presented and evaluated. A Seminar. 
Prerequisite: NBTS Systematic Theology I, II, 
III or equivalent. 
Young TTh 1 : 10-3 : 40 Win ter 




75 



Theological Studies 

BTS T-550 

The Language of Christology 

Following an examination of the doctrine of 
revelation and questions of theological 
epistemology, the course deals with matters per- 
taining to the person and work of Christ. A 
constructive analysis and statement of the 
language of Christology is presented. The 
student is afforded the opportunity to formulate 
a doctrinal position and to test the statement 
against the Bible and church tradition, in dialog 
with other class participants. 
Groff M 3:30-6 Fall 

DIT T-522 (2 or 3 QH) 
Problems in Christology 

The seminar will consider the consciousness of 

Christ, and the problematic unity in Christ. The 

work of Lonergan, Rahner, Schoonenberg, and 

Pannenberg will provide the main basis for the 

course. 

Minogue TBAr Spring 

JSTC T-552 

Contemporary Christologies 

The characteristics and problems of con- 
temporary Christologies as compared with older 
approaches. Close study, discussion and critque 
of the writings of K. Rahner, Schoonenberg and 
Pannenberg in this field. Prerequisites: basic 
Christology and Soteriology. At least three 
must register for credit. Guided reading, lecture 
and discussion. Paper required. 
Doyle Th 3:30-5:30 Winter 

NBTS T-572 
Salvation 

An examination of the development of this 
notion, and other key related notions, in the 
Old and New Testaments. Then several im- 
portant theological interpretations from church 
history and contemporary theology will be ex- 
plored. Finally, students will develop their own 
view as to what salvation is and how it relates 
to present-day life and ministry. 
Finger MWF 11 : 30-12 : 20 Spring 

LSTC T-511 

The Doctrine of Grace 

A seminar devoted to study of important texts 
in the history of theology with the intention to 
trace the development of the doctrine of grace 
and to discern if possible if that development 
discloses specifiable responses to changes in 
Western culture. Prerequisite: LSTC T-310 or 
equivalent. 
Sittler MWF 11-11:50 Winter 



DIT T-503 

Problems in Ecclesiology 

A study in depth of some basic problems in con- 
temporary Ecclesiology: the relation of the 
Church to the churches and other religions; the 
mission of the Church to the world; secularity, 
revolution and social theology; the Church and 
the Kingdom of God; etc. Offered in response 
to student interest. 
Falanga TBAr TBAr 

CTS TEC-507 

Theology of Church and Ministry 

What and where is the church? What is the 
nature and function of an ordained ministry 
within the church? This seminar will focus upon 
the doctrine of the church and such crucial 
aspects of ministry within the church as 
preaching, sacraments, and pastoral care. 
Readings will include Kung, Rahner, Bonhoef- 
fer, Barth, and H. R. Niebuhr. 
Jennings W 1 : 30-4 : 30 Fall 

JSTC T-551 

Theology of Priestly Ministry 

The nature of ordained ministry in the Church 
has become a "disputed question" in Roman 
Catholic theology. The purpose of this course is 
to seek some guidelines and principles for 
fashioning a new theological interpretation of 
"priestly" ministry in a Roman Catholic context. 
Some attention will be given to the historical 
origins and development of this ministry, but 
the bulk of the time will be devoted to a variety 
of contemporary theologies of priestly ministry. 
By relating the central question to Christology 
and Ecclesiology, some basis will be sought for 
judging responsibly such contemporary issues as 
the "permanence" of priestly office, the ap- 
propriateness of celibacy, and the ordination of 
women. The format will be that of a seminar, 
with substantial weekly reading assignments as 
the basis for informed, critical discussion of the 
issues. Participants will be asked to write a brief 
paper (1-2 pages) each week, in reaction to the 
readings. The grade will be determined by the 
quality of these papers and by participation in 
the discussions. No term paper. 
Fehr TTh 9-10:15 Winter 

NBTS T-571 

The Kingdom of God 

A survey of the development of this concept in 
the Old Testament, of the meaning of Jesus' 
proclamation that the Kingdom was "at hand," 
and of other New Testament perspectives on the 






76 



Theological Studies 



subject. Several important theological in- 
terpretations of the Kingdom will then be 
examined. In conclusion, students will be asked 
to develop their own theology of the Kingdom 
and relate it to contemporary life and ministry. 



MF 3: 10-4: 40 



Fall 



Finger 

DIT T-533 (2 or 3 QH) 
Eschatology 

This course will explore the nature 
significance of eschatology in Scripture 
recent theology. The theology of time 
history; the relationship of divine and human 
providence; hope; 'the last things' will be 
examined. The method of instruction will be 



and 
and 
and 



seminar. 
Minogue 



TBAr 



Fall 



B. THINKERS AND SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT 

MTS T-419 

The Theology of Schleiermacher 

A seminar on the major theological writings of 
Friedrich Schleiermacher, with a focus on the 
issues of theological method and constructive 
reinterpretation of Christian doctrines in his 
work. Includes an assessment of his con- 
tributions to liberal theology. 
Parker Tu 7-10 pm Fall 

M/L T-437 

Seminar : Channing & Parker 
The course will be devoted to an examination of 
the writings of Channing and Parker and to 
recent interpretations of their theological in- 
fluence. 
Godbey TBAr Spring 

BTS T-452 

Theology of Karl Barth 

An inductive study of representative writings. 

Principal readings will be in the Church 

Dogmatics. 

Groff M 3:30-6 Winter 

JSTC T-489 

Heidegger and Theology 

A series of lectures with discussions of the early 

Heidegger's Being and Time and selected 

writings of the late Heidegger (Discourse on 

Thinking, What is Called Thinking, etc.). The 

group will consider the contribution and impact 

of Heidegger's thinking on questions in the 

theology of God, theological anthropology, and 

theological hermeneutics. Short reports and a 

final written or oral examination. 

Montague M 3 : 30-5 : 30 Winter 



JSTC T-492 

Introduction to the Theology of Paul Tillich 

A reading with lectures and discussions of selec- 
ted sermons and selections from Tillich's 
Systematic Theology. Special stress on Tillich's 
theological method as worked out in his treat- 
ment of the New Being in Jesus as the Christ vis- 
a-vis man's existential estrangement, and of the 
role of the Spirit in meeting the ambiguities of 
human life and culture. Short reports and a 
final oral or written examination. 
Montague M 3:30-5:30 Fall 

JSTC T-455 

Rahner's Theological Anthropology 

This course is a series of lectures which treat of 
Rahner's Theological Anthropology. The 
following articles, which are to be found in the 
various volumes of Theological Investigations, 
will be treated. (1) The Dignity and Freedom of 
Man, II, (2) The Secret of Life, VI, (3) The 
Unity of Spirit and Matter in the Christian Un- 
derstanding of Faith, VI, (4) Theology of 
Freedom, VI, (5) Guilt-Responsibility- 
Punishment within the View of Catholic 
Theology, VI, (6) Reflection on the Unity of the 
Love of Neighbour and the Love of God, VI, (7) 
Christian Humanism, IX, (8) The Experiment 
with Man, IX, (9) Self-Realisation and Taking 
up One's Cross, IX, (10) The Sin of Adam, XI, 
(11) Theological Observations on the Concept 
of Time, XI, (12) Theological Considerations on 
the Moment of Death, XI, (13) Institution and 
Freedom, XIII, (14) Experience of Self and Ex- 
perience of God, XIII, (15) Does Traditional 
Theology Represent Guilt as Innocuos As a Fac- 
tor in Human Life? XIII, (16) Theological Ob- 
servations on the Concept of "Witness," XIII, 
(17) Ideas for a Theology of Death, XIII. The 
readings average about thirty pages a class. No 
paper is required. There will be a final oral 
examination of one half hour. 
Wulf tange W 3 : 30-5 : 30 Spring 

JSTC T-493 

Theology of Hans Kung 

Extensive reading in the theology of Kung, 
especially his Christology and ecclesiology. His 
writings will be viewed as both reflective of, 
and critical of contemporary developments in 
Christianity and Catholicism. Accountability 
through participation in discussion and through 
brief reflection papers on the assigned readings. 
Schineller MW2-3:15 Fall 




77 



Theological Studies 

MTS T-414 

Studies in Reformed Theology 

A theological exploration of the distinctive 
character and components of Reformed 
theology. Emphasis upon an understanding of 
what "thinking within a tradition" is. Includes 
study of selected writings, including major 
figures and confessional documents. Special at- 
tention to the Confession of 1967, to determine 
whether and in what ways it is a Reformed 
document. 
Burkhart W 7-10 pm Spring 

NBTS T-455 
Liberal Theology 

An introduction to the major theologians (such 
as Schleiermacher, Ritschl, Harnack, Troeltsch) 
and the major issues (such as the rise of biblical 
criticism, the alliance of Christianity and 
Western culture) in nineteenth-century liberal 
theology. The course will examine the protest of 
twentieth-century neo-orthodoxy against 
liberalism. It will conclude with each student 
selecting a contemporary theologian and 
evaluating the extent to which the themes of 
classical liberalism reappear in his/her work. 
Finger MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Fall 

CTS TEC-410 
Religious Existentialism 

A study and evaluation of the thought of certain 
major existentialist writers. The work of such 
authors as Kierkegaard, Berdyaev, Marcel, 
Buber, and Jaspers is considered. 
LeFevre M 7-10 pm Fall 

JSTC T-488 

Introduction to Process Theology 

Initial lectures, selected readings, and 
discussions on the process thought of Whitehead 
will move into a consideration of contemporary 
process theology and religious experience. Short 
reports and a final written or oral examination. 
Montague M 3 : 30-5 : 30 Spring 

NBTS T-465 
Theologies of Hope 

An examination of movements in the late 
nineteenth and early twentieth century which 
provide the background for the contemporary 
theology of hope (e.g., liberal theology, the 
early theology of Barth and Brunner). The work 
of Pannenberg and Moltmann will then be ex- 
plored in detail. Finally, students will have op- 
portunity to select and work on other 
theologians and movements which have themes 
in common with the theology of hope. 
Finger MF 3 : 10-4 : 40 Winter 



CTU T-448 

Third World and Theology of Liberation 

After locating the theology of liberation within 
the broader framework of the task of theology, 
the course will explore in depth the various 
dimensions of liberation theology with par- 
ticular reference to the "Third World." 
Fuellenbach MW2-3:15 Winter 

LSTC T-456 
Liberation Theology 

This course aims to analyze the nature, func- 
tion, and method of liberation theology in order 
that the student may become aware of its poten- 
tial as serious theological discourse comparable 
to other classical theologies. Attention is given 
to some of the main theological issues and 
problems which can be anticipated in the study 
of liberation theology. 
Pero TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

MTS T-436 

Karl Marx and Christian Theology 

This course is designed to familiarize the student 
with the basic work and concept of Karl Marx. 
Particular attention will be given to his concepts 
on alienation, social change, historical 
materialism, ideology, and his understanding of 
the nature and meaning of religion as well as the 
influence of Marx in Latin American Theology 
of Liberation. 
Garcia M 2-5 Spring 

M/L E-425 

John Dewey : Religious Social Ethics 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Engel TBAr Spring 

BTS E-565 

The Ethics of Paul Tillich 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Miller M 7-9 :30 pm Fall 

CTS CH-580 

Studies in the History of Christian Thought 

A seminar dealing with the principal writings of 
a major figure. The writer will be considered 
both in the context of his own time and in terms 
of his relevance to contemporary theology. In 
1978: Bonhoeffer 
Jennings M 1 : 30-4 : 30 Spring 

JSTC T-547 

Rahner's Theology of Trinity and Christology 
This course is a series of lectures which treat of 
Rahner's Theology of the Trinity and 
Christology. The following articles, which are 



78 



to be found in the various volumes of 
Theological Investigations, will be treated. (1) 
Remarks on the Dogmatic Treatise "De 
Trinitate," IV, (2)The Theology of the Symbol, 
IV, (3) Current Problems in Christology, I, (4) 
The Eternal Significance of the Humanity of 
Jesus for our Relationship with God, III, (5) On 
the Theology of the Incarnation, IV, (6) 
Dogmatic Questions on Easter, IV, (7) 
Christology within an Evolutionary View of the 
World, V, (8) Dogmatic Reflection on the 
Knowledge and Self-Consciousness of Christ, V, 

(9) One Mediator and Many Mediations, IX, 

(10) Christology in the Setting of Modern Man's 
Understanding of Himself and of His World, XI, 

(11) Human Aspects of the Birth of Christ, XIII, 

(12) The Quest for Approaches to an Un- 
derstanding of the Mystery of God-Man Jesus, 
XII, (13) Remarks on the Importance of the 
History of Jesus for Catholic Dogmatics, XIII, 

(14) The Two Basis Types of Christology, XIII. 
No paper is required. There will be a final oral 
examination of one half hour. The readings 
average about thirty pages a class. 

Wulf tange M 3 : 30-5 : 30 Fall 

JSTC T-548 

Rahner's Theology of the Church 
This course is a series of lectures which treat of 
Rahner's Theology of the Church. The following 
articles, which are to be found in the various 
volumes of Theological Investigations, will be 
treated. (1) Freedom in the Church, II, (2) 
Peaceful Reflections on the Parochial Principle, 
II, (3) Notes on the Lay Apostolate, II, (4) 
Reflection on the Concept of "Ius Divinum" in 
Catholic Thought, V, (5) On the Theology of 
the Council, V, (6) Dogmatic Notes on "Ec- 
clesiological Piety," V, (7) The Church of Sin- 
ners, VI, (8) What Is Heresy?, V, (9) The Sinful 
Church in the Decrees of Vatican II, VI, (10) 
The Church and the Parousia of Christ, VI, (11) 
The New Image of the Church, X, (12) On the 
Relationship between the Pope and the College 
of Bishops, X, (13) The Presence of the Lord in 
the Christian Community at Worship, X, (14) 
On the Presence of Christ in the Diaspora, X, 

(15) Dialogue in the Church, X. The readings 
average about thirty -five pages a class. No 
paper is required. There will be a final oral 
examination of one half hour. 

Wulf tange M 3:30-5:30 Spring 

JSTC T-549 

Rahner's Theology of the Spiritual Life I 

This course is a series of lectures which treat of 



Theological Studies 

Rahner's Theology of the Spiritual Life. The 
following articles, which are to be found in the 
various volumes of Theological Investigations, 
will be treated. (1) Reflections on the Problem 
of the Gradual Ascent to Christian Perfection, 
III, (2) Thoughts on the Theology of Christmas, 
III, (3) Reflections on the Theology of Renun- 
ciation, III, (4) The Passion and Asceticism, III, 
(5) The Church of the Saints, III, (6) Some 
Thoughts on a Good Intention, III, (7) The 
Dogma of the Immaculate Conception in our 
Spiritual Life, III, (8) The Comfort of Time, III, 
(9) The Eucharist and Suffering, III, (10) The 
Renewal of Priestly Ordination III, (11) The 
Meaning of Frequent Confession of Devotion, 
III, (12) Problems Concerning Confession, III, 
(13) The Apostolate of Prayer, III, (14) A 
Spiritual Dialogue at Evening: on Sleep, Prayer 
and other Subjects, III, (15) Priestly Existence, 
III, (16) The Consecration of the Layman to the 
Care of Souls, III, (17) The Ignatian Mysticism 
of Joy in the World, III, (18) Priest and Poet, 

III, (19) Poetry and the Christian, IV, (20) 
Theological Remarks on the Problem of Leisure, 

IV, (21) The Theology of Power, IV. The 
readings average about thirty pages a class. No 
paper required. There will be a final oral 
examination of one half hour. Initial session at 
JSTC. 

Wulf tange W 3:30-5:30 Fall 

JSTC T-550 

Rahner's Theology of the Spiritual Life II 
This course is a series of lectures which treat of 
Rahner's Theology of the Spiritual Life. The 
following articles, which are to be found in the 
various volumes of Theological Investigations, 
will be treated. (1) Some Theses of Prayer "In 
the Name of the Church," V, (2) The "Com- 
mandment" of Love in Relation to the Other 
Commandments, V, (3) The Saving Force and 
Healing Power of Faith, V, (4) Christian Living 
Formerly and Today, VII, (5) Being Open to 
God as ever Greater, VII, (6) Intellectual 
Honesty and Christian Faith, VII, (7) Do Not 
Stifle the Spirit, VII, (8) The Christian in his 
World, VII, (9) I Believe in the Church, VII, (10) 
On Truthfulness, VII, (11) Parresia (Boldness), 

VII, (12) The Works of Mercy and their 
Reward, VII, (13) Proving Oneself in Time of 
Sickness, VII, (14) On Christian Dying, VII, 
(15) Why and How Can We Venerate the Saints, 

VIII, (16) All Saints, VIII, (17) Ideas for a 
Theology of Childhood, VIII, (18) The 
Sacramental Basis for the Role of the Layman in 




79 



Theological Studies 

the Church, VIII, (19) The Position of Woman 
in the New Situation in which the Church Finds 
Herself, VIII. The readings average about thirty 
pages a class. No paper is required. There will 
be a final oral examination of one half hour. 
Wulf tange W 3 : 30-5 : 30 Winter 

JSTC T-563 

Rahner's Theology of Grace, Anonymous 
Christianity, Development of Dogma and 
Mystery 

This course is a series of lectures which treat of 
Rahner's Theology of Grace, Anonymous 
Christianity, Development of Dogma and 
Mystery. The following articles, which are to be 
found in the various volumes of Theological In- 
vestigations, will be treated. (1) Concerning the 
Relationship between Nature and Grace, I, (2) 
Some Implications of the Scholastic Concept of 
Uncreated Grace, I, (3) Nature and Grace, IV, 
(4) Questions of Controversial Theology on 
Justfication, IV, (5) Anonymous Christians, VI, 
(6) On the Theology of the Ecumenical 
Discussion, XI, (7) Atheism and Implicit 
Christianity, IX, (8) Church, Churches and 
Religions, X, (9) The Development of Dogma, I, 
(10) Considerations on the Development of 
Dogma, IV (11) The Concept of Mystery in 
Catholic Theology, IV. The readings average 
about thirty pages a class. No paper is required. 
There will be a final oral examination of one 
half hour. 
Wulf tange M 3 : 30-5 : 30 Winter 

MTS T-536 

Seminar : Readings in the Philosophy and 

Theology of Paul Ricoeur 

Discussion of selected works of Paul Ricoeur, 
with stress on the question of his contribution to 
contemporary theological reflection. Prerequi- 
sites: introductory and intermediate work in 
theology, knowledge of the history of 
philosophy. 
Mudge M2-5 Winter 

CTU T-542 

Process Thought and Christian Faith 

A study of process insights and categories and 
their growing impact on contemporary 
theology. The main task of this introduction is 
seen as thematic, exploring such topics as : faith 

as human phenomenon; a process her- 
meneutic; comparisons between Whitehead and 
De Chardin; immanence and the principle of 
creative transformation; dipolar theism and the 
question of its adequacy; the divine relativity; 



process Christology; the problem of evil, the 
problem of goodness. Emphasis on reading and 
discussion, with regular reports. 
Rausch MW 3 : 30-4 : 45 Spring 

CTS TEC-533 

Contemporary Process Theology and 

Social Ethics 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Schroeder Th 1:30-4:30 Spring 

C. ISSUES AND TOPICS 

MTS T-399, 499, 599 
Independent Study 

Members of the department By arrangement 

MTS T-315 

Hispanic -American Cultural Resources for 

Theological Reflection 

Recent writings by Hispanic authors offer 
cultural resources for theological reflection. 
Selected sources will be examined for the pur- 
pose of gleaning those contributions which lend 
themselves to such reflections. 
Armendariz F 9-12 Spring 

MTS T-432 

Feminist Perspectives in Theology 

The course will deal with theological develop- 
ments given impetus by the women's 
movement, including the work of women 
theologians (e.g., Letty Russell, Mary Daly). 
These theologians will be examined in relation 
to systematic theology and to social theory 
(e.g., Peter Berger). 
Adjunct Tu 7-10 pm Fall 

CTSTEC-455(1V2 QH) 

Seminar in Contemporary Black Authors 

in Religion 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings . 

Rooks M 7-8:30 pm Winter 

JSTC H-416 

Patristic Interpretation of Christianity 

For course description consult Historical Studies 

offerings. 

Burns /Haight Th 2-5 Fall 

JSTC H-424 

Medieval and Reformed Interpretations of 

Christianity 

For course description consult Historical Studies 

offerings. 

Wicks/Haight MW 1:30-3 Winter 



80 



Theological Studies 



NBTS T-454 

Recent Theological Thought 

The trends of the nineteenth century, stressing 
idealism, humanism, and existentialism will be 
surveyed as background to the twentieth cen- 
tury. The course will concentrate on such 
theologians as Barth, Brunner, Bultmann, 
Bonhoeffer, the Niebuhrs, Ferre, Tillich, Pan- 
nenberg, and Moltmann. Prerequisites: NBTS 
Systematic Theology I or equivalent or per- 
mission of instructor. 
Young Th 1:10-3:40 Fall 

NBTS T-468 

Modern Religious Movements 

A study of the theological teachings of the main 
religious movements of today. The course will 
include the Adventists, Christian Science, 
Jehovah's Witnesses, Latter Day Saints, 
Unification Church, Worldwide Church of God, 
Theosophy, Bahai, and others. 
Young Th 9:30-12 Spring 

CTU T-445 

Theology of the Church 

A study of the origins of the Church; the 
relation of the Kingdom to the Church; the 
basic images and themes in Scripture and 
tradition; the development of ecclesiastical of- 
fice; and the relation of the Church to the 
world, especially in relation to the socio- 
political situation of "Third World" countries. 
Fullenbach MWF 12-12: 50 Winter 

CCTS 1-425 

Can The Church Be Christian? 

For course description consult In- 
terdisciplinary/Integrative Studies offerings. 
W. Thompson/Burkhart W 2-5 Winter 

JSTC T-449 

Experience and Theology 

Experience is the ground of theology both in its 
beginning and in its transformations. This course 
will consider methods of uncovering one's 
own life experience, integrating that with more 
general experience, and using both to reun- 
derstand one's theology. Some lectures, 
readings, discussion, and personal exercises in 
experiential theology. A final paper integrating 
in more detail some area of experience and 
theology. 
Sears TTh 9-10:15 Fall 

CTS TEC-480 

Theology and Human Development 

Reflection on the implications for a theological 



understanding of human existence of a develop- 
mental perspective (developmental theory such 
as that of Erikson, Piaget, Kohlberg, etc. and 
the life stages). 
LeFevre TTh 9-10:30 Spring 

CTS TEC-466 
Psychosyn thesis 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 
Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction offerings. 
Foster M 1-4 Fall 

MTS T-428 

Studies in the Christian Life 

A seminar examining representative approaches 

to selected dimensions of human existence in 

Christian perspective. The resources of classical 

and contemporary wisdom will be used, with 

particular emphasis to the contribution of 

Christian wisdom. Topics include freedom, 

love, joy, and responsibility. The topic for 

1977-78 is love. 

Parker M7-10pm Winter 

CTS TEC-425 

Love and Justice in Christian Thought 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Meyners WF 1-3 Fall 

JSTC T-490 

The Theology of Discerning "God's Will" 

A study of the topic of discernment in Scripture 
and Tradition with a consideration of the 
theological issues involved in either individual 
or communal discernment, along with some 
solution to the issues. Prerequisite: basic Scrip- 
ture and Systematic Theology. At least five 
must register for credit. Lecture, assigned 
readings and reports, discussion. Paper 
required. 

Doyle/Schineller Th 3:30-5:30 Spring 

JSTC T-483 

Everlasting Life After Death 
The course is mainly concerned with these basic 
questions: Will men actually have life after 
death? What connection is there between a 
man's life before death and his life after death? 
Does a man have life immediately after death 
and does this life continue in an interim state 
that perdures until the general judgment and 
what kind of life is this? Does a man go on 
living endlessly after the general resurrection 
and what kind of life does he have in this final 
state? Textbook: Everlasting Life After Death 
(Alba House). Initial session at JSTC. 
Foreman Th 1:30-3:15 Fall 




81 



Theological Studies 



BTS T-459 

Theology and Literary Arts 

A study of various images of heroism in the 
American imagination through selected novels 
and plays. Particular attention will be given tc 
the interplay between such themes as forest and 
settlement, individual and community, in- 
nocence and maturation, and the fate of the 
lonely "hero" in relation to the "alien tribe." 
Initial session at BTS. 
Groff/ Allen M 3:30-6 Spring 

CTS TEC-442 

Sociology of Religion: Historical 

Primary attention is given to the theoretical 
frameworks of Weber and Durkheim. 
Schroeder Th 1 : 30-4 : 30 Win ter 

CCTS T-472 

Communicating the Religious Message in an 

Age of Science 

In this course the following goals will guide the 
study: (1) to introduce students to theologies 
and theologians which seek explicitly to address 
the contemporary scientific and technological 
worldview; (2) to acquaint students with basic 
work in philosophy of science and theological 
methodology which are relevant to such 
theological address; and (3) to assist students 
who are already familiar with matters represen- 
ted by goals (1) and (2) further to advance their 
understandings in these and/or related areas. In 
approaching such goals two methods will be 
emphasized: (1) individual tutorial sessions 
which will help the student to advance at 
his/her own pace, to deal with new per- 
spectives, and to prepare a research paper; and 
(2) seminar sessions which will deal with 
readings corresponding to the first two goals 
mentioned above. Readings in theology may in- 
clude issues such as those raised in Peacock's 
Science and the Christian Experiment, Teilhard 
de Chardin's Phenomenon of Man, Cobb's A 
Christian Natural Theology, as well as those 
treated in selected works of the convenors. 
Readings in the methodology and philosophy of 
science may include issues such as those dealt 
with in Gilkey's Religion and the Scientific 
Future, Barbour's Issues in Science and Religion. 
Kuhns's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 
Margenau's Open Vistas. Prerequisite: at least 
two courses in systematic or philosophical 
theology, and approval of the convenors. Scien- 
tific background helpful but not necessary. 
Burhoe/Riggan Th 2-5 Spring 



CCTS T-572 

Advanced Seminar in Theology and the 

Sciences 

The seminar is designed as a forum for papers 
by theological and scientific faculty and ad- 
vanced students. It seeks to move toward a 
theology which is solidly grounded in the best 
of today's scientific understandings and which 
at the same time may be dynamic in eliciting 
religious feelings and behavior characteristic of 
the best Christian tradition whereby persons are 
led to appreciate the reality of God's sovereign- 
ty and grace which are manifest in environing 
nature and in human forms, and to find thereby 
a new meaning, hope, sense of duty, and 
beatific perspective in God's realm. 

Each weekly session will be the occasion for the 
presentation and critical evaluation of one or 
more papers exploring an interpretation of 
historic religious doctrines in the light of the 
sciences. Among the historic religious doctrines 
that may be interpreted are such primary 
Christian categories as God, Creation, Human 
Nature, Sin, Salvation, Church, Revelation, and 
Mission to the World. No specific topic is ex- 
cluded per se, no matter how out of theological 
favor it may presently be or how seemingly in- 
congruous with recent secular doctrine. For the 
seminar, the light of the sciences will be sought 
primarily through focus upon the so-called 
"hard" sciences that have provided a new world 
view or "metaphysics." These sciences include, 
physics, biology, sociobiology, and psycho- 
biology. However, this primary focus does not 
exclude perspectives from the psychosocial 
sciences, which will also be heavily involved. At 
the core of this activity the seminar will explore 
and test a basic hypothesis: that recent scientific 
information suggests that evolving 
psychobiological and sociobiological systems 
require religions as value cores, that the 
traditional religion of each culturetype has been 
selected for the same kinds of life-producing 
wisdom as have been selected in the genotypes 
for all animal organisms and societies, and that 
all of this is generated and selected by a creative 
system of dynamic reality far transcending any 
of its creatures. 

Admission for credit: While the seminar is ex- 
pected primarily to involve the presentation of 
papers by faculty and advanced students, ad- 
mission for credit is also open to other students 



82 



Theological Studies 



whose proposals for a paper to be presented and 
whose background in theology and science is 
deemed satisfactory by the convenors. High per- 
formance in CCTS T-472 may be deemed suf- 
ficient for admission, and capacity to discuss 
critically and to advance themes such as those 
published in Zygon, Journal of Religion and 
Science would provide excellent grounding for 
any participants in the seminar. 

Admission without credit: Participation is also 
open to Cluster students and faculty who have a 
concern to become more informed about and/or 
to participate in this research and development 
program without obligating themselves to meet 
the specific course requirements. Such persons 
should inform one of the convenors in advance 
of their intention to participate in this manner. 

Requirements for students taking the seminar 
for credit will be (1) to present an original paper 
of some 20-30 doublespaced pages (during one 
of the last five weeks of the quarter) on a topic 
approved by the convenors and to defend it suc- 
cessfully during its discussion, and (2) to present 
a one- or two-page critical and constructive 
analysis of the proceedings of each of the other 
papers and discussions in the seminar sessions. 
Sessions held at home of Dr. Burhoe, 1524, E. 
59th St., Chicago. 
Burhoe/Riggan Tu 7-10 pm Spring 

CCTS T-559 

Developments in Modern Theology, Protestant 

and Catholic 

Using a discussion-group format involving the 
active participation of all members, this course 
will investigate such fundamental Christian 
themes as the relationship of religion and 
Christianity, God and his providence and grace, 
Christ and the church, in selected texts from 
such theologians as Schleiermacher, Ritschl, 
Harnack, Loisy, Blondel, Barth, Tillich, Rahner, 
Pannenberg, Metz. Enrollment limited to 14; 
admission by approval of instructor. 
Braaten/Haight MW 1:30-3 Spring 

CTU T-599 
M.A. Seminar 

The seminar is open to all M.A. students who 
are preparing their Comprehensive 
Examinations and/or Thesis, and others by 
special arrangement with the professor. It will 
explore theological methodology as understood 
by B. Lonergan and D. Tracy, as background 
for comparison and contrast with 



methodological considerations peculiar to the 

student's area of specialization. 

Vanasse Th 2-4:30 Fall 

CTU T-505 

Constructing Local Theologies 

A seminar geared to investigating how Christian 
theological themes are developed in varying 
situations, particularly those not part of main- 
stream Western culture. Students will be asked 
to choose a certain situation (e.g., Latino, 
Black, African, Japanese) and engage in recon- 
structing some theological themes based upon 
their own background in the Western Christian 
tradition and on experience or guided reading in 
the particular cultural situation. Prior consent 
of the instructor required for admission. 
Schreiter Tu 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

CCTS T-518 

Seminar on Black Worship and Liturgical 

Tradition 

An exploration of the potential for enrichment 
of the Western liturgical heritage by the Black 
experience of worship. Special attention will be 
given to basic principles of liturgical prayer as 
they are operative in Black worship and to the 
questions of liturgical "adaptation" called for in 
development of worship patterns truly Black 
and truly Catholic. 
Keif er /Wright Th 2-4 : 30 Win ter 

CTS TEC-501 
Selfhood 

A seminar considering psychological, 
philosophical, and theological dimensions of the 
problem of selfhood. 
LeFevre M7-10pm Spring 

JSTC T-584 

C. G. Jung and Theology 

A study of the theological implications of 
Jungian therapy and thought focused toward in- 
terrelating psychotherapy and theology. Basic 
readings in Jung (more advanced for those 
acquainted with him), lecture and discussion on 
theological evaluation of him: myth and sym- 
bol, individuation process, trinity and femininity 
within. Accountability will be an oral exam on 
Jung and a paper evaluating theologically some 
aspect of his thought. 
Sears TTh 9-10:15 Spring 

JSTC T-590 

Mysteries of Christ's Life For Today 

A consideration of the mysteries of Christ's life, 
death and resurrection based on the best and 
latest exegesis and systematic theology and 




83 



Ethical Studies 



pointed toward pastoral relevance, not only for 

liturgy but as subjects for prayer and 

meditation. Prerequisites: basic Christology and 

Scripture. Lectures and discussion. Paper 

required. 

Doyle Th 3:30-5:30 Fall 

JSTC T-524 
Demonology 

The course aims 1) to study the so-called 
'diabolic' phenomena, Possession, Magic, Witch- 
craft, Divination, Prophecy, Satanism 
(especially against the background of modern 
parapsychological claims), to try to determine 
whether they really involve 'diabolic' activity or 
are capable of another explanation; 2) to 
evaluate the biblical and ecclesial evidence for 
the existence of Satan and devils, since their 
existence is often bluntly denied today. 
Fortman Th 1 : 30-3 : 15 Win ter 

DIT T-590 (2 or 3 QH) 

Directed Readings on Selected Topics 

Tutorials in various subjects offered under this 
title. Consult professor for topic in which you 
are interested. Offered in response to student in- 
terest. 
Falanga/Minogue TBAr TBAr 

LSTC T-610 

The Nature of Religious Language 

A study of the nature of mythic and symbolic 
language and its usage in biblical, theological, 
and liturgical materials. Readings in recent 
literature on the subject, from Ian Ramsay 
through Paul Ricoeur. For post-M.Div stu- 
dents. Admission of others by approval of in- 
structor. 
Sherman MW 3-4:15 Winter 

LTSC T-601 

Graduate Theological Seminar 

Graduate students in the historical and 
theological fields will make presentations based 
on their specialized interests and scholarly 
research. The method of the seminar will be to 
distribute, discuss and critically examine the 
papers of class participants. For post-M.Div. 
students. Admission of others by approval of 
instructor. 
Braaten Th 2-4:30 Fall 

MTS T-648 

Contemporary Problems in Theology and 

Ministry 

The course is designed to integrate theological 
materials and the practical experience of the 



class through the use of case-study. The cases 
will be made available the first day of class. 
Parker July 4-8, TBAn Summer 1977 



IV. ETHICAL STUDIES 

A. METHODS AND PRINCIPLES 

CTS TEC-321 
Christian Ethics 

Historical and contemporary Christian ethical 
systems with a consideration of their im- 
plications and current significance. 
Schroeder MW 1:30-3 Spring 

CTU E-370 

Introduction to Moral Theology 

This course is intended for students who have 
had no systematic approach to moral theology. 
The stress here will be on the basic principles 
guiding human action and attitude, in so far as 
they are compatible with the essentials of 
Christian tradition and suitable for facilitating 
conscience formation and decision-making in 
the face of modern conflicts and problems. 
Nairn MWF 11-11:50 Winter 

CTU E-374 

Introduction to Catholic Social Teaching 

This course will analyze the major social en- 
cyclicals of the 20th century as well as the 
documents on social justice from the II Vatican 
Council and the 1971 Roman Synod. Brief con- 
sideration will also be given to the history of 
social involvement by the American Catholic 
Church. 
Pawlikowski W 7-9:30 pm Winter 

DIT E-341 

Principles of Christian Morality 

The course will focus on the principles and 
processes involved in Christian decision 
making. It will consider the formation of con- 
science from the viewpoint of a faculty 
psychology, from a developmental viewpoint, 
and from the viewpoint of Lonergan's in- 
tentional analysis. Human freedom and respon- 
sibility will be considered in their psychological 
and theological dimensions. The basics of 
natural law and the possibility of a formal 
existential ethic will be treated. 
Minogue WF 1-2:15 Spring 

JSTC E-335, 336 (2 full courses) 
Contemporary Christian Ethics I, II 

Goals: to help participants develop an un- 



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derstanding of the sources and directions of 
current moral analysis in preparation for 
ministry in the Church of today and tomorrow. 
The program runs for two quarters, taken in 
sequence. Other than JSTC students admitted 
by permission of instructor. 
Content: two sections of material, not coter- 
minous with the two quarters: 

1. Study of the structure of contemporary 
Christian Ethics by reference to its historical 
development in purpose, content, and 
method, both within and outside of the 
Roman Catholic tradition. 

2. Exploration of a systematic and constructive 
Christian Ethic, both individual and social, 
suitable to meet the needs of today's 
evolving ministry. Deals with such topics 
as: (a) human freedom and grace within the 
religious context of moral decision; (b) the 
process of decision and the development of 
moral norms to direct decision within the 
dialogic Christian community; (c) the 
process of formation of conscience and of 
reason-giving; (d) the characteristics of vir- 
tuous or vicious decision- taking and its im- 
pact on both person and community. 

Participants will share readings, lectures, and 
class discussions in dealing with the two sec- 
tions, and will be expected to submit written 
reflections at the end of each section on the 
material covered. 

Bresnahan/LaVerdiere TTh 10 : 30-11 : 45 Fall 
Bresnahan and Staff TTh 10 : 30-11 : 45 Winter 

LSTC E-310 
Christian Ethics 

A study of the sources, structure, and dynamics 
of Christian ethics, with reference to current 
problems of personal and public life. 
Benne TTh 10:45-12 Fall 

Sherman MWF9-9:50 Winter 

MTS E-313 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

Through lectures, papers, and discussion, there 
will be an investigation into the biblical, 
theological and historical foundations that in- 
form the Christian life. In this course there will 
be an emphasis upon fundamental questions of 
understanding the nature of a Christian ethic. 
Stotts TTh 11-1 Fall 

CCTS E-451 
Christian Ethics 

The aim of this course is to investigate the 
Christian approach to the main social issues of 



today. Consideration will be given to the 
biblical and theological basis for social action. 
Central social issues, including the socio- 
economic and political structure, personal and 
civil rights, war and peace, labor and 
management, and interpersonal relations, will 
be studied. Special attention will be given to 
minority rights and social justice. Field trips to 
social institutions will be included. 
Young/Hodges MWF 10: 30-11: 20 Winter 
CTU E-489 

Introduction to Jewish Ethics 
The course will acquaint students with biblical 
and rabbinic ethics and how they compare to 
New Testament ethics. Attention will also be 
given to the works of a select number of modern 
Jewish ethical thinkers such as Martin Buber 
and Abraham Heschel. The final part of the 
course will briefly examine the ethical im- 
plications of certain issues in the contemporary 
Christian-Jewish dialogue, antisemitism among 
them. 
Pawlikowski W 7-9:30 pm Fall 

DIT E-443 
Social Justice 

The course will consider the social mission of 
the Church in the world. It will set the modern 
horizon via an analysis of the Enlightment, 
Marxism, capitalism, and secularism. Develop- 
ment of papal social teaching will be examined. 
Political theology, Liberation theology, and 
Theology of the Cross will be used to focus the 
question of the Church's social mission. 
Minogue MWF 10:10-11 Spring 

CTU E-471 

The Role of Experience in Moral Theology 

This is an advanced systematic course that 
proposes to make human experience, as un- 
derstood by John Dewey, the basis of an in- 
vestigation into the building blocks of a moral 
system that both satisfies the Christian im- 
peratives of tradition and the demands of daily 
living. 
MacDonald MWF 10-10:50 Winter 

B. THINKERS AND SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT 

CTU E-487 

The Ethical Dimensions of Marxist Humanism 
The course aims at introducing the student to 
the way in which the problem of man is set up 
and resolved in Marxist thought and praxis. It 
will study the way in which Marxism con- 
ceives, in theory and practice, a) the objective 




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Ethical Studies 



foundations of man's possibilities, b) the 
epistemological bases for the understanding of 
man and of human praxis, and c) the main 
thought categories and socio-political structures 
through which a human and humanizing praxis 
can be realized. While based on the texts of the 
founders of Marxism, the course will also trace 
the main variations which have developed in 
Marxism throughout its history and which are 
relevant in the present situation in Europe, Asia, 
Latin America and Africa. 
Fornasari MWF 11-11: 50 Fall 

M/L E-425 

John Dewey: Religious Social Ethics 

A reconsideration of the American pragmatic 
tradition of social ethics through a critical 
analysis of selected major texts by John Dewey. 
Engel TBAr Spring 

DIT E-531 (2 or 3 QH) 
St. Thomas on Human Acts 
This will be a reading course in the first forty- 
eight questions of the first part of the second 
book of the Summa Theologica. These 
questions cover the ultimate end of man, his 
volitional process, and his emotions. The basic 
methodology of the course will be reading and 
discussion. 
Minogue TBAr Fall 

DIT E-532 (2 or 3 QH) 

St. Thomas on Virtue and Sin 

This will be a reading course on questions forty- 
nine through ninety-four of the first part of the 
second book of the Summa Theologica. This is 
a consideration of the interior dispostions and 
dynamics that shape human activity and life. A 
short treatment of the exteriorization of these 
dispositions and dynamics in the natural law 
will be presented. Familiarization with 
Thomistic anthropology is a prerequisite for this 
course. The basic methodology of the course 
will be reading and discussion. 
Minogue TBAr Winter 

BTS E-565 

The Ethics of Paul Tillich 

A seminar study of the writings of Paul Tillich, 
especially the Systematic Theology, in order to 
discover his method, the fundamental concepts 
of his thought, and in order to assess the ap- 
plicability of his ideas to contemporary issues. 
Miller M 7-9 :3C pm Fall 

JSTC E-535 

Tutorial in Advanced Moral Theory 

Examination of the theological writings of Karl 



Rahner as they bear upon ethical theory and 
practice, including spiritual and social ministry, 
with attention to related materials of other con- 
temporary Christian ethicians. Prerequisite: 
JSTC E-335, 336 or equivalent. 
Bresnahan TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 

CTS TEC-533 

Contemporary Process Theology and Social 

Ethics 

This seminar will focus on the writings of the 
people informed by the philosophical theology of 
A. N. Whitehead. The writings will be selected 
from the work of such representative figures as 
William Beardslee, John Cobb, David Griffin, 
Charles Hartshorne, Bernard Lee, Bernard 
Meland, Schubert Ogden, Norman Pittenger, 
and Daniel Day Williams. 
Schroeder Th 1:30-4:30 Spring 

C. ISSUES AND TOPICS 

M/L E-321 

American Civil Religion 

A consideration of three fundamental historical 

strands in American Civil religion — biblical, 

Transcendentalist, and technological — and 

their implications for contemporary social 

ethics. 

Engel TBAr Fall 

M/L E-395 

American Civil Religion and Unitarian 

Universalism 

An inquiry into the varying social and 
theological relationships between the American 
democratic faith and the Unitarian and Univer- 
salist religious movements. 
Engel TBAr Winter 

LSTC E-432 

Human Destructiveness: Psychological, 

Sociological, Theological Dimensions 

A study of the phenomenon of violence in con- 
temporary life, with attention to both per- 
sonal/interpersonal and institutionalized forms, 
and using categories of analysis from various 
disciplines. Evaluation of the use of violence as 
a means of social change and of the effects of 
violence in films and television. 
Sherman M 7-10 pm Spring 

CCTS E-489 

The Church's Peace Ministry: Issues and 

Perspectives 

What can the churches contribute to world 
peace? What understandings of world peace 
might guide religious thought and action toward 



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Ethical Studies 



a world without war? What theological and 
political standards are involved in setting limits 
and determining priorities for peace activities? 
How can the concern for world peace become a 
regular part of ministry at every level of church 
life? Eight Chicago-area seminary faculty in- 
cluding the instructors of this course have met 
regularly as the curriculum development task 
force of the World Without War Council— Mid- 
west to design a course addressing these 
questions. The course is expected to treat such 
topics as: the global political conditions for 
peace; the means and limits of citizen action for 
peace in the United States, with special em- 
phasis on the role of the churches; and the 
theological bases for, and meanings of, the 
issues of global politics and citizen action. Class 
sessions will be held at North Park Theological 
Seminary, 5125 N. Spaulding Avenue, Chicago. 
Nelson/T. Thompson /Cluster Faculty Spring 

M 3:30-6 
CCTSE-401 

Theological Assessment of Contrasting Human 
Rights Traditions 

A critical assessment of the complementarity and 
contrast of American civil religion's focus on per- 
sonal civil rights and of the focus of Marxist 
forms of liberation theologies on social and 
economic rights, from biblical and theological 
perspectives. The course will be taught by an 
ecumenical faculty team related to the Faith and 
Order Commission of the National Council of 
Churches. Class sessions will be held at Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary, 2121 
Sheridan Road, Evanston. 

Will /Cunningham /Miller Fall 

Pawlikowski/Rigdon 

Sept. 30-Oct. 1, 
Nov. 4-5, Dec. 2-3 
F 2:30-5:30, S 9-4 pm 
BTS E-469 

Justice Issues in the Church 

An examination of the biblical concept of 
justice, and a consideration of several justice 
issues confronting the church today, from 
among topics such as criminal justice, human 
rights, triage ethics, energy distribution, and 
ethics of investment. 

Miller Th 9:30-12 Winter 

CTS TEC-425 

Love and Justice in Christian Thought 
A critical and constructive analysis of these 
ideas on the basis of an examination of the 
thought of Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, R. 



Niebuhr, Tillich, and Daniel D. Williams. 
Meyners WF 1-3 Fall 

NBTS E-452 

The Church and Social Change 

A study of the role of the Christian Church in 
affecting social change, both in the past and the 
present. A significant part of this study will 
focus on the roles of black churchmen and black 
congregations as change agents. 
Blanford Th 7-9:30 pm Spring 

LSTC E-435 

Christianity and Capitalism 
This course will first trace the historical relation 
between the Christian faith and the develop- 
ment of capitalism. It will then move toward 
contemporary interpretations — both positive 
and negative — of modern capitalism, and con- 
clude with a critique dealing with this question: 
How compatible is the Christian ethic with the 
capitalist system? 
Benne MW 1:30-2: 45 Fall 

CTU E-482 

Moral Dilemmas about Human Life 

This course attempts to relate the traditional 
concerns of medical ethics, including that of 
abortion, with such current issues as providing 
for and safe-guarding patient rights, computing 
the moment of death, genetic counseling and 
bio-ethics as it looms on the horizon. 
MacDonald TTh 10 : 30-11 : 45 Spring 

CTU E-481 

Sexual Ethics for the Christian 

This offering treats of sexuality and sexual 
behavior in the unmarried Christian. It intends 
to develop the kind of pastoral attitudes that 
will serve to guide Christian people, both in the 
development of attitudes toward sexuality, and 
positions toward sexual conduct, including pre- 
marital sex and homosexuality. 
MacDonald MWF 12-12: 50 Spring 

LSTC E-430 
Ethics of Sex 

A course aimed at examining, from a Christian 
point of view, issues dealing with the realm of 
the sexual — premarital sex, marital fidelity, 
homosexuality, gender, sexism, etc. 
Benne TTh 12 : 30-1 : 45 Winter 

CTSTEC-455(iy2QH) 

Seminar in Contemporary Black Authors in 

Religion 

A critical reading of such authors as J. and C. 

Cone, Roberts, Wilmore, and Jones. 

Rooks M 7-8 :30 pm Winter 




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Ethical Studies 



MTS E-435 

Women, Social Issues and Ethical 

Decision-Making 

The course will combine historical, cultural 
background, socio-economic analysis and prac- 
tical discussion and models of decision making. 
For each problem studied there will be 
background lectures on the cultural ideologies 
which have influenced our thinking on the sub- 
ject, including biblical, theological and general 
cultural materials. All of this received material 
will be critiqued. The socio-economic context of 
each problem will also be studied. Each student 
will work on a concrete case study in a specific 
area and present it to the class as an example of 
ethical decision making under particular cir- 
cumstances. Much of the work of the class will 
come to a focus in the discussion of these case 
studies. Each student will also be expected to in- 
vestigate one community agency that is dealing 
with a particular issue. These investigations will 
be reported to class. There will be an effort to 
draw up a profile of such groups working in the 
the Chicago area and the strengths and deficien- 
cies of such available groups for women's needs. 
Issues treated in the course will be drawn from 
the following areas: control of one's own body, 
violence, the individual and the couple, the 
domestic role of women, the home-work 
dichotomy and women at work. Prerequisite: 
one course in women's studies or background 
reading to be specified by the instructor. 
Ruether M 7-10 pm Spring 

DIT E-545 (2 or 3 QH) 
Freedom and Responsibility 

This seminar seeks to explore the reality of 
human freedom from a personal, theological, 
and communal dimension. The implications and 
structures of responsibility in classical and 
modern horizon will be examined. 
Minogue TBAr Spring 

CTU E-588 

The Mystery of Christ and Moral Structures 

This seminar is designed to study the im- 
plications of Christology for moral theology. 
The main sources for this study will be the work 
of Catholic and Protestant moralists, though, 
hopefully, something of an interdisciplinary fla- 
vor will also be added. The moral structures in 
question are issues such as law, conscience, sin, 
freedom and responsibility. 
MacDonald TTh 12-1 : 15 Fall 



CTU E-584 

Moral Issues in Economics and Business 

A brief introduction to modern economic 
theories; the relationship between Christianity 
and the origins of modern capitalism; a 
Christian critique of capitalism; the Corporate 
Responsibility movement. Approximately one- 
half of the course will be devoted to case studies 
of typical problems confronting businessmen 
today with a view to attaining group consensus 
about the just solutions to these issues. 
Requirements: preparation of case study 
materials; participation in class discussion; 
take-home exam or term paper of about 20 
pages. 
MacDonald/Pawlikowski Th 2-4:30 Winter 

CTU E-577 

Ethics and United States Foreign Policy 

After a brief overview of forces that have 
shaped the various trends in American foreign 
policy, the course will examine several im- 
portant issues in current debates about foreign 
policy today. These will include human rights 
and foreign policy, intervention in other coun- 
tries, foreign aid vs. development; food and 
foreign policy. The course will also treat of 
various viewpoints from ethicists as to how the 
conduct of foreign policy can be made more 
moral in tone. 
Pawlikowski TTh 12-1:15 Spring 

CTU E-580 

The Theology and Ethics of Christian Marriage 

This is an interdisciplinary study offering an 
overview of marriage in terms of its rich 
Christian tradition (Scripture, the Fathers and 
liturgical rites) and also attempting to 
systematize this material in view of reaching 
ethical decisions that are sensitive to such 
modern problems as divorce, contraception and 
new styles of marital relationship. 
MacDonald TTh 9-10:15 Fall 

DITE-546(2or3QH) 
Medical Ethics 

This seminar will review a traditional Catholic 
manual on medical-moral problems. A 
thorough analysis of the principle of double- 
effect will be attempted. Current theological 
thinking on the issues of care for the dying, ex- 
perimentation and genetic manipulation, 
sterilization will be examined. 
Minogue TBAr Winter 



88 



World Mission Studies 



JSTC E-538 

Legal Reasoning and Theological 

(Ethical) Reasoning 

Seminar to investigate similarities and dif- 
ferences between the manner in which common- 
law judges deal with decision-taking and reason- 
giving (in such matters as the right of privacy, 
freedom of speech, divorce, capital punishment, 
abortion), and the way in which ethicians, par- 
ticularly theological thinkers, approach the 
same or related issues. Emphasis will fall upon 
the possibility of cross-fertilizing between 
theological reasoning and legal reasoning in the 
context of distinctively pragmatic, North 
American characteristics of mind. Participants 
will be encouraged to add their own special in- 
terests in methodology to the comparison. Com- 
mon readings and discussion of examples allow- 
ing comparison will be followed by oral reports 
on areas of individual choice according to the in- 
terest of each participant, and by a final written 
reflection. Minimum enrollment: 10. 
Bresnahan M 7:30-9:45 pm Fall 

JSTC E-533 

Social Ethics and Legal Institutions 

Seminar to explore the relationship between 
ethical theory and practical, contemporary 
problem areas of legal regulation of human ac- 
tivity. An initial examination of selected aspects 
of the "natural law" tradition and of contrasting 
legal positivism through common readings and 
discussion, will be followed by choice of a par- 
ticular problem area in legal regulation of 
human activity, preparation of an oral presen- 
tation, and final written expression of some 
dimension of the participant's reflection on the 
problem. Such questions as criminal correction, 
abortion, prostitution, pornography, equal ac- 
cess to the courts, environmental pollution, 
planning of mass transportation, commitment 
procedures for the mentally ill, civil disobe- 
dience, conscientious objection, military justice 
system, political corruption, use of violence by 
police, can be chosen with a view to evaluating 
the present effectiveness of legal regulation and 
to suggesting alternative programs. Maximum 
enrollment: 12. 
Bresnahan M 7 : 30-9 : 45 pm Win ter 

DIT E-590 (2 or 3 QH) 
Selected Topics 

Tutorials in various subjects are offered under 
this rubric. Consult professor for topic in which 
you are interested. Offered in response to 



student interest. 
Minogue 



TBAr 



TBAi 



LSTC E-610 
Eros and Agape 

A seminar aimed at clarifying the kinds or 
forms of love. Study will focus on Nygren's 
Eros and Agape and Outka's Agape. For post- 
M.Div. students. Admission of others by ap- 
proval of instructor. 
Benne Th 2-4:30 Spring 

V. WORLD MISSION STUDIES 

CTU T-320 
Phenomenology of Religion 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Schreiter MWF 10-10: 50 Fall 

CTU T-331 

Culture and the Experience of God 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Pero MW 12-1: 15 Spring 

LSTC W-310 

World-Wide Christian Missions : An 

Introduction 

An introduction to significant theological issues 
and concrete expressions of mission in one 
world today. An effort is made to develop a 
holistic view of mission in ecumenical per- 
spective. Attention is given to Lutheran Church 
in America world mission and ecumenical in- 
volvement. 
Scherer MWF 11-11: 50 Fall 

NBTS W-321 

Introduction to the Mission of the Christian 

Church 

This course provides a basis for understanding 
the theological foundation for the Christian's 
mission as an individual and as a member of the 
Community of Faith through reading in 
biblical materials, theology and missiology. The 
student will be made aware of the need to relate 
the content of the faith through the culture of 
the recipient. Case studies from various mission 
endeavors will be utilized. 
Mcintosh Th 1:10-3:40 Winter 

CTU H-307 
Christianization of Europe 

For course description consult Historical Studies : 

Medieval offerings. 

Nemer MWF 9-9: 50 Winter 




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World Mission Studies 



CTU W-330 
Cultural Orientation 

A guided reading course open only to CTU 
students engaged in CCTS 1-560: Cross- 
Cultural Communication. The course provides 
guided reading in the social, historical, political 
and religious background of the country for 
which the student is preparing. 
Staff TBAr Spring 

CTU B-490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

For course description consult Old Testament 

offerings. 

Senior/Stuhlmueller MW2-3:15 Fall 

CTU T-445 

Theology of the Church 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Fuellenbach MWF 12-12: 50 Winter 

LSTC W-416 

Evangelism and Church Growth 

Briefly touching on the biblical basis, history 
and theology of evangelism, the course con- 
centrates on a broad range of current 
evangelism methodologies, e.g., personal, small 
group, campus and youth, preaching, parish 
renewal, pastoral, enabling of laity, urban, etc. 
Premises and priorities of the church growth 
movement are examined along with diagnostic 
aids, tools of measurement and evaluation of 
results. 
Scherer TTh 12 : 30-1 : 45 Win ter 

CTU W-440 

Christianity in World History : the Question 

of Prophecy Today 

To provide a basis for discussion this seminar 
will first scrutinize Arend Th. Van Leeuwen's 
hypothesis on the development of Western 
civilization and its consequences for the con- 
temporary mission of the Church. Once this 
theory is understood and critiqued the course 
will examine how Old Testament prophecy 
relates to a prophetic stance in today's world. 
Particular attention will be given to the 
question: is the "prophet" today a maker of 
history or a witness to transcendence? 
Boberg MW 3 : 30-4 : 45 Winter 

CTU H-422 

19th Century Imperialism and World Mission 

For course description consult Historical Studies : 

Modern offerings. 

Nemer MWF 11-11: 50 Spring 



LSTC T-456 
Liberation Theology 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Pero TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

CTU T-448 

Third World and Theology of Liberation 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Fuellenbach MW2-3:15 Winter 

LSTC W-417 

America in Third World Perspective 

Frustrations with health care, a crisis in 
educational systems, the slow pace of women's 
liberation, questions about the meaning of 
work, and the role of religion in society and 
culture: these are vital areas of concern in 
America and throughout the world. Using a 
comparative method, the course will examine 
approaches to these five problems in Third 
World countries with different social systems — 
People's Republic of China, Tanzania, and 
Cuba — in order to gain perspective for dealing 
with the same problems in America. 
Scherer MW 1 : 30-2 : 45 Spring 

LSTC W-415 

Faith and Culture in Japanese Perspective 
A consideration of some problems faced by Ja- 
panese Christians, such as their relationship to 
the state, to the common religions and customs of 
the community, and to various religious con- 
cepts, aimed at increasing self-understanding by 
the encounter with different cultural per- 
spectives. Application will be made to the 
problem of confessing the faith within the 
student's own cultural context. 
Ishii TTh 12:30-1:45 Fall 

CTU E-487 

The Ethical Dimensions of Marxist Humanism 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Fornasari MWF 11-11: 50 Fall 

MTS T-436 

Karl Marx and Christian Theology 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Garcia M 2-5 Spring 

LSTC W-427 

Christian Faith and the New Religions 

The course seeks to comprehend the at- 
tractiveness of some "new religions" and Eastern 
cults which challenge Christian churches on 



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Ministry Studies: Nature and Functions of Ministry 



their home ground. Selected new religions will 
be studied from various perspectives, and issues 
raised for Christian faith and pastoral leader- 
ship, especially among youth, will be examined. 
Local resources and field trips will be utilized. 
Scherer TTh 12:30-1:45 Spring 

CTU T-441 

Christology and Cultures 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Schreiter MWF 12-12: 50 Fall 

CTU T-436 

Eschatology and Eschatologies 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Schreiter MWF 10-10: 50 Spring 

CTU W-497 

Mission Integration Seminar 

This seminar is limited to students returning 
from a cross-cultural program. Building on their 
recent experience and present reenculturation 
process, this seminar will help the participants 
to recognize the particular dynamics of the reen- 
culturation process and through group support 
and critique to use these dynamics to integrate 
and further develop their Christian com- 
mitment, ministerial identity, and missionary 
formation. 
Staff By arrangement only Fall 

CTU W-545 

Cultural Anthropology 

Introduction to essential concepts of cultural an- 
thropology with application to missionary 
work. 
Barbour W 7-9:30 pm Fall 

CTU W-535 

Development of the Christian Community 

After a brief survey of the biblical /theological 
basis, this seminar type course emphasizes the 
sociological factors that bear on the process of 
Christian community formation and its relation- 
ship to community development on the socio- 
economic plane. 
Boberg MW 3: 30-4: 45 Fall 

CTU T-505 

Constructing Local Theologies 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Schreiter Tu 7-9 :30 pm Winter 



CTU W-563 

Religious Education in Cross-Cultural 

Perspective 

Research seminar in religious educational 
systems among Black, Latino, and Native 
American children with 1) inquiry into the 
traditional religious educational systems offered 
to white children and its impact on minority 
children; 2) focus on a minority church which 
has developed or is in the process of developing 
a minority educational system, and study of the 
uniqueness of this process; 3) identification and 
assessment of minority religious educational 
model(s) which can be instrumental in guiding 
further research in this area. (Limited to stu- 
dents with previous experience in religious 
education and in cross-cultural ministry, or with 
consent of instructor.) 
Barbour W 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

CTU W-530 

Research Seminar in Area Studies 

Individually guided reading program in the 

history and culture of specific countries, as well 

as their present social, economic and religious 

situation. 

Boberg F 2-4:30 Winter 

CCTS E-560 (2 or 3 full courses) 
Cross-Cultural Communication: Intensive 
Unit I 

For course description consult In- 
terdisciplinary/Integrative Studies offerings. 
Armendariz/Barbour/ M 9-3 Spring 

Boberg/Pero W 3 : 30-9 : 30 pm 

VI. MINISTRY STUDIES 

A. NATURE AND FUNCTIONS OF MINISTRY 
JSTC M-383 
Effective Pastoral Ministry I 

Two theoretical orientations are making im- 
portant contributions to the emerging un- 
derstanding of contemporary ministry: (1) the 
theological disciplines through renewed un- 
derstanding of revelation, ecclesiology and the 
variety of ministries in the Christian tradition, 
and (2) the behavioral sciences through a better 
understanding of leadership styles, com- 
munication skills and the strategies of 
organization development. This experience - 
based course will call upon these two forces to 
serve as the context in which the participants' 
awareness of their own ministry and confidence 
in that ministry is heightened, and constructive 
alternatives to ineffective styles of ministry are 




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Ministry Studies: Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction 



suggested. The one-on-one ministerial context 
will be emphasized. Special attention will be 
given to the assessment and enhancement of the 
basic skills of learning, assertion and self- 
disclosure. Auditing or late registration not per- 
mitted. 
Myers /Egan/ Sears W 12:30-3:20 Fall 

JSTC M-384 

Effective Pastoral Ministry II 
This course continues the cognitive and ex- 
periential skill development begun in Effective 
Pastoral Ministry I. Ministry to primary groups, 
task groups, and community provide the con- 
text in which the skill components of group 
process, need assessment, conflict resolution, 
and systematic planning will be exercised. Dif- 
ferences and relationships between these three 
contexts will also be discussed. Auditing or late 
registration not permitted. Prerequisite: JSTC 
M-383. 
Myers/Egan /Sears W 12 : 30-3 : 20 Spring 

M/L M-391 

Introduction to Liberal Church and Ministry 

A continuing seminar exploring models and 
problems for the practice of the liberal ministry 
today in its various associational contexts. 
Meserve TBAr Fall 

NBTS M-375 
Ministerial Duties 

The course explores the whole concept of the 
ministry and its duties. The organization and 
program of the local church receives attention in 
its relation to the community, the 
denomination, and the world mission. 
Buzzard MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Spring 

NBTS M-371 
Contemporary Evangelism 

This unit focuses on the evangelistic mission of 
the church for today. It gives special attention 
to effective means by which the outreach of the 
church can be extended in our society. The 
course seeks to maintain a practical emphasis 
which keeps in mind the needs of the local 
parish. 
Brown Th 1:10-3:40 Fall 

CTSCM-305(1V2QH) 
Ministry in the Black Church 

An examination of the role and function of the 
Black minister in the U.S., including varieties of 
ministry and differences of style among them. 
Rooks M 3:30-5 Fall 



MTS M-310 
Women in Ministry 

An introductory course designed for women 
who want to explore the opportunities, 
problems and concerns encountered by women 
in ministry. Students will be introduced, 
through dialogue and interviews, to the varieties 
of ministries in which women are engaged (e.g., 
chaplaincy, staff and administrative positions, 
pastor, campus ministry). The meaning of or- 
dination, role expectations and the dynamics of 
sexism will be discussed. Special attention will 
be given to preaching, liturgy, theology and 
counseling from the woman's perspective. 
A. Hayes /Prasse MW 2-4 Fall 

NBTS M-462 
Hispanic Ministry 

The course will focus on the special concerns 
and issues of Hispanic ministry, particularly in 
an urban setting. 
TBAn M 7-9:30 pm Winter 

NBTS M-461 
Ministry of the Laity 

An exploration of the ministry of the laity in- 
cluding theological and historical perspectives as 
well as contemporary trends in the life of the 
church. Styles of enabling and equipping 
ministry of the laity will be explored. 
Buzzard Th 7-9:30 pm Winter 

BTS M-580 
Pastoral Leadership 

A study of the liturgical and organizational 
responsibilities in pastoral leadership in the free 
church tradition. Enabling the church in its wor- 
ship and witness incorporates a theology of 
leadership, an analysis of ministry roles and ad- 
ministrative practices, development of local and 
trans-local missions, and preparation of such 
corporate services as the wedding, funeral, 
dedication, baptism, communion, and or- 
dination. Denominational and community 
resources are utilized. 
Kennel MW 10:30-12 Spring 

B. PASTORAL CARE AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

NBTS M-391 
Personality and Religion 

The development process of maturation and 
growth is studied from the perspectives of the 
four streams of psychoanalytic; behavioral, 
existential, and social psychology with con- 
tinuous correlation of theological perspectives 



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Ministry Studies: Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction 



on the nature of man. The focus is on growth 
in personhood and in skills in pastoral coun- 
seling. 
Augsburger Tu 1:10-3: 40 Winter 

CTU M-330 

Pastoral Care in the Church 

Basic history, theology, dynamics and 
techniques of pastoral care with emphasis placed 
on the role of the minister in his/her encounter 
with people. Topics to be considered: pastoral 
care in historical and theological perspective; 
the minister's self-image and his/her capacity to 
care; the minister as professing professional; 
basic principles of pastoral care ; special areas of 
pastoral concern during normal development 
and times of crisis. The purpose of this course is 
to introduce the student to the discipline of 
pastoral care and to set a broad founda- 
tion from which the student can move on to 
more specialized courses. 
Mallonee MWF 9-9: 50 Fall 

LSTC M-320A, B, C 
Ministry in Pastoral Care 

A foundational course in pastoral ministry con- 
sisting of correlation of historical and 
theological perspectives for pastoral care, as 
well as contemporary situation-oriented 
workshops. Students are assigned to groups of 
selected parishes for supervised field work. 
Regular consultation between classroom and 
field staff as well as periodic inclusion of field 
work staff in classroom workshops provide for 
an integrated classroom-field approach. 
Swanson or Anderson MW 8-9 : 50 Spring 
Kukkonen M W 11-12 : 50 Spring 

BTS M-380 

Counseling I: Religion and Psychotherapy 

The course will be a study of the contributions 
of psychotherapy to the theological un- 
derstanding of the person. This will include a 
survey of various developmental (personality) 
theories, the description of psychopathology in 
terms of origin, nature, and prognosis, and a 
presentation of a model theory that can be 
useful in pastoral counseling. The course will 
also be a brief introduction to the theory of 
pastoral counseling. 
Royer Th 10:30-1 Fall 

NBTS M-392 

Basic Types in Pastoral Counseling 

Basic principles of therapeutic interaction in the 
pastoral ministry of counseling, utilizing theory, 
case studies, case presentations by students, and 



experiential opportunities for growth. 
Augsburger Tu 1 : 10-3 : 40 



Fall 



MTS M-311 

Empathy Skills in Ministry 

This is a basic course in empathy training — i.e., 
learning to better understand what others are 
trying to communicate to us and letting them 
know that we understand. Various exercises of 
increasing complexity, involve "live" role 
playing, tape recordings, and video tapes. Some 
attention will be given to basic communication 
theory, but the emphasis is on developing 
capacity for empathy. 
Stettner F 9-12 Winter 

MTS M-341 

Dynamics of Family Life 

A review of current developments in family life 
in our culture, reflection on how we understand 
these developments theologically, and im- 
plications for pastoral care including possible 
use by the pastor of such techniques as Parent 
Effectiveness Training, Transactional Analysis, 
Conjoint Family Therapy, etc. 
Stettner Th 11-1 Winter 

CCTS M-335 
Ministry Lab : The Sick 

For course description consult Supervised 

Ministry offerings. 

Stettner/Ashby F 2-4 Fall 

MTS M-336 

Ministry Lab : Troubled Youth 

For course description consult Supervised 

Ministry offerings. 

Stettner F 2-4 Winter 

MTS M-337 

Ministry Lab : Older Persons 

For course description consult Supervised 

Ministry offerings. 

Stettner F 2-4 Spring 

DITM-404(2QH) 
Psychology of Religion 

What are the significant data of religious ex- 
perience? Which data or experiences are of 
religious significance? The course will deal with 
these basic questions, aiming at developing 
habits of attention to significant data and 
categories for the organization of data that will 
facilitate theological reflection on it. 
Schultz TBAn Intensive Winter 




BTS M-480 
Counseling II: 
Counseling 



Introduction to Pastoral 



93 



Ministry Studies: Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction 



The theology of pastoral counseling in relation 
to the various ministries of the church will be 
explored. Counseling will be studied in terms of 
(1) counseling skills, (2) the nature of the coun- 
seling relationship, (3) the ministerial identity, 
and (4) the theological dimensions of coun- 
seling. BTS M-380 or equivalent is a prerequisite. 
Royer Th 3-5:30 Spring 

CTU M-400 

Sources of Pastoral Psychology 

This course is neither an introduction to 
bibliography nor a survey, but an exercise in 
the reading of and working with the principal 
sources of pastoral psychology, as found in 
Freud, Jung, and the originators of the more 
contemporary human potential movement. 
Newbold TTh 9-10:15 Winter 

CTU M-405 

Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

A discussion of the basic types of pastoral coun- 
seling in terms of goals, techniques and 
practices. A presentation and discussion of 
some typical situations in pastoral care. 
Enrollment limited to 15. 

Newbold TTh 9-10:15 Fall 

Mallonee TTh 9-10:15 Winter 

CTU M-406 

Practicum in Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

A prerequisite for this offering is CTU M-405, 
or equivalent. The course is a practicum; with 
emphasis on reality practice roleplay, relative to 
specific types of pastoral counseling situations. 
Follow-up is offered in the form of evaluation 
sessions. Verbatim reports will also be required, 
and evaluation will be given in both individual 
and group sessions. 
Mallonee F 2-4:30 Spring 

CTS CM-415 
Being and Caring 

Theological and psychological implications of 
the experiences of being and caring for personal 
growth and ministry. 
Anderson W 7-10 pm Fall 

DIT M-406 (2 QH) 

Group Process in the Life of the Church 

Intensive experience of group life and group 
process. Participation in group experience: ob- 
servation and reflection upon the process of 
group formation, life and dynamics, with ap- 
plication of group process to doctrine of Church. 
Schultz TBAn Intensive Fall 



NBTS M-492 
Conflict Management 

Exploration of approaches to conflict, conflict 
resolution, and conciliation skills from the per- 
spectives of communication theory, therapeutic 
communication, the dynamics of intra-personal, 
intra-group, intergroup conflict. Prerequisite: 
two courses in pastoral care or one quarter of 
C.P.E. 

Augsburger Th 1 : 10-3 : 40 Fall 

BTS M-489 

Seminar : Marriage Enrichment 
The seminar will study the basic philosophies 
and the presuppositions of Marriage Enrichment. 
The teams will plan the details for and take part 
in one or two weekend Marriage Enrichment 
Workshops in cooperation with the instructor 
and spouse. Students and spouses are expected 
to enroll as teams. Single students will enroll 
with partners of the opposite sex. Meetings of the 
seminar will be on an irregular schedule as 
required for the workshop planning. 
Royer Th 7-9 : 30 pm Spring 

MTS M-416 

Sexual Dynamics in Relation to Pastoral Care 
and Counseling 

For men and women who will be giving and 
receiving pastoral care and counseling. The 
practice of pastoral care and counseling requires 
awareness of and skill in handling the dynamics 
arising from sexuality, sexual identity and 
sexual roles. The course will include, but not be 
limited to, consideration of the effect of the 
social and cultural context on mental health; 
the "double standard" in mental health for 
women and men; dynamics of interaction bet- 
ween men and women in the pastoral care set- 
ting; and pressures for change in the practice of 
pastoral counseling arising from the changing 
role perceptions and expectations for women 
and men in church and society. 
A. Hayes MW 11-1 Spring 

MTS M-406 (half course) 

The Pastor and Community Mental Health 

The purpose of this course is to explore the 
pastor's preventive role in the area of mental 
health. It will deal with basic principles of com- 
munity mental health, identification of mental 
illness, knowledge of community resources, 
techniques of referral, and the functions of a 
congregation as a therapeutic community. There 
will be lectures, discussion, reading and field 
trips. 
Stettner Tu 2-4 Spring 



94 



Ministry Studies: Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction 



CTS CM-438 

The Middle Age Crisis 

An examination of the developmental tasks and 
crises of the middle years of life. Female and 
Male experiences with marriage, vocation, 
family, and life's meaning will be explored. The 
response of the church and ministry to these 
persons will be studied. 
Anderson TBAr Spring 

CTU M-411 
Biblical Spirituality 

This course will explore the different ways 
Scripture deals with questions of spirituality. In 
particular certain key themes will be in- 
vestigated : holiness, grace, sin, death, in Christ, 
Spirit. These will be related to life within the 
community as the locus for spiritual life. 
Isabell MW 3: 30-4: 45 Winter 

CTU M-410 

Ministering to Spiritual Growth 

This course presupposes a rather good 
background in theology. The question ad- 
dressed is: how can a person develop his or her 
relationship with God? After exploring the 
various models of direction theologically and 
historically, the course moves into an ex- 
ploration of spiritual growth and its 
requirements, a consideration of the means 
available to promote it and a practical dealing 
with cases. 
Isabell MW 3: 30-4: 45 Fall 

CTS CM-451 

Gestalt Therapy and Religious Experience 

An exploration and experiencing of Gestalt 
Therapy as one way of understanding con- 
temporary religious experience. 
Anderson W 7-10 pm Winter 

CTS TEC-466 

Psychosynthesis : Dreams, Fantasy, and Religion 

An exploration of a powerful new method of 
psychotherapy and education that utilizes sym- 
bolic visualization, art, meditation, music, 
dreams, fantasy, movement, and a method that 
is particularly congenial to theological and 
religious perspectives. 
Foster M 1-4 Fall 

LSTC M-436 
Guilt and Grace 

A study of the contributions of psychology and 
theology to the understanding of the problem of 
guilt and its resolution. The course is set up in 
such a way as to encourage and facilitate group 
teaching and learning. Enrollment limited to 12; 



admission by approval of instructor. 
Kukkonen MW 1 : 30-2 : 45 



Fall 



LSTC M-491, 492, 493 
Tutorial in Pastoral Counseling 

For course description consult Supervised 

Ministry offerings. 

Swan son/Brooks/OttoTBAr Fa/// Winter/Spring 

MTS M-421, 422, 423, 424 
Clinical Pastoral Education 

For course description consult Supervised 
Ministry offerings. 

Fall/ Winter /Spring/ Summer 

M/L M-408 

Case Studies in Psychology and Religion 

The founders of clinical pastoral education 
urged the centrality of the study of "living 
human documents." Several theorists of per- 
sonality and psychotherapy (e.g., Jung, 
Maslow, Sullivan) give us little or no extended 
case histories as data. Other theorists (Freud, 
family therapists) provide rich cases as evidence 
for their constructs. Several recent schools of 
therapy have made their critique of more 
classical approaches by means of a 
reexamination of the seminal cases of the earlier 
schools. Some claim case studies are empirical 
data; James Hillman, however, speaks of the 
case history as a new form of rhetoric. This 
course will consider the uses of the case study as 
a fundamental learning tool and methodological 
approach in psychotherapy and pastoral coun- 
seling. Issues to be addressed include the role of 
diagnosis, the nature of empiricism, the place of 
the idiographic approach in social science and 
theology, and the hermeneutical problem. The 
course will consider a different case each week, 
including cases taken from Freud (Dora, Little 
Hans, Anna O.), M. Schatzman (Schreber), 
Erikson (Luther), Laing (the Danzigs), Russell 
Dicks, Richard Cabot, and H. Nouwen. 
Schneider TBAr Fall 

CCTS M-501 

Symposium in Psychology and Religion 

This course will focus on some person, topic, or 
issue of current interest in the broad field of 
psychology and religion, and will be different 
each time it is offered. Instructors from Cluster 
schools, experts on pertinent subjects, or 
representatives of other religious groups may be 
involved. The particular focus for the course 
will be announced at least one quarter in ad- 
vance. There are no specific prerequisites for 
the course, but it is assumed that students will 




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Ministry Studies: Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction 



have had other courses in the field. 
Stettner/Cluster Pastoral Care Faculty 
W2-4 



Spring 



BTS M-582 

Introduction to Group Counseling and Therapy 

Attention will be given through the structure of 
the seminar to the theory of group counseling 
and therapy and the implication for ministry. 
Each student will serve as counselor to a group 
at least twice. Each student will also select a 
theme relevant to the subject and present a 
paper to the seminar on that theme. BTS M-480 
or equivalent is a prerequisite. 
Royer F 1-3:30 Fall 

LSTC M-520 

Group Dynamics and Group Therapy 

Emphasis upon the learning and therapeutic ex- 
periences amidst the dynamic interactions and 
interpersonal relations of an ongoing group 
situation. Psychological and theological reflec- 
tion as well as a consideration of com- 
munication theory. Requirements include out- 
side reading and final evaluation. Prerequisite: 
LSTC M-320 or equivalent. 
Swanson MW8-8:50 Fall 

LSTC M-521 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

A course aimed at the preparation of the pastor 
for his or her predominant type of counseling. 
Attention will be directed to theories and prac- 
tices in present-day conjoint and family 
therapies. Some consideration will be given to 
pre-marital education, divorce, sexuality, and 
the sociology of marriage. Limited enrollment; 
admission by approval of instructor. 
Prerequisite: LSTC M-320 or equivalent. 
Swanson MW8-9:50 Winter 

NBTS M-591 

Marital and Family Therapy 

Theory and therapy of the marital dyad, the 
family triangles of conflict, and the family as a 
system. Conjoint Therapy and General Systems 
theory provide the working base for both study 
and experiential practice from the pastoral per- 
spective. Prerequisites: Personality and 
Religions and Basic Types in Pastoral Coun- 
seling or equivalent. 

Augsburger Section 1 : Tu 1 : 10-3 : 40 Spring 
Augsburger Section 2: Th 1:10-3:40 Spring 

CTU M-508 

Existential Psychotherapy and Pastoral Practice 

This course examines the important influence 
that existential philosophy has come to have 



upon the development of psychotherapy. Em- 
phasis will be placed upon the contributions to 
psychotherapy made by the existential analysis 
and interpretation of individual experience in a 
crisis society. The authors studied will be: Paul 
Tillich, Ludwig Binswanger, Medard Boss, 
Thomas Hora, F. J. J. Buytendijik, Rollo May 
and Eugene Kahn. 
Newbold W 7-9:30 pm Winter 

NBTS M-592 

Existential Pastoral Psychotherapy 

An advanced course in pastoral counseling 
specializing in existential approaches to 
psychotherapy with a primary focus on Gestalt 
theory and practice. The course will be evenly 
divided between didactic and experiential ap- 
proaches. Limited to 12 advanced students with 
prerequisites of Personality and Religion and 
Conflict Management or equivalent. Admission 
by approval of instructor. 
Augsburger Th 1:10-3:40 Winter 

DITM-548(2QH) 
Spiritual Direction 

A study of the purpose and object of spiritual 
direction; varying models of spirituality; 
discerning the patterns of spirituality in self and 
others; methods of spiritual direction. 
Hartenbach TBAr Spring 

JSTC M-594 

Dynamics of the Spiritual Exercises 

This lecture, reading and discussion course will 
focus on the theological and psychological 
dynamics of the Spiritual Exercises of St. 
Ignatius Loyola. Seen as a radical gospel or con- 
version experience, the Spiritual Exercises will 
be considered as an articulation of Ignatius' con- 
version experience and in the light of present 
psycho-theological understanding of con- 
version. Prerequisites: a personal familiarity 
with the Spiritual Exercises either through the 
experience of directed retreats or through per- 
sonal study of them. Requirements: par- 
ticipation in class discussion and a paper. 
Robb Th 2-4:45 Winter 

BTS M-581 

Seminar in Advanced Pastoral Counseling 

The student will be asked to maintain a coun- 
seling relationship throughout the quarter, 
giving periodic "case reports" to the seminar . 
These will be explored in terms of (1) the 
development of the counselee's problem 
situation, (2) the dynamics of the counselor's 
personhood in terms of helpfulness or in- 



96 



Ministry Studies: Liturgy and Worship 



terference in the conselee's growth, and (3) the 
nature of the counseling relationship, 
psychologically and theologically. There will be 
a special emphasis for the year. BTS M-480 or 
equivalent is a prerequisite. 
Royer Th 12:30-3 Winter 

CTU M-505 

Advanced Practicum in Pastoral Counseling 

For course description consult Supervised 
Ministry offerings. 

TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

MTS M-604 

Pastoral Care and Alcoholism 

The course is designed to acquaint pastors with 
the cultural context and prevailing patterns of 
drug use, the phenomenon of addiction as an 
illness, and resources and methods for helping 
addicts with special reference to the spiritual 
and theological dimensions of addictive 
illnesses and recovery. 
F.Hayes June 13-17, TBAn Summer 1977 

MTS M-633 

Preparing Congregations for More Effective 

Ministry in Family Crisis 

This course provides a theological, theoretical 
and practical approach to the way in which 
pastors may equip members to minister to other 
members during family crisis. The course is 
designed to use current experiences of pastors as 
the basis for course learning. 
Sanchez Apr. 10-14, TBAn Spring 

CCTS M-602A 

Pastoral Care: History and Theology 

This quarter will focus on the development of a 
professional understanding of pastoral theology. 
The history of pastoral care in the church will 
be considered, as well as the place of pastoral 
care in the church today and issues concerning 
pastoral identity. The relationship between 
theological disciplines and psychological 
disciplines will also be dealt with. There will be 
assigned reading, lectures, and seminar 
discussion. 
Stettner/Newbold F 9-12 Fall 

CCTS M-602B 

Pastoral Care: Personality Theories and 

Therapies 

Consideration of different theories of per- 
sonality and their implications for counseling 
and therapy. We will seek to develop a critical 
understanding of the emphases and an- 
thropologies represented by the various schools, 
together with their respective philosophical 



presuppositions and theological correlations, 
and endeavor to understand their relevance for 
counseling and pastoral care. Case studies will 
be used. 
Swanson/Schneider F 9-12 Winter 

CCTS M-602C 

Pastoral Care and the Christian Community 

An exploration of the nature of community and 
its healing power with reference to theological, 
biblical, psychological and therapeutic theories 
and practice. An experience of the house church 
process will allow members to participate in a 
learning-transforming community and to ex- 
plore Christian community as a vehicle for the 
mutual care of souls. Each student will be asked 
to formulate his or her own basic change 
theory — conditions, processes, goals and out- 
comes. 
Anderson/Royer F 9-12 Spring 

C. LITURGY AND WORSHIP 

CTU T-350 

Basic Principles of Catholic Worship 

For course description consult Theological 
Studies offerings. 

Keifer MW2-3:15 Fall 

Keifer MWF 10-10:50 Spring 

DITM-332(2QH) 
Introduction to Liturgical Studies 

An introduction to the major themes of 
liturgical study, including a bibliographical sur- 
vey of the pertinent materials. Areas included 
are: Cult, Rite, and Man; Symbol, Word and 
Language; the economy of our sacramental 
system of symbols; the Paschal Mystery; 
liturgical law, the Spirit and the letter; sacred 
time and space; festivity. 
Kennedy Th 9:10-11 Fall 

JSTC M-326 

Liturgy Practicum : Eucharist and Homiletics 

Intended for those who are approaching or- 
dination to the priesthood. It encompasses the 
art of presiding at the Eucharist and leading 
community celebration. Homiletics is handled 
as an organic part of this presidential style. 
Workshop activities are coupled with critical 
appraisal and peer evaluation. Limited 
enrollment. 
TBAn TBAn TBAn 

JSTC M-328 

Practicum in Liturgical* Planning 

Engages the participants in planning and 
executing parochial liturgies with appropriate 




97 



Ministry Studies: Liturgy and Worship 



supervision. Evaluative procedures include 
video-taping actual celebrations and in- 
terviewing those who participate in the liturgies. 
Operative theories in the art of celebration 
emerge for critical appraisal in the course of the 
practicum. Limited to six students. 
TBAn TBAn TBAn 

LSTC M-365 

Baptism and First Communion 

A study of the biblical, historical and doctrinal 
aspects of this ministry and its development in 
the church today. Particular emphasis will be 
placed on in-depth study of curriculum, 
teaching methods and programs for baptism, 
first communion and confirmation. 
Bozeman TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

LSTC M-380 
Ministry in Worship 

This course traces the historical development of 
liturgy within the Judeo-Christian tradition, 
thereby enabling the student to have a sense of 
the continuity of liturgical history. It further 
assists the student in the development of a 
theology of worship which will enable him to 
determine the validity of liturgy as a faithful ex- 
pression of the church catholic. 
TBAn TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

MTS M-314 

Introducing Worship With Preaching I 

An introduction of the fundamentals of cor- 
porate Christian worship as the backdrop against 
which the student develops two sermons in 
process throughout the quarter. The student 
moves from text to outlined sermon while 
examining accompanying critical theological 
issues regarding the nature of preaching. 
Wardlaw TuF 2-4 Fall 

MTS M-315 

Introducing Worship with Preaching II 

The student preaches before peers and lay 
people the sermons developed in introductory 
course I. Prior to the preaching moments, the 
student works before video cameras in a series 
of exercises designed to help him/her internalize 
and re-present the word-event inherent in the 
text. The student will also be video taped in the 
act of preaching to point out strengths and to 
build confidence in communication. Other work 
in the course includes lectures on the Christian 
Year, worship and missions, the Sacraments, 
weddings and funerals, plus the design of two 
worship services. Prerequisite: MTS M-314 or 
equivalent. 
Wardlaw M 2-4, Tu 6-8 pm Winter 



MTS M-318 (half course) 

The Worshipping Congregation 

Using the case-study approach, the course ex- 
plores the directory for worship of the Book of 
Order of the UPCUSA. The study includes im- 
plications for the design and leadership of cor- 
porate Christian worship. 

Wardlaw lst-4th weeks W 1-5 Fall 

5th-10th weeks MTW 7-10 pm 

NBTS M-372 
Worship in the Church 

This course is concerned with various aspects of 
worship in the church, from the theology of 
worship to the effective conduct of services. 
Consideration is given to traditional, liturgical, 
and free-church forms, and to contemporary 
patterns of worship. Special attention is given to 
baptism and the Lord's Supper, and to weddings 
and funerals. 

Enright Th 10 : 30-11 : 20 Winter 

plus one 2-hour lab 

NBTS M-374 (1 QH each quarter) 

Introduction to Church Music 

The purpose of this course is to show the many 

ways in which the rich musical heritage of the 

church supports and expresses the faith of the 

church. Practical exposure and experience is a 

part of the course. 

Eckert Th 9:30-10:20 Fall 

Eckert Th 8:30-9:20 Winter 

Eckert Th 8:30-9:20 Spring 

JSTC M-327 

Liturgy Practicum: Sacraments 

Designed for those students who are ap- 
proaching ordination to the priesthood or those 
who will be engaged in parochial work in 
various capacities. Encompasses the art of 
preparing and leading community celebrations 
of the sacraments other than the Eucharist as 
well as various forms of community prayer and 
paraliturgical services. Limited enrollment. 
TBAn TBAn TBAn 

MTS M-447 

Arts and the Dynamics of Worship 

An examination of the relationship of the arts to 
worship. The course will include readings in 
theology of culture, philosophy of art, and con- 
temporary liturgy. But it will also involve 
viewings, listenings, and practical experience. 
Reference to early Christian, medieval, and 
modern arts — secular as well as religious. 
Brown TTh 11-1 Fall 



98 



Ministry Studies: Liturgy and Worship 



BTS M-471 

Preaching and Worship 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 
Preaching and Communication offerings. 
Kennel MWF 11 : 30-12 : 20 Winter 

CTU 1-450 (1 or 2 full courses) 
Eucharist /Preaching /Celebration 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 

Integrative Studies offerings. 

Baumer/Keifer MWF 10-11: 50 Winter 

DIT M-445 (1 QH) 

Public Prayer in the Christian Tradition: The 

Liturgy of the Hours 

The historical development of Christian daily 
prayer from its Jewish roots through the 1971 
General Instruction on the Liturgy of the Hours 
with practical consideration given to leading 
the Hours. 
Kennedy F 8:10-9 Winter 

DIT M-446 (2 QH) 

Practicum in Presidential Style of Celebration 

Readings in and supervised practice of the 
celebration of the Church's liturgy, particularly 
Eucharist and the sacrament of Reconciliation, 
in preparation for ordination to the priesthood. 
Videotape used. 
Kennedy TBAr Spring 

CCTS 1-540 (2 or 3 full courses) 
Celebration : Intensive Unit I 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 

Integrative Studies offerings. 

Brown /Sittler/Wardlaw Th 9-4 Spring 

CCTST-518 

Seminar on Black Worship and Liturgical 

Tradition 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Keifer /Wright Th2-4:30 Winter 

BTS M-574 

Music in the Life of the Church 

A study of hymnody with special emphasis on 

the function of music in the life of the local 

congregation. 

Faus Th 3-5:30 Fall 

CTU M-517 

Ministry of Reconciliation 

This is an interdisciplinary offering integrating 
the theological, moral, canonical, liturgical and 
interpersonal dimensions of the ministry of 
Reconciliation. It is designed to help the student 
move toward competency as minister of Recon- 
ciliation. The structure of the course includes 



lectures, readings and practicum. The course is 
open to 3rd and 4th year students. 
Bonner/Mallonee/ F 2-4: 30 Winter 

MacDonald/Newbold 

CTU M-518 
Liturgy Practicum 

This seminar and series of lab sessions (not held 
during class time) will help the candidate for or- 
dination to the priesthood develop a celebration 
style for sacramental worship, especially 
Eucharist. 
Staff Th 2-4:30 Spring 

DIT M-502 (2 QH) 
Liturgical Time and Space 

The development of the Church's Year; and 
Liturgical art and architecture. Sacred time, the 
Christian Pascha, the Christmas-Epiphany 
cycle, cult of martyrs. Expression of sacred 
space in architecture and how it reveals an ec- 
clesiology. Offered in response to student in- 
terest. 
Kennedy TBAr Spring 

DIT M-535 (2 QH) 

Ritual and Sacramental Symbolism 

Human ritualization from the following points 
of view: anthropology, psychology, sociology, 
philosophy, theology. How and what we 
humans symbolize, and how Christians ritualize 
through a sacramental system. 
Kennedy TBAr Winter 

DIT M-590 (2 or 3 QH) 
Directed Research 

Topics determined in response to student in- 
terest. Enrollment is limited to De Andreis 
students. 
Kennedy TBAr TBAr 

MTS M-614 

Revitalizing Worship in Your Congregation 

To study a model of the meaning of the wor- 
ship moment from theological, historical and 
pastoral perspectives, as prelude to considering 
the process of revitalizing worship in your 
congregation. The agenda includes an in- 
troduction of the Sacraments, relationship be- 
tween vital creativity and tradition, the place of 
children in the sanctuary, the formation of 
liturgical teams of laypeople. Course projects: 
the design of a course in worship for your 
congregation; the blueprint for a two-year 
strategy for revitalizing worship in your 
congregation. 
Wardlaw Feb 20-24, TBA Winter 




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Ministry Studies : Preaching and 

MTS M-615 

Sacraments, Worship and Lifestyles 

This seminar is designed to explore fundamental 
theological questions about the meaning of the 
sacraments, their relation to worship and their 
potential significance when seen in connection 
with the great human issues of our time. The 
Seminar will look at some of the ways by which 
sacramental life might be an element in creating 
new life-styles, especially for families in the 
church. (For example, the Seminar will raise the 
issue as to whether or not the Church's response 
to the hunger problem should have any con- 
nection with its understanding and practice of 
Holy Communion; and further, whether fasting 
(and feasting!) should have theological, as well 
as political meaning in our life-styles.) 
Rigdon Jan. 2-6, TBAn Winter 

D. PREACHING AND COMMUNICATION 

BTS M-371 

Ministry and Communication 

A study of communication as interpersonal and 
intentional interaction with accent upon at- 
titudes of communication as ministry /ministry 
as communication, as well as the com- 
municator's own charisma. Principles and prac- 
tices of effective communication are applied in 
the various situations of ministry. This ex- 
perience consists of three hours in class and one 
hour in supervised laboratory work with the use 
of audio- video equipment. 
Kennel M WF 1 1 : 30-12 : 20 Fall 

DIT M-313 (1 QH) 
Basics of Communication 

Review of the general principles and practices of 
communication. Units: The Nature of the Com- 
munication Process; Voice Production; 
Voice — Melody, Time, Force; Bodily Actions; 
Audience Analysis. Special emphasis is placed 
on the reading aloud of liturgical texts and com- 
mentaries. In addition to the regular class 
periods each student will have five one-half 
hour individual instruction periods with the 
professor. 
Miller Th 1-1:50 Winter 

DIT M-314 (1 QH) 

Communication in the Christian Assembly 

This course aims at strengthening the foun- 
dations upon which the seminarian can build his 
effective communication of the Word of God, 
conceived in the broad aspects of all the 
situations in which he will be responsible for the 



Communication 

Word of God. Units: Oral Interpretation of the 
Word of God; Various Speeches, Interviews, 
Discussion, Drama; Radio, Television, Films; 
Teaching in General, and Religion Teaching in 
Particular; Retreats, Workshops, Institutes. In 
addition to the regular class periods each 
student will have five one-half hour individual 
instruction periods with the professor. 
Miller Th 1-1:50 Spring 

DIT M-323 (1 QH) 
Ministry of Preaching 

The course deals with the theory and practice 
of composing a sermon and delivering it, with 
stress on written and oral composition. Units: 
Steps in Sermon Composition; Principles of 
Relevancy, Interest, and Support; the Selection 
and Use of Materials; Outlines; and In- 
troduction and Conclusion. In addition to the 
regular class periods each student will have five 
one-half hour individual instruction periods 
with the professor. 
Miller Tu 9: 10-10 Winter 

DIT M-324 (1 QH) 
Preaching the Homily 

The nature of the homily is discussed. Methods 
of fulfilling the homiletic requirement are ex- 
plained and practiced. Units: the Nature of the 
Homily; a Format for the Homily; Variety in 
the Style of the Homily; Total Environment of 
the Homily; Presentation to Lay Critics. In ad- 
dition to the regular class periods each student 
will have five one-half hour individual practice 
periods with the professor. 
Miller Th 9:10-10 Spring 

JSTC M-326 

Liturgy Practicum : Eucharist and Homiletics 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 

Liturgy and Worship offerings. 

TBAn TBAn TBAn 

JSTC M-329 

Liturgy Practicum: Sacrament of Reconciliation 

This practicum focuses on the Sacrament of 
Reconciliation in both its individual and com- 
munal settings. Weekly classes treat the 
sacrament from various perspectives including 
the liturgical, canonical, psychological and 
moral. Workshop groups are formed and meet 
weekly with the assistance of various members 
of the staff for role-play and discussion. 
TBAn TBAn TBAn 

LSTC M-340 
Ministry in Preaching 

The purpose of this course is to help the begin- 






100 



Ministry Studies: Preaching and Communication 



ner to understand the nature of preaching and 
to establish sound practice in the first essentials 
of sermon production; to evaluate the message, 
achieve unity, plan the strategy, develop the 
ideas, use language. The end in view is to unite 
practice with critical judgement. Format of 
course includes lectures, readings and 
discussion, writing and preaching sermons. 
Niedenthal/Kildegaard TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 

MTS M-314 

Introducing Worship with Preaching I 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 

Liturgy and Worship offerings. 

Wardlaw TuF 2-4 Fall 

MTS M-315 

Introducing Worship with Preaching II 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 

Liturgy and Worship offerings. 

Wardlaw M 2-4, Tu 6-8 pm Winter 

NBTS M-373 

Principles and Practice of Preaching I 

This course combines consideration of the 
theology of preaching and the nature of biblical 
preaching with the actual preparation and 
delivery of sermons. Students' manuscript ser- 
mons and preached sermons are evaluated by 
the class. Sermons delivered in class are video- 
taped to help students improve their own 
preaching. Prerequisite: Worship in the Church 
or equivalent. 

Buzzard/Enright Th 10:30-11:20 Spring 
plus one 2-hour lab 

BTS M-471 

Preaching and Worship 

A laboratory course combining preaching and 
worship in a unified consideration. Emphasis is 
given to the study of classical and contemporary 
principles and methods of preparation and 
delivering sermons that speak to pastoral, 
prophetic and pedagogical needs; a search is 
made for forms and styles for the free church as 
it celebrates the presence and power of God as 
experienced in the life of the community. Actual 
services that integrate theology, phenomenology 
and contemporary media are prepared and 
presented; audio and video tapes are used for 
evaluation purposes and group analysis. BTS 
M-371 or equivalent is a prerequisite. 
Kennel MWF 11 : 30-12 : 20 Winter 

CTU 1-450 (1 or 2 full courses) 
Eucharist /Preaching/Celebration 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 

Integrative Studies offerings. 

Baumer/Keifer MWF 10-11: 50 Winter 



CTU M^50A, B 

Preaching as Verbal Communication 

This is a first course for those who are to 
preach. The seminar and practicum will help 
each student discover his/her own com- 
munication skills in the oral reading and 
preaching of the Word of God. These skills are 
then put into practice by a process of ex- 
perimentation and exercise. Since each student 
enters the seminar at a different level of com- 
petence and experience, this first course en- 
courages a variety of preaching styles. Each 
student has the opportunity to use video-tape 
and preach before outside groups. Limited 
enrollment (5 per section). 

Baumer A MW2-3:15 Fall 

Baumer B M 2-3:15; W 3:30-4:45 Fall 

Baumer A TTh 12-1:15 Winter 

Baumer B T 12-1 : 15 ; Th 1 : 30-2 : 45 Winter 
Baumer A MW2-3:15 Spring 

Baumer B M 2-3:15; W 3:30-4:45 Spring 

CTU B-495 

Bible Exegeted and Preached: Prophecy 

For course description consult Old Testament 

offerings. 

Baumer/Stuhlmueller TTh 12-1:15 Fall 

MTS M-419 

From Text to Sermon 

An exegesis course with emphasis on preaching. 
Review of the text will help the student in 
preparation and preaching in the context of an 
Hispanic congregation. Text for 1977-78 to be 
selected. The course will be offered in Spanish 
and English. If all students are Spanish speaking, 
the course will be taught in Spanish. 
Armendariz F 2-5 Winter 

LSTC M-452 
Christianity and Tragedy 

A seminar which probes the relationship bet- 
ween a tragic sense and vision of life and a 
Christian one, and the bearing of this relation- 
ship of theological understanding and Christian 
proclamation. Basic readings are dramatic 
works of tragedy and selected sermons of Paul 
Tillich. Limited enrollment; admission by ap- 
proval of instructor. 
Niedenthal Th 2-4:30 Fall 

MTS M-441 

The Theology and Practice of Preaching Grace 

How as preachers of grace do we hold in 
creative tension both what God in Christ has 
done for us and what He demands of us, 
without preaching either cheap grace or works of 
righteousness? We begin the study of this cen- 




101 



Ministry Studies: Preaching and Communication 



tral theological problem in preaching by 
examining the relation between God's succor 
(indicative) and God's demand (imperative) in 
the New Testament. The study then broadens to 
investigate the indicative/imperative relation- 
ship in the thinking of Barth, Brunner, Bult- 
mann, Bonhoeffer, Tillich, Moltmann, H.R. 
Niebuhr, Lehmann and Fletcher. The class 
examines both its own sermons as well as 
"known" American preachers' sermons in light 
of the above study. 
Wardlaw MW 11-1 Fall 

CCTS M-473 

Mass Media and the Liberation Message 

An analysis of contemporary media's power to 
transmit and inform, to influence and motivate 
values. The church's theology of human 
liberation will be employed to evaluate such 
media as film, television, radio, print and ad- 
vertising and their impact upon the church's 
theology of human liberation, including such 
areas as racial and women's issues and 
stereotypes. Course approaches include 
seminars, film screenings (such as Bunuel's "Vir- 
diana"), attendance at Chicago's Midwest Film 
Conference and selected projects and produc- 
tions. 
Kennel /Spivey Th3:30-6 Winter 

NBTSM-474 

Audio Visual Communications 

A study of the production and utilization of 
audio visual resources in the context of the 
church and Christian communications with an 
emphasis on laboratory experience. 
Clark M 7-9:30 pm Spring 

DIT M-434 (1 QH) 
Practicum II for Theology III 

Presentation of homilies to selected lay critics 
invited to the seminary. The presentation is 
followed by a discussion in which the homily 
and the homilist are evaluated. 
Miller Th 10:10-11 Spring 

DITM-443UQH) 
Practicum III for Theology IV 

Evaluation by the professor and peers of the 
preaching by the theologian in the fulfillment of 
his assigned ministry. 
Miller M 8:10-9 Winter 

NBTS M-473 (1QH) 
Preaching Lab 

This course provides a special opportunity to in- 
tegrate into preaching continued learnings of 
classroom and ministry. Practicum, restricted to 



Senior students and qualified Middlers. The 

larger activity of this course is preaching, and its 

analysis. 

Enright Th 9:30-10:20 Fall 

CCTS 1-570 (2 full courses) 

Interpretation and Communication: Preaching: 

Intensive Unit 1 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 
Integrative Studies offerings. 
Brauch/Fischer/Kennel Th 3-9 pm Spring 

LSTC M-540 

Language of Preaching: Shared Story 

A seminar to investigate the language, form and 
theological implications of story. Readings will 
include stories of the rabbis, short stories and 
selected sermons. Students will compose and 
share stories dealing with selected experience 
and theological themes. Limited enrollment: ad- 
mission by approval of instructor. Prerequisite: 
LSTC M-360 or equivalent. 
Niedenthal TTh 12:30-1 : 45 Fall 

LSTC M-541 

Preaching the Christian Gospel Today 

This course aims to explore the problems and 
possibilities in speaking and doing good news 
today in light of concrete issues and situations. 
The content, grammar and language of gospel 
will be discussed. Students will be asked to help 
describe issues and situations, and then present 
papers which show how gospel can be spoken in 
this concrete context. Limited enrollment; ad- 
mission by approval of instructor. Prerequisite: 
LSTC M-340 or equivalent. 
Niedenthal MW 3-4:15 Spring 

DITM-533(1QH) 
Practicum I for Theology III 

A discussion type investigation of "Next Sun- 
day's Homily." Interpretations of the readings 
are offered and evaluated. Development of the 
theme is suggested. Applications to the Mass 
and daily life are essayed. 
Miller TBAr Fall 

DITM-544(1 QH) 
Practicum IV for Theology IV 

Practice in the administration of the sacraments 
and the celebration of the Mass. Evaluation is 
made by way of video-taping. 
Miller TBAr Fall 

DIT M-545 (1 QH) 
Communication Aids 

The use of audio-visuals and multi-media in the 
communication process, especially during the 



102 



Ministry Studies: Religious Education 



Liturgy. Includes the use of film, filmstrip, slide, 
poster, banner, lighting, music, sound effects. 
Offered in response to student interest. 
Miller TBAr TBAr 

DIT M-546 (1 QH) 
Oral Interpretation 

An intensive course in the oral communication 
of the printed word, especially as found in the 
Lectionary, Sacramentary, and other Liturgical 
and non-Liturgical books. Offered in response 
to student interest. 
Miller TBAr TBAr 

DIT M-547 (1 QH) 
Communication Leadership 

An intensification of Communication in the 
Christian Assembly. The following elements in 
communication would be discussed: Leadership 
in Discussion, Audience Response, Modes of 
Persuasion, Facilitating Study Groups, Directing 
Parish Liturgy Committees. Offered in response 
to student interest. 
Miller TBAr TBAr 

MTS B-607 

Preaching from the Old Testament 

For course description consult Old Testament 

offerings. 

Boling July 11-15, TBAn Summer 1977 

MTS M-613 

Theological Perspectives on Preaching 

The aim of the course is the development of 
more effective preaching through: a) 
clarification of the various purposes and types 
of sermons; b) preparation, delivery and critical 
listening; c) theological reflection upon the ser- 
monic process. 
Burkhart Oct. 10-14, TBAn Fall 



E. RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

LSTC M-360 

Ministry in Religious Education 

This basic course in Religious Education, offered 
through the Teaching Parish, is intended to ex- 
pose the student to philosophies, theology, 
curriculum, methodologies and possibilities in 
the overall area of parish education. On the basis 
of these exposures and individual past ex- 
periences, the student will be expected to engage 
in experiences to give actual practice in the field 
plus steps to formulate his/her own 
philosophies and creativity. 
Pero/Priester TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 



MTS M-313 

The Teaching Ministry of the Church 

A study of the teaching ministry of the church 
with attention to historical perspectives, edu- 
cational theory, patterns of objectives, ad- 
ministrative procedures, and styles of teaching 
with the variety of age groups and situations. 
Priester MW 11-1 Winter 

NBTS M-381 

Teaching Ministry of the Church 

The course aims to develop an understanding of 
the biblical, theological, psychological, 
philosophical and socio-cul rural foundations for 
the educational ministry of the church. 
Jenkins MWF 11 :30-12:20 Winter 

BTS M-399 

The Development of Conscience 

A consideration of the biblical doctrine of con- 
science in comparison with various con- 
temporary views of the development of moral 
judgement, especially those of Piaget, Erikson 
and Freud. The course focuses upon the stages 
of moral development and pathology as well as 
the implications of such development for the 
educational and pastoral care programs of the 
church. 
Miller MWF 2: 10-3 Spring 

M/L M-396 

Religious Education and Development 

Religious education as a general field with em- 
phasis on child development, moral and faith 
development. An examination of the philosophy 
of Unitarian Universalist religious education; an 
overview and critique of UU curricula. 
Adams TBAr Spring 

NBTS M-384 

Group Process in the Church 

A study of research in group process and sen- 
sitivity training is utilized to understand in- 
terpersonal relationships and effective small 
group leadership. The class becomes a training 
group for understanding the group process. 
Limited enrollment. 
Jenkins Th 7-9:30 pm Fall 

NBTS M-382 

Administration and Organization of Christian 

Education 

A study of management theory and its ap- 
plication to church organization and educational 
ministry. The course includes observation and 
evaluation of church educational programs. 
Jenkins MWF 1:10-2 Spring 




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Ministry Studies: Religious Education 



NBTS M-383 

Teaching Methods and Practice 

The student will be assisted in developing a 
teaching style based on: (1) a theory of lear- 
ning, (2) behavioral objectives, (3) designing 
teaching-learning experiences, and (4) 
evaluation of educational outcomes. The 
student's performance is evaluated by group 
process. An additional 2 hours of practice 
teaching per quarter integrates the application 
of theory . 
Jenkins MWF2:10-3 Fall 

BTS M-490 

Curriculum of Christian Education 

A consideration of the elements of a systematic 
approach to education in the congregation. 
There will be examination and evaluation of 
resources currently used in congregations and 
those projected for the future. 
Heckman W 3-5:30 Spring 

MTS M-410 

Resources for Church Education 

Comparative studies of materials for use in the 

development of teaching in the church. 

Priester MW 4-6 Spring 

MTS M-404 

The Teaching Ministry with Children 

Studies in alternative ways to minister with 

children in the church. Attention will be given 

to programs of teaching, factors of growth and 

development, peer relationships, family and 

school. 

Priester Tu 7-10 pm Fall 

NBTS M-483 

Teaching Children in the Church 

This course is a combination of educational 
theory and practice in teaching children. An un- 
derstanding of the development and growth of 
children is integrated into a teaching style and 
methodology appropriate to communicating 
faith to young children. Observation, 
evaluation and practice teaching are included in 
the design. ABC curricula and that of other 
denominations are utilized. Prerequisite: 
Teaching Ministry of the Church or equivalent. 
Staff Tu 7-9 :30 pm Spring 

MTS M-418 (half course) 
Confirmation and Church Education 

Attention will be given to theological un- 
derstandings and ecclesiastical practices in con- 
firmation as well as teaching programs leading 
to confirmation. 
Priester Tu 4-6 Fall 



MTS M-405 

The Church's Ministry with Youth 

The bulk of the course will be workshops 
focusing on media, process designs, value 
clarification tools, role plays, improvisations, 
resources, games, liturgical dance, and worship 
skills. Overviews and models will be presented 
for a ministry with youth. Youth will be present 
as enablers. Philosophy and practical im- 
plementation will be central to the course. 
Myers W 1 : 30-4 : 30 Spring 

NBTS M-482 
Ministry with Youth 

A study of adolescent psychology with an em- 
phasis on the religious development of youth; 
and evaluation of styles of youth ministry, 
resources and youth culture. A field experience 
in a retreat setting with youth will seek to 
develop program planning and communication 
skills. Prerequisite: Teaching Ministry of the 
Church or equivalent. 
Jenkins Tu 7-9:30 pm Winter 

LSTC M-461 

Pedagogy of Parish Renewal 

A course dealing with the challenge of teaching 
adults in the local congregation. The primary 
aim will be to provide a model and practice for 
developing an approach to theological 
education for lay adults. Concerns will include 
clarifying one's own working theology; finding 
imaginative modes of conveying that theology; 
practical methods for group study of modern 
theology. 
Benne MW 3-4:15 Winter 

MTS M-408 

Teaching Church History in the Congregation 

A canvass of appropriate historical materials 
and a study of various ways in which they may 
be used to instruct and confirm Christians in 
their faith. Each student will undertake a 
teaching project in a congregation or similar 
church group. 
Priester /Schafer TTh 11-1 Winter 

LSTC M-467 

Global Consciousness and Religious Education 

A careful study and evaluation of a pedagogical 
process by which a person or a people gain a 
new awareness of their own reality, the forces 
which objectify and oppress them within that 
reality, and the potentiality for becoming the 
subjects of their own liberation (redemption) as 
well as becoming the agents of change for 
religious education. 
Per o M W 1 : 30-2 : 45 Winter 



104 



Ministry Studies: Organization and Administration 



CTU W-563 

Religious Education in Cross-Cultural 

Perspective 

For course description consult World Mission 

Studies offerings. 

Barbour W 7-9:30 pm Winter 

LSTC M-560 

Three Facets of Educational Ministry 

This course will deal with (a) functions of the 
congregation and education ministry, (b) youth 
ministry, and (c) leadership training. The em- 
phasis will be on theory, models and resources 
for each area. Prerequisite: LSTC M-360 or 
equivalent. 
Bozeman MW 1:30-2:45 Spring 

NBTS M-581 

Research Seminar in Christian Education 

Advanced students may design an independent 
course of study. The seminar will convene 
during the winter quarter to design research 
projects and to initiate preparation for the 
special field examination. During the spring 
quarter the seminar will meet to discuss research 
and project reports. 
Jenkins M 3:10-5:40 Winter/Spring 

DIT M 504, 505, 506 (2 QH each quarter) 
The Ministry of Education 

For course description consult Supervised 

Ministry offerings. 

Kennedy W 10:10-11 Fall/Winter/ Spring 

MTS M-606 

Contemporary Models of Teaching 

Goals of the Course: 1) to examine assumptions 

about the learner, learning, and what is to be 

learned, 2) to reflect upon types of teaching 

events in the church, 3) to suggest a variety of 

teaching models with an appropriate set of 

assumptions, technologies, and processes. 

Priester Mar. 13-17, TBAn Winter 



F. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

CTSCH-367(1 I / 2 QH) 

History and Polity of the United Church of 

Christ 

A study of the history, structure, theology and 
practices of the United Church of Christ, in- 
cluding its antecedents: the Congregational 
Christian Churches and the Evangelical and 
Reformed Church. 
Rooks M 3:30-5 Spring 



MTS M-317 (half course) 

Polity, Politics and Presbyterianism 

An introduction to Presbyterian polity, in- 
cluding preparation for the Standard Ordination 
Examinations. Includes a study of the historical, 
theological and political basis for the rules and 
procedures by which the church does its work. 
Contemporary trends^ in the development of 
polity will be included. 
Worley M 1-5 Fall (First Half of Quarter) 

NBTS M-382 

Administration and Organization of Christian 

Education 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 

Religious Education offerings. 

Jenkins MWF 1 : 10-2 Spring 

LSTC 1-410 

Senior Seminar on Church Administration 

For course description consult Interdisciplinary/ 

Integrative Studies Offerings. 

Kildegaard TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

W 7-10 pm 
MTS M-414 

Congregational Administration 
An introduction to the dynamic behavior of 
congregations with emphasis on theology con- 
cepts, skills, and tools needed for effective 
management. 
Worley F 9-12 Spring 

MTS M-440 (half course) 

Practicum in General Assembly UPCUSA 

After background study of reports, assembly 
procedure, and leadership positions, the class 
will attend the six-day meeting of the General 
Assembly. As observers, students will par- 
ticipate in committee meetings, floor debates 
and informal gatherings. In a daily seminar 
students will talk with church leaders and 
representatives of various views: students will 
share their different impressions, and follow the 
course of various issues from inception through 
decision. Through personal experience students 
should learn the issues, processes and leadership 
of the church. The course is offered as an "in- 
tensive" and may be taken for credit or audit. 
Dudley May, 1978 Spring 

BTS M-484 

Church Organizational Behavior 

Using the biblical concepts of the kingly work of 
Christ and the body of Christ as an organism, 
this course will view church organization as a 
strategic approach to revitilizing the 
congregation. Both theory and practice will be 




105 



Ministry Studies: Organization and Administration 



involved. 

Wieand Weekend Intensive TBAn Winter 

MTS M-638 

Theory of Church Organizational Behavior 

This course is designed to give the student a 
theoretical and practical approach to un- 
derstanding the behavior of church 
organizations. The interaction between 
organizational theory, the practice of ministry 
and theological perspectives on the church is 
studied. 
Worley Oct. 24-28. TBAn Fall 

MTS M-619 

Systems Analysis in Church Organizations 

The purpose of this course is to look at Church 
Organizations as systems and sub-systems; to 
understand how these systems impact each 
other; to understand how Christian mission is 
affected by the Church's systems and the en- 
vironmental systems. 
Shawchuck Nov. 28-Dec. 2, TBAn Fall 

MTS M-636 

Church Programing: What Works Where, and 

Why in Congregations 

Effective church programs reflect the needs and 
commitments of church members in two dimen- 
sions: Congregation size reflects the personal 
relationship of church members. Church type 
reflects the programatic expectations of church 
members. The First Church, the ethnic church 
and the neighborhood church, for example, ap- 
peal to people very differently. The particular 
history of the congregation and of the com- 
munity adds dimensions to the type of church. 
Taken together, congregational size and church 
type reflect the membership expectations which 
determine the range of effective program 
possibilities available to each congregation. The 
course is designed for denominational leaders 
who develop area strategy and seek resources 
for a variety of churches. What works where, 
and why. 
Dudley Oct. 17-21, TBAn Fall 

MTS M-639 
Conflict Management 

This course is essentially a workshop type course, 
combining experiential with theoretical learn- 
ings all aimed toward the practice of conflict 
management. The course is built around the 
development of a case study in managing con- 
flict by each student. Preparatory to the class 
sessions, each student chooses a conflictual 
situation that is of personal and professional 



concern to him. During class sessions this 
situation is analyzed and a plan of action is 
developed. Following class sessions the student 
enacts at least a portion of his plan of action 
and completes his case study by reporting the 
efforts and apparent consequences of these ef- 
forts to implement his cast study. 
Halverstadt Feb. 27-Mar. 3, TBAn Winter 

MTS M-603 

Developing Leaders in Congregations and 

Judicatories 

This course is designed to help identify, train 
and develop leaders in a voluntary 
organization. Leadership will be looked on as 
a function of behavior, as a reflection of style, 
and as a result of the interrelations of relevant 
systems. 
Gardiner 



Nov. 14-18, TBAn 



Fall 



MTS M-629 

Evaluating Programs of Local Churches and 

Judicatories 

This course is designed to help the church 
professionals develop evaluating tools for the 
purpose of providing information concerning 
the effectiveness and appropriateness of such 
progress. The class will address the questions: 
How are these programs affecting church 
organization itself? Are these programs making 
the most effective and appropriate use of 
available resources? Are there areas of these 
programs which need to be changed and, if so, 
how can we change them? Are the results of 
these programs what was expected? If not, why 
not? If so, why? 

Gardiner June 20-24, TBAn Summer 1977 
Gardiner May 8-12, TBAn Spring 

MTS M-625 

Effective Multiple Staff Ministry 

A major phenomenon in the church is multiple 
staff ministry in larger congregations, clusters of 
smaller congregations, and judicatories. This 
course will address both theological and prac- 
tical issues in developing effective multiple staffs. 
Multiple models and styles of increasing staff 
effectiveness will be shared. 
Worley /F. Williams Summer 1977 

June 27- July 1, TBAn 

MTS M-618 

Revitalization of Congregational Life 

The course objective is to develop within 
pastors and other church professionals the 
theory and skills needed for effective 
revitalization of congregations. Work toward 



106 



Ministry Studies: Church and Community 



this objective will include theological and 
theoretical perspectives on organizations, 
change activity and ministry. 
Magnuson June 20-24, TBAn Summer 1977 

MTS M-610 

Laity Expectations in Determining Local 

Church Programs 

Through readings, role-playing and discussion, 
the course examines the ways the laity see them- 
selves, the clergy, and the mission of the church. 
The class is especially concerned with the mis- 
perceptions which generate tensions in church 
groups, and drop-outs in goal setting programs. 
The course offers the integration of stewardship, 
evangelism, and social action as appropriate 
in differing communities. It is most helpful if 
taken following an experience in goal-setting. 
Dudley June 13-17, TBAn Summer 1977 

MTS H-605 

Recent Developments in Church Polity 

For course description consult Historical 

Studies: American offerings. 

Schafer/Worley April 17-21, TBAn Spring 

MTS T-636 

Decision-Making in Church Organizations 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Worley or Stotts March 6-10, TBAn Winter 

G. CHURCH AND COMMUNITY 

LSTC M370 

Ministry in Church and Society 

The classroom part of the course will aim at an 
understanding of contemporary social in- 
terpretation, at clarity on how one moves from 
faith to love to justice; and at a critical per- 
spective on how the church has affected and is 
affecting the social order. These aims will be 
pursued in lectures, readings and discussions. 
The parish involvement dimension of the course 
requires the student to participate in a local 
parish effort at community responsibility. The 
course intends to enable the student to integrate 
theoretical learnings with practical involvement. 
Benne TTh 10:45-12 Spring 

MTS M-312 

Membership, Stewardship and Social Action 

The course will examine the theologies and 
strategies for a) evangelism for recruitment and 
membership, b) stewardship of fincances, 
facilities, personnel and community, and c) 
social action through service, witness and con- 



frontation. Special attention is given to the 
resources and agencies of the United 
Presbyterian Church, and to the structures for 
mission in the presbyteries, synods and General 
Assembly. Suggested for middlers preparing for 
ordination examinations. 
Dudley TuW 4-6 Winter 

CCTS M-409 (half course) 

Church Strategies lor Changing Communities 

In metropolitan America, almost every com- 
munity is in transition, from the racial changes 
in the center of the cities, to the rural suburban 
transition on the growing edge, including all the 
aging of communities in between. The course 
will study cases and visit places of transition to 
determine the causes and patterns of changing 
communities. Special attention will be given to 
the positive role of the church in community 
change, and to the negative consequences of in- 
decision in the midst of change. Open to pastors 
and laypersons as well as students. 
Dudley /Bridges Tu 4-6 Spring 

MTS M-435 

Small Congregations 

Study of problems and resources for 
congregations of less than 250 members in areas 
of limited growth potential. Special emphasis 
will be given to congregational life styles and 
leadership development, to program resources 
and new sources of funding and to alternative 
styles of professional pastoral leadership 
through fraternal churches, yoked parishes, lay 
pastors and tent-making ministries. Open to 
pastors. 
Dudley Tu 7-10 pm Spring 

MTS M-450 

Dual Professional Competency Seminar 

Identification of ideologies, roles and skills 
which are common to both the ministry and 
social work, and those which are unique to 
each. Open only to students enrolled in dual 
competency M.Div. or Certificate programs. 
Register in Fall Quarter, meetings held 
throughout year. 
Dudley TBAr Fall/ Winter /Spring 

MTS M-453 

The Church and the Labor Movement 

The course will be both historical in dealing 
with the past relations of the churches to the 
working class and peoples' movement; will look 
at the theology coming out of the Social Gospel 
Movement particularly as it related to the labor 
movement and the working class and will deal 




107 



Ministry Studies: Canon Law 

with contemporary labor-related issues (e.g., 
full employment, multinational corporations, 
worker participation in industry, the work ethic) 
as these relate to issues facing the church, both 
as local congregations and as national churches. 
Persons especially related to these issues will be 
invited as guest presenters. 
Poethig Tu 2-5 Spring 

CCTS M-441 

Parish-Based Ministry with Public Community 

Colleges 

The course will examine the history, develop- 
ment, nature and uniqueness of public com- 
munity colleges in the context of American 
higher education. Arenas of potential contact 
and ministry in relation to the colleges will be 
explored. Resources at the colleges which are 
helpful to parishes will be considered. Models of 
ministries now being implemented across the 
country will be reviewed. Field trips will be con- 
ducted to the main campuses of several colleges, 
including an urban campus serving predominant- 
ly minority students and a surburban campus 
serving predominantly white students. 
Community college personnel (such as students, 
faculty, and administrators) and parish pastors 
who have related to their local colleges in 
creative ways will also serve as resource per- 
sons. Common readings and individual or 
group research projects leading to final papers. 
Initial session at LSTC. 
McGown Th 7-10 pm Spring 

CCTS 1-520 (1 full course each quarter) 

Social Transformation : Intensive Unit I 

For course description consult In- 
terdisciplinary/Integrative Studies offerings. 
Dudley /Durham F 9-12 Fall/ Winter 

Pawlikowski/Tuite plus Field Experience 

MTS M-510 

Work in Contemporary Society 

This seminar, also known as "Minister-in- 

Industry," explores, through a summer work ex- 
perience, the relation of Christian faith and 
church life to the issues of urban and industrial 
America. Drawing upon the student's daily ex- 
perience in an industrial or service job, the 
seminar presents and reflects upon such issues as 
the work ethic, the church and the working class, 
blue collar religion, ministries of involvement in 
industrial situations, working class concerns: 
job satisfaction, job security and unemploy- 
ment, worker participation in the unions 
and in management, occupational safety 
and health, justice for women and ethnic 



workers, and impact of multinational cor- 
porations. Regular Cluster cross-registration 
procedures will be followed. Credits for a full 
course at a tuition of $140 or on a non-credit 
basis for a non-refundable registration fee of $75 
payable to McCormick Seminary. Applications 
available from ICUIS, 5700 South Woodlawn. 
Registration deadline for summer 1978, May 16. 
Poethig TBAr Summer 1978 

MTS M-621 

Power and Empowerment in Church and 

Community 

This experience-based course will help persons 
recognize power as a factor in church and com- 
munity life. Emphasis will be on increasing 
skills as third party consultants in power 
situations, learning to use such intervention 
strategies as negotiation, coalition-building and 
coercion, relating intervention strategies to 
diagnostic and planning models, identifying the 
dynamics of the empowerment process and in- 
creasing personal power. 
Dietterich Dec. 5-9, TBAn Fall 

H. CANON LAW 

DIT M-315 

Introduction, Fundamental Law, General 

Norms 

The course treats the meaning of law, law and 
freedom, the place of law and of church law in 
one's life as a Christian, the methodology of ap- 
plying canon law in practice, legislators in the 
Church, subjects of church law, dispensation, 
release from legal obligation, and the relation- 
ship between western law and eastern rites. 
Danagher MWF 10:10-11 Winter 

CTU M-420 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey of present canonical prescriptions, con- 
ciliar norms and current practical application of 
legislation regarding the administration and 
reception of the sacraments. Particular emphasis 
on matrimonial law and practice. 
Bonner TTh 9-10:15 Fall 

Bonner TTh 10 : 30-11 : 45 Spring 

CTU M-421 

Church and Structure: Theology and Law 

A study of ecclesiological thought and attempts 
to concretize the theory, particularly in legal 
structures. The course involves historical sur- 
vey, as well as examination of the con- 
temporary tensions between theory and struc- 
ture. Treats theory and practical problems of in- 



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Ministry Studies : Theological Librarianship and Supervised Ministry 



terpretation of law in the contemporary Church. 
Bonner TTh 10 : 30-11 : 45 Win ter 

DIT M-416 

Selected Areas in the Ordering of the Church's 

Mission 

Treated are legal residence and its effects; 
current policy regarding Christian burial; legal 
aspects of ecumenical relationships, especially 
with regard to the sacraments; general norms 
for administration of Church property; general 
principles of penal law, with certain specific ap- 
plications; and due process. 
Danagher MWF 9:10-10 Spring 

DIT M-464 

Legal Aspects of the Sacrament of Matrimony 

A canonical study of church law on marriage 

and of its present-day applications. 

Danagher MWF 9:10-10 Fall 

DIT M-502 (2 QH) 

Canonical Matters Affecting Members of the 

Congregation of the Mission 

This course considers vows, bond, dispensation, 
canonical status and organization of General 
Assemblies and Provincial Assemblies, of 
general and Provincial government. Offered in 
response to student interest. 
Danagher TBAr TBAr 

DIT M-519 (2 QH) 
Matrimonial Jurisprudence 

A study of the procedural law on matrimony 
and of the current jurisprudence of diocesan 
tribunals in the United States, as well as that of 
the Rota, in selected areas. 
Danagher TBAr Winter 



I. THEOLOGICAL LIBRARIANSHIP 

MTS M-520 

Theological Librarianship 

Consideration will be given to such areas as the 
role of the library in education for ministry, 
theological reference materials, budgetary con- 
trol, and other aspects of seminary library ad- 
ministration: sources, and problems in 
classification and cataloging: attention will also 
be given to the development of a theological 
point of view on information science. Basic 
library courses in reference and cataloging are 
prerequisite. 
Schmitt/Hilgert/Hilgert TBAr Winter 



J. SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

CTU M-380, 385, 390 
Orientation to Supervised Ministry 
This ministry program provides guided ex- 
posure to the social and ecclesiastical scene in 
Chicago through direct experience of select 
ministerial activity. Reflection on this ex- 
perience is correlated with course work being 
taken. Six to eight students are grouped into a 
team headed by a theological reflector. 
Staff TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-310 (1 QH) 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Orientation to Pastoral Care, introductory 

readings and lectures, with intensive experiences 

and site visits to programs for disadvantaged 

people. 

Kennedy TBAr Fall 

DIT M-311, 312 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care of the Disadvantaged 

Varied experience in helping activities as spon- 
sored by social and community organizations in 
the Chicago area. Full working day, once each 
week, in centers participating in care offered 
varied ethnic groups living in disadvantaged cir- 
cumstances. Guidance in work with vouth, 
adults, aged, given by agencies' staff personnel. 
Reports and supervisory seminar at De Andreis 
once each week. 
Kennedy Th 9:10-10:10 Winter/ Spring 

CCTSM-335 
Ministry Lab : The Sick 

These courses are basic ones in the ministry of 
caring, which includes "laboratory" experience 
with a particular population as well as a 
seminar for reflection and discussion. The course 
will be held off campus and may involve staff 
persons in the locale of the course. The purpose 
is to explore the meaning of pastoral care with a 
specific group of people, which involves 
deepening self-knowledge on the part of the 
"pastor" as well as learning more specifically the 
needs of the persons the pastor seeks to serve. 
Stettner/Ashby F 2-4 Fall 

MTS M-336 

Ministry Lab : Troubled Youth 

Same description as CCTS M-335. 
Stettner F 2-4 




Winter 



MTS M-337 

Ministry Lab : Older Persons 

Same description as CCTS M-335. 
Stettner F 2-4 



Spring 



109 



Ministry Studies: Supervised Ministry 



NBTS M-377 

Introduction to Ministry in an Urban and Social 

Context 

This course, taught in conjunction with a con- 
current field placement, is an introductory sur- 
vey of the nature of the city and the forms of 
ministry appropriate to it. Biblical, theological 
and sociological data will all be explored in 
developing a Christian perspective on the city 
and the Christian response to it. 
Buzzard M 7-9 :30 pm Fall 

M/L M-352 
Field Education 

An opportunity to elect, as supplement to the 
regular internship, supervised field engagements 
in a variety of specialized settings (e.g., The 
Depot Family Counseling Agency, Washington 
Office of Social Concern, Chicago Children's 
Choir, Southwest Side Women's Center, World 
Without War Council). 
Kaufman TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

M/L M-353 

Parish and Community Internship 

The internship provides in-depth involvement in 
professional liberal religious leadership in selec- 
ted field situations under the supervision of ex- 
perienced practitioners. The program is tailored 
to the professional interests of the individual 
student; it may focus upon ministry in the 
parish, in community action, in the hospital, on 
the campus. Students placed in the greater 
Chicago area meet together regularly at the 
School for mutual exchange and disciplined 
reflection. 
Kaufman TBAr Fall/ Winter /Spring 

CTU M-480, 485, 490 

Field Education Project I, II, III 

With reflective seminar. 

Faculty TBAr Fall/ Winter /Spring 

CTU M-406 

Practicum in Basic Types of Pastoral 

Counseling 

For course description consult Pastoral Care and 

Spiritual Direction offerings. 

Mallonee F 2-4:30 Spring 

CTU M-497 
Pastoral Internship 

A two-quarter pastoral internship for priests, 
deacons, and non-ordained ministers under the 
guidance of qualified supervisors. The in- 
ternship begins with a workshop in which the 
interns and supervisors together plan and con- 
tract for the goals, tasks, and methods of 



evaluation of the intern experience. There is a 
regular schedule of reports to and evaluation by 
the supervisor and CTU Director of Field 
Education during the course of the program. 
Further details from the Office of the Director of 
Field Education. 

By Arrangement 

DIT M-420 (2 QH) 

Pastoral Care of the Mentally 111 

Day-long (working hours) experience once each 
week, with sampling of dimensions of Clinical 
Pastoral Education, in the setting of a 
psychiatric hospital, with seminars, lectures, 
work reports on pastoral visitation of patients; 
group discussions; supervision on job by 
Chaplain Supervisor and at De Andreis through 
peer-group supervisory seminar once each 
week. Enrollment limited to De Andreis 
students. 
Kennedy Tu 9-4 Fall/Spring 

DIT M-421 (2 QH) 

Pastoral Care of the Physically 111 

As in DIT M-420, but in general hospital set- 
ting. Enrollment limited to De Andreis students. 
Kennedy Tu 9-4 Fall/Spring 

DIT M-440, 441, 442 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care Through Deaconship 

Open to those ordained deacons who have com- 
pleted DIT M 310-312 and M-420, 421. Based 
on experience of being a deacon and functioning 
as a deacon in a parish setting on weekends 
and as academic responsibilities allow. Reflec- 
tion each week in seminar, by peer-group, on 
written or recorded material based on ex- 
periences in role as deacon. Enrollment limited to 
De Andreis students. 
Kennedy Th 10:10-11 Fall/Winter/Spring 

LSTC M-491, 492, 493 
Tutorial in Pastoral Counseling 

There is limited opportunity for several students 
to receive clinical pastoral supervision in 
chaplaincy-counseling ministry in the Emergen- 
cy Room-Trauma Center as well as other sec- 
tions of Christ Community Hospital. Selected 
readings, clinical interviews and case write-ups 
will be required. 

Swanson/Brooks/Otto Fall/ Winter /Spring 

TBAr 

MTS M-421, 422, 423, 424 
Clinical Pastoral Education 

This course, full time (40 to 50 hours a week) 
for a quarter, is offered in hospitals and other 
institutional settings by chaplain supervisors ac- 



110 



Ministry Studies: Supervised Ministry 



credited by the Association for Clinical Pastoral 
Education. It is a basic practicum in pastoral 
care. These programs are available in Chicago 
as well as in many other cities across the coun- 
try. Application should be made through the 
Director of Studies and the Department of 
Pastoral Care. Applications should be made at 
least one quarter ahead. One and one-half 
courses credit per quarter. 

Fall/ Win ter/Sp ring/ Sum mer 

MTS M-431, 432, 433, 434 

Field Education: Clinical Pastoral Education 

(C.P.E.) 

Same as M-421, 422, 423, 424 

Fall/ Win ter/ Spring/ Summer 

MTS M-437, 438, 439, 440 

Field Education : Supervised Team Ministry 

Recommended for Middlers. Provides ex- 
perience in, exposure to and participation in 
various ministerial roles. Up to one and one half 
courses credit if requirements are met. 
A. Hayes Fall/ Winter/ Spring/ Summer 

MTS M-446 

Field Education: Individual Field Education 

Negotiated between student, Coordinator of 
Field Education and a church or agency. This 
opportunity provides focused experience for in- 
coming students and a degree of specialization 
for senior students. Students wishing credit 
should register in the spring quarter for one half 
course credit for completion of individual 
placement field education. An additional one 
course credit may be available through the 
Director of Field Education. 
A. Hayes Spring 

NBTS M-476 

Case Studies in Ministry 

Utilizing the case study approach the course 
seeks to explore various issues surrounding 
ministry. The student's own ministry, its goals, 
styles, and effectiveness are also reviewed 
through the same process. 
Buzzard WF 8-9:20 Winter 

MTS M-505, 506, 507, 508 
Field Education: Internship 

A full-time, supervised placement in a church or 
church related agency. Interns should have com- 
pleted two years of McCormick and at least one 
year of part-time field education. Assignments 
usually begin in June or September and continue 
for 9 to 12 months. One full course per quarter 
(up to a total of 3) if taken for credit. 
Hayes Fall/Winter/ Spring/ Summer 



CTU M-505 

Advanced Practicum in Pastoral Counseling 

Prerequisite is CTU M-405 or equivalent. The 
practicum requires enrollment for all three quar- 
ters. It consists of live counseling of high school 
students, with on-going supervision on a weekly 
basis. 

TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

CTU M-517 

Ministry of Reconciliation 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 

Liturgy and Worship offerings. 

Bonner/Mallonee/ 

MacDonald/Newbold F 2-4: 30 Winter 

CTU M-518 
Practicum in Liturgy 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 

Liturgy and Worship offerings. 

Staff F 2-4: 30 Spring 

DIT M-503 (12 QH) 

Intensive Clinical Pastoral Education 

On completing DIT M-310-312 and M-420-421 
sequences, student may elect to seek enrollment 
in an intensive quarter of Clinical Pastoral 
Education at any center accredited by the 
Association for Clinical Pastoral Education to 
offer this teaching. Having made this option, 
student is required to fulfill it before ordination 
to the priesthood, but optimally before acepting 
ordination to the diaconate. Enrollment limited 
to De Andreis students. 
TBAn TBAr Summer/ Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-504, 505, 506 (2 QH each quarter) 
The Ministry of Education 

Student placement is in an educational setting 
worked out between the student and supervisor, 
namely: Lemont Teen Parish; retarded adults; 
campus ministry, or another location where 
proper on-the-job supervision is available. Peer- 
group theological reflection sessions are man- 
datory once a week. Enrollment limited to De 
Andreis students. 
Kennedy W 10:10-11 Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-507 (2 QH each quarter) 
Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 

Supervised ministry to the imprisoned. Offered 

in response to student interest. 

Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter /Spring 

DIT M-508, 509, 510 (2 QH each quarter) 
The Minister as Advocate for the Poor 

In this course the student-minister is placed as a 
paralegal aid at the Mid-South Law Office in 



^ 



111 



Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 



south Chicago. After an initial period of 
training in welfare and tenant-landlord law 
procedures, he would begin interviewing and 
working with people eligible for government- 
entitled mandatory public assistance. Besides in- 
terviewing, the student would deal with the 
Department of Public Aid, and represent the 
poor at administrative hearings. On-job super- 
vision is provided weekly by a supervising at- 
torney, and the student also participates in 
theological reflection sessions weekly. 
Placement in Latino communities is available. 
Kennedy TBAr Fall/ Winter /Spring 

DIT M-590 (2 QH) 

Pastoral Care Through Ministerial Supervision 

An opportunity to learn principles and methods 
of ministerial supervision, through directed 
readings, weekly peer-group seminar and co- 
supervision of a theological reflection seminar. 
Admittance after personal interview and per- 
mission of professor. Enrollment limited to De 
Andreis students. Offered in response to student 
interest. 
Kennedy TBAr TBAr 

CCTSM-620A,B,C: 

Practicum in Congregational Care 

Cluster Pastoral TBAr Fall/ Winter/Spring 
Care Faculty 

CCTS M-622A, B, C 

Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 

Cluster Pastoral TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 
Care Faculty 

CCTSM-624A, B, C 

Practicum in Pastoral Psychotherapy 

Cluster Pastoral TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 
Care Faculty 

CCTSM-626A,B,C 

Practicum in Group Work and Group 

Counseling 

Cluster Pastoral TBAr Fall/ Winter/Spring 
Care Faculty 

CCTS M-628A, B, C 

Practicum in Geriatric Pastoral Care 

Cluster Pastoral TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 
Care Faculty 

CCTS M-630A, B, C 

Practicum in Drug Use and Abuse 

Cluster Pastoral TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 
Care Faculty 



CCTS M-632A, B, C 

Practicum in Pastoral Care with Minority 

Groups 

Cluster Pastoral TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 
Care Faculty 

CCTS M-634A, B, C 

Practicum in Religion and Medicine 

Cluster Pastoral TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 
Care Faculty 

CCTSM-636A,B, C 

Practicum in Community Mental Health 

Cluster Pastoral TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 
Care Faculty 

CCTS M-638A, B, C 

Practicum in Clinical Pastoral Education 

Cluster Pastoral TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 
Care Faculty 

VII. INTERDISCIPLINARY/ 
INTEGRATIVE STUDIES 

CTU 1-315 

Interpretation and Ministry 

A course aimed at helping the student bring the 
Christian community's tradition (especially the 
Scriptures) to bear upon contemporary 
situations. Drawing upon materials from the 
student's own pastoral experience, the course 
will examine the theory and art of interpretation 
and analyze the interaction of situation, 
tradition, and human person in the work of 
ministry. 

Osiek/Schreiter MW 12-1: 15 Spring 

Osiek/Schreiter MW2-3:15 Spring 

CTU 1-390 

Toward Theologizing from Personal Experience 

This course introduces the student to a method 
for correlating the study of theology with the 
several dimensions of the student's own ex- 
perience of life by means of a special approach 
to journal keeping designed by Dr. Ira Progoff. 
It includes a weekend workshop, a one-day 
workshop and two one-hour feedback sessions. 
Students contract to work regularly in the Jour- 
nal and to submit a written report of the results 
of the process. 
Dorff TBAn Fall 

JSTC B-401 

Pre-Exilic Prophets and Social Concern 

For course description consult Old Testament 

offerings. 

Kenik/Tuite TTh 1-2:15 Winter 



112 



Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 



CTU B-495 

Bible Exegeted and Preached: Prophecy 

For course description consult Old Testament 

offerings. 

Baumer/Stuhlmueller TTh 12-1:15 Fall 

CTU B-490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

For course description consult Old Testament 

offerings . 

Senior/Stuhlmueller MW2-3:15 Fall 

JSTC H-416 

Patristic Interpretation of Christianity 

For course description consult Historical 

Studies: Early offerings. 

Burns/ Haight Th 2-5 Fall 

JSTC H-424 

Medieval and Reformed Interpretations of 

Christianity 

For course description consult Historical 

Studies: Medieval offerings. 

Wicks/Haight MW 1:30-3 Winter 

CTU 1-439 (1 full course each quarter) 
Christology 

A two-quarter, team-taught course on the 
mystery of Christ. The first quarter will con- 
centrate on the problems of Christology in the 
New Testament. The second quarter will treat 
the development of Christology in the history of 
Conciliar theology and in systematic theology. 
Enrollment for two quarters mandatory; 3 
credits per quarter. 
Schreiter/Senior TTh 10 : 30-11 : 45 Fall/Winter 

JSTC T-452 

Christology: Biblical, Historical, Contemporary 

For course description consult Theological 
Studies offerings. 

La Verdi ere / Bur ns/ Sch ineller Sp ring 

TTh 10:30-11:45 

CCTS 1-425 

Can the Church be Christian ? 

This course is designed to explore and assess the 
classical tensions between private, communal, 
and institutional understandings of the Christian 
religion as these are embodied in current ex- 
perience. Case studies, recent theological 
declarations, materials from the New 
Testament, sociology, and systematic theology 
will be examined. The goal is a fresh discovery 
of the relations between Christ, the Church, and 
a self-understanding of the Christian life as 
ministry. Student responsibilities will include 
assigned readings, active participation in class 
discussions, and a paper. Prerequisites: in- 



troductory courses in New Testament and 

Systematic Theology. 

W. Thompson/Burkhart W 2-5 Winter 

CTU 1-450 (1 or 2 full courses) 
Eucharist /Preaching/Celebration 

A study of the scriptural origins and historical 
development of the eucharist liturgy, with par- 
ticular emphasis on the eucharistic prayer. 
Theological reflection on the meaning of 
eucharist in light of the above and of con- 
temporary discussion. Consideration of current 
questions, e.g., ecumenical questions of inter- 
communion and eucharistic ministry. 
Those who take this course for six credits will 
also focus on communicating the eucharistic 
prayer and preaching the Eucharist. Com- 
petencies for preaching and celebration may be 
achieved through this course. Lab sessions not 
held during class time are required. Limited 
enrollment (15) for six credits with approval of 
instructors. 
Baumer/Keifer MWF 10-11: 50 Winter 

MTS M-408 

Teaching Church History in the Congregation 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 

Religious Education offerings. 

Priester/Schafer TTh 11-1 Winter 

LSTC 1-410 

Senior Seminar on Church Administration 

A program designed for seniors at LSTC, 
especially those who anticipate service in parish 
or other ministries. The course considers (1) the 
agencies and resources available to the pastor 
and the ways in which they may be utilized; (2) 
the personal as well as professional needs in 
making the transition from the vocation of the 
student to that of professional ministry; (3) 
questions and problems of church ad- 
ministration, especially parish administration. 
Kildegaard TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

W 7-10 pm 

CTU M-517 

Ministry of Reconciliation 

For course description consult Ministry Studies: 

Liturgy and Worship offerings. 

Bonner /Mallonee F 2-4: 30 Winter 

MacDonald/Newbold 

CTU 1-590 

Toward Theologizing from Personal Experience 

Course as described under CTU 1-390, but con- 
ducted for advanced students. 
Dorff TBAn Spring 



1 



113 



Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 



CCTS 1-520 (1 full course each quarter) 
Social Transformation: Intensive Unit I 

This course aims to assist students to develop an 
understanding of the interrelationships between 
Christian faith and the ministry of social trans- 
formation, between social scientific disciplines 
and the strategy and tactics of social action, and 
to become insightful and responsible par- 
ticipants in ministries of social change within 
church and community. For remainder of course 
description consult pp. 17-19. 
Dudley/Durham F 9-12 Fall/Winter 

Pawlikowski/Tuite + Field Experience 

CCTS 1-540 (2 or 3 full courses) 
Celebration : Intensive Unit I 

Intensive Unit I is an experience in a learning- 
celebrating community for the advanced student 
who wishes to become an ARTIST- 
INTERPRETER-INSTIGATOR of religious 
celebration. The phrase "artist-interpreter- 
instigator" indicates that the objectives of the 
Unit go beyond assisting the student to acquire 
the ability to function as leader of public wor- 
ship which is characteristically expected of all 
ministers. The phrase "religious celebration" in- 
cludes both the traditional forms of worship and 
also paraliturgical and other forms of com- 
munal celebration in the Judeo-Christian 
tradition. For remainder of course description 
consult pp. 19-21. 
Brown/Sittler/Wardlaw Th 9-4 Spring 

CCTS 1-560 (2 or 3 full courses) 

Cross Cultural Communication: Intensive 

Unit I 

The Intensive Unit has a double major thrust 
which will serve the needs and goals of a wide 
variety of students. On the one hand, it will 
give high priority to those students who desire 
to work or study in another cultural en- 



vironment and will help them acquire beginning 
levels of competence for effective com- 
munication in cultures and subcultures other 
than their own. At the same time, the con- 
centration will provide a wider range of stu- 
dents the opportunity to experience in a unique 
way the cultural assumptions and limits of their 
theological thinking, and to lay the foundation 
for a broader international, interracial and 
ecumenical understanding, concern and com- 
mitment both in their theological education as 
well as in their further ministry. For remainder 
of course description consult pp. 21-24. 
Armendariz/Barbour/Boberg/Pero Spring 

M9-3, W 3:30-9:30 pm 

CCTS 1-570 (2 full courses) 

Interpretation and Communication: Preaching: 

Intensive Unit I 

The Intensive Unit is designed to enable students 
to achieve competence and effectiveness in the 
preaching task (1) through the interpretation of 
biblical foundations, theological traditions, and 
contemporary events and human experiences; 
and (2) through the functional integration of the 
interpretative task in the context of sermon for- 
mulation and proclamation. For remainder of 
course description consult pp. 27-29. 

Brauch/Fischer/Kennel Th 3-9 pm Spring 
CCTST-572 

■ 

Advanced Seminar in Theology and the 
Sciences 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Burhoe/Riggan Tu 7-10 pm Spring 

MTS H-605 

Recent Developments in Church Polity 

For course description consult Historical 

Studies: American offerings. 

Schafer/Worley April 17-21, TBAn Spring 



114 



CLUSTER PERSONNEL 



FACULTY AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 
Elizabeth E. Adams (M/L) Visiting Lecturer in Religious Education (Director of 
Religious Education, First Parish, Unitarian Universalist, Lexington, Mass- 
achusetts) 
B.A., University of the Pacific; Study, Harvard University. 

Lowell C. Albee, Jr. (LSTC) Director of Library 

B.A., Upsala College; M.Div., Augustana Theological Seminary; M.S., Sim- 
mons College, School of Library Science; Study, And over-New ton Theological 
School; University of Chicago; Concordia Seminary, St. Louis. 

Robert M. Allen (BTS) Instructor in Humanities and Religion 

B.A., Manchester College; M.A.Th., Bethany Theological Seminary. 

Philip A. Anderson (CTS) Professor of Pastoral Theology 

B.A., Macalester College; B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; Ph.D. Univer- 
sity of Edinburgh. 

Ruben Armendariz (MTS) Associate Professor of Ministry and Director of Latino 
Studies Program 

B.A., University of Texas; B.D., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary; 
Study, Presbyterian Institute of Industrial Relations. 

James Armstrong (MTS) Bishop of the United Methodist Church, Dakotas Area 
A.B., Florida Southern College; B.D., Emory University; Study, University of 
Chicago; Boston University. 

Arthur O. Arnold (LSTC) President 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.Div., Augustana Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Northwestern University; D.D., Pacific Lutheran College; Study, 
University of Minnesota; University of Chicago. 

Homer U. Ashby, Jr. (CCTS) Counseling Associate, Center for Religion and Psy- 
chotherapy of Chicago 

A.B., Princeton University; M.Th., D.Mn., University of Chicago; Ph.D. 
(Cand.), Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and Northwestern Uni- 
versity. 

David W. Augsburger (NBTS) Associate Professor of Pastoral Psychology and 
Counseling 

B.A., Eastern Mennonite College; B.D., Eastern Mennonite Seminary; Ph.D., 
School of Theology at Claremont. 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU) Assistant Professor of World Mission (Minister of 
Youth, First United Presbyterian Church, Gary) 

B.S.N., Ecole d'Infirmieres et d'Assistantes Sociles du Comite National de 
Defense contre la Tuberculose, Paris; M.Div., Sorbonne et Faculte Libre de 
Theologie Protestante de Paris; S.T.M., New York Theological Seminary; 
S.T.D., Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. 

Fred A. Baumer, C.PP.S. (CTU) Instructor in Preaching and Communications 
B.A., M.A., University of Dayton; M.F.A., Catholic University of America. 



115 



Robert Benne (LSTC) Professor of Church and Society 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study, 
University of Erlangen. 

Reidar B. Bjornard (NBTS) Professor of Old Testament Interpretation 

Cand. Theol., University of Oslo; Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; Study, Uppsala University; American School of Oriental Research, 
Jerusalem. 

Colvin Blanford (NBTS) Instructor in Black Studies and Urban Church (Pastor, 
First Baptist Church, Gary) 

B.A., San Francisco State College; B.D., Berkeley Baptist Divinity School; 
Rel.D., School of Theology at Claremont. 

John Boberg, S.V.D. (CTU) Associate Professor of Mission Theology 

B.A., Divine Word Seminary, Techny; S.T.L., D.Miss., Pontifical Gregorian 
University, Rome. 

Robert G. Boling (MTS) Professor of Old Testament 

B.S., Indiana State College; M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Study, American School of Oriental Research, 
Jerusalem. 

Dismas Bonner, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Church Law 

B.A., Quincy College; J.C.B., Pontficial Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 
J. C.L., J. CD., Catholic University of America. 

Doris Ann Borchert (NBTS) Instructor in Christian Education 

B.A., Eastern Baptist College; M.R.E., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Study, Trenton State College; North American Baptist Seminary. 

Gerald L. Borchert (NBTS) Professor of New Testament and Dean 

B.A., LL.B., University of Alberta; M.Div., Eastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; Th.M., Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; Study, Princeton 
University; Albright Institute of Archaeological Research; American In- 
stitute of the Holy Land. 

Jean Bozeman (LSTC) Associate Professor of Religious Education 

A.B., Lenior Rhyne College; M.A., Temple University; M.A.R.S. (Cand.), 
University of Chicago; Study, Michigan State University; Millersville State 
College. (Sabbatical, Fall and Winter Quarters). 

Carl E. Braaten (LSTC) Professor of Systematic Theology 

A.B., St. Olaf College; B.Th., Luther Theological Seminary; Th.D., Harvard 
University; Fulbright Scholar, University of Paris (Sorbonne); Sinclair Ken- 
nedy Traveling Fellow, University of Heidelberg. 

Manfred T. Brauch (NBTS) Associate Professor of New Testament Interpretation 
B.A., Houghton College; B.D., North American Baptist Seminary; Th.M., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., McMaster University; Study, Univer- 
sitat Hamburg; Theologisches Seminar der Deutschen Baptisten. 

James F. Bresnahan, S.J. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Moral Theology 

A.B., College of the Holy Cross; M.A., Ph.L., S.T.L., Weston College; J.D., 
LL.M., Harvard Law School; J.C.B., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; 
M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University. 



116 



Alvin Bridges (CCTS) Executive Director, Associated Urban Ministries, Pres- 
bytery of Chicago 
B.A., Stillman College; M.Div., American Evangelical Divinity School. 

Arthur S. Brown (NBTS) Instructor in Evangelism (Pastor, Western Springs Bap- 
tist Church, Western Springs) 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton Graduate School of Theology; Ph.D. 
(Cand.), New York University; Study, Biblical Seminary in New York; The 
Sorbonne; University of Heidelberg. 

Dale W. Brown (BTS) Professor of Christian Theology 

B.A., McPherson College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; Ph.D., North- 
western University. (Leave of absence, 1977-78). 

Frank B. Brown (MTS, CCTS) Director of Music and Composer in Residence, Un- 
iversity Church of Disciples of Christ 
B.A., Georgetown College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Ralph Wendell Burhoe (CCTS) Director, Center for Advanced Study in Religion 
and Science; Professor Emeritus of Theology and Science, Meadville/ Lombard 
Theological School 
Sc.D., Meadville /Lombard Theological School. 

John E. Burkhart (MTS) Professor of Systematic Theology 

B.A., D.D., Occidental College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
University of Southern California; Study, University College, London. 

J. Patout Burns, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Historical Theology; (CTU) 
Lecturer in Church History 

B.A., M.A., Spring Hill College; M.Div., Regis College, Willowdale; M.Th., 
St. Michael's College, Toronto; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University. 

Lynn R. Buzzard (NBTS) Assistant Professor of Ministry and Director of Field 
Education 

B.A., M.A.T., M.Div., Duke University; S.T.D. (Cand.), San Francisco 
Theological Seminary. 

Edward F. Campbell (MTS) Francis A. McGaw Professor of Old Testament 

B.A., Yale University; B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University. 

Richard W. Carlson (MTS) Instructor in Education and Ministry and Group De- 
velopment Administrator 

B.A., North Park College; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary; D.Min., Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary. 

Forrest S. Clark (NBTS) Assistant Professor of Bibliography and Librarian 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State University; M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; M.S. in L.S., University of North Carolina; Doctoral Studies at 
Northern Illinois University. 

Adela Yarbro Collins (MTS) Assistant Professor of New Testament 

B.A., Pomona College; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University; Study, University 
of Portland; University of Tubingen. (On leave, Fall Quarter). 

Alcuin Coyle, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Church Law and President 

B.A., M.A., St. Bonaventure University; S.T.L., J. CD., Pontifical Athenaeum 
Antonianum, Rome. 

117 



Agnes Cunningham, S.S.C.M. Associate Professor of Church History, St. Mary 
of the Lake Seminary 

M.A., Marquette University; S.T.D., Facultes Catholiques, Lyon; Study, 
University of Strasbourg. 

John J. Danagher, CM. (DIT) Canon Law, Sacramental Theology 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; J. CD., University of St. Thomas, 
Rome. 

Paul M. Dietterich (MTS) Director of Service, Center for Parish Development, 
Evangelical Theological Seminary 
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; S.T.B., Th.D., Boston University. 

Francis Dorf, O.Praem. (CTU) Lecturer in Doctrinal Theology 

S.T.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., Institute Catholique, 
Paris. 

James J. Doyle S.J. (JSTC) Professor Emeritus of Fundamental Theology 

A.B., St. Louis University; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Toronto; S.T.D., L'Immaculee-Conception, Montreal. 

Carl S. Dudley (MTS) Professor of Church and Community 

B.A., Cornell University; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; D.Min., Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary; Study, New York School of Social Work; 
Washington University. 

Earl L. Durham (CCTS) Assistant Professor, School of Social Service Administra- 
tion, University of Chicago 

B.S., Roosevelt University; A.M., School of Social Service Administration, 
University of Chicago; Study, National Training Laboratory; Industrial Re- 
lations Center, University of Chicago. 

Donald F. Durnbaugh (BTS) Professor of Church History 

B.A., Manchester College; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Richard D. Eckert (NBTS) Instructor in Church Music Administration (Associate 
Pastor, North Shore Baptist Church, Chicago) 
B.M.E., Wheaton College; M.Div., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Gerard V. Egan (JSTC), Coordinator, Ministerial Program 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., West Baden College; M.A., Fordham 
University; Ph.D., Saint Louis University. 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) Assistant Professor of Social Ethics 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; B.D., Meadville Theological School; M.A., 
Ph.D. (Cand.), University of Chicago. 

William G. Enright (NBTS) Instructor in Preaching and Worship (Pastor, First 
Presbyterian Church, Glen Ellyn) 

A.B., Wheaton College; B.D., Fuller Theological Seminary; Th.M., Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. 

Robert Allen Evans (MTS) Theologian, Hartford Seminary Foundation 

B.A., Yale University; B.D., Yale Divinity School; Ph.D., Union Theological 
Seminary; Study, University of Edinburgh; University of Basel; Free University 
of Berlin. 



118 



Anthony J. Falanga, CM. (DIT) Systematic Theology and President 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; S.T.L., S.T.D., Catholic University of 
America. 

Nancy R. Faus (BTS) Instructor in Colloquium 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Columbia University. 

Wayne L. Fehr, S.J. (JSTC) Instructor in Systematic Theology 

A.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., West Baden College; M.A., Loyola University, 
Chicago; S.T.L., Sankt Georgen, Frankfurt; M.Phil., Ph.D. (Cand.), Yale 
University. 

Thomas N. Finger (NBTS) Assistant Professor of Systematic Theology 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Gordon Divinity School; Ph.D., School of 
Theology at Claremont; Study, University of Munich. 

James A. Fischer, CM. (DIT) Sacred Scripture and Academic Dean 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; S.T.L., Catholic University of America; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; LL.D., Niagara University. 

Robert H. Fischer (LSTC) Professor of Church History 

A.B., Gettysburg College; B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg; 
Ph.D., Yale University. 

Archimedes Fornasari, F. S.C.J. (CTU) Lecturer in Ethics 

B.A., M.A., Xavier University; Ph.D. Catholic University of America. 

Edmund J. Fortman, S.J. (JSTC) Professor Emeritus of Historical Theology 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., M.A., St. Louis University; S.T.L., 
St. Mary's College, Kansas; S.T.D., Pontficial Gregorian University, Rome. 

Arthur L. Foster (CTS) Professor of Theology and Personality and Director, 
Center for the Study of Theology and the Human Sciences 

B.A., McMaster University; B.D., McMaster University Divinity School; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John Fuellenbach, S.V.D. (CTU) Divine Word Scholar-in-Residence , Visiting Pro- 
fessor of Mission Theology 

S.T.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D. (Cand.), Catholic 
University of America. 

Wesley J. Fuerst (LSTC) Professor of Old Testament and Dean of Faculty 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., Central Lutheran Theological 
Seminary; Th.D., Princeton Theology Seminary; Study, University of 
Erlangen. 

Ismael Garcia (MTS) 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.A., Ph.D. (Cand.), University of 
Chicago. 

James Gardiner (MTS) Associate Synod Executive, Synod of Florida 

A.B., Northern Illinois University; M.Div., S.T.M., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Richard B. Gardner (BTS) Visiting Lecturer in New Testament Studies (Editor 
of Biblical Resources, Parish Ministries Commission, Office of the General 
Board of the Church of the Brethren, Elgin) 

B.A., Juniata College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; Dip. in Theol., 
University of Wurzburg. 

119 



Dennis Geaney, O.S.A. (CTU) Associate Professor of Ministry and Director of 
Field Education 
A.B., Villanova University; M.A., Catholic University of America. 

Neil Gerdes (M/L) Librarian and Instructor in Bibliography, (CCTS) Director 
of Library Programs 

A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard University; M.A., Columbia 
University; M.A., University of Chicago. 

Francis Germovnik, CM. (DIT) Librarian and Modern and Classical Languages 
A.B., University of Ljubluana, Yugoslavia; M.A.L.S., Rosary College; J.C.L., 
J. CD., University of St. Thomas, Rome. 

John Charles Godbey (M/L) Associate Professor of Church History and Academic 
Dean 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., Federated Theological Faculty, 
University of Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Myron Gohmann, CP. (CTU) Associate Director of Library 

L.Hist.E., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 
(Sabbatical, 1977-78). 

Jorge Gonzalez (MTS) Gund Professor of Religion, Berry College 

B.L., Candler College, Marianao, Cuba; T.S.B., Seminario Evangelico de 
TeologfaMantanzas, Cuba; Ph.D., Emory University. 

Justo Gonzalez (MTS) Writer, Editorial Caribe 

B.A., University of Havana; S.T.B., Union Theological Seminary, Matanzas, 
Cuba; S.T.M., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; Study, Yale University. 

Warren F. Groff (BTS) Professor of Christian Theology and President 

B.A., Juniata College; B.D., Yale Divinity School; Ph.D., Yale University. 

William G. Guindon, S.J. (JSTC) President and Dean 

A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.L., S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Roger D. Haight, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Systematic Theology 

B.A., M.A., Berchmans College, Cebu; S.T.B., Woodstock College; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Winfield S. Hall (LSTC) Instructor, New Testament Greek 

A.B., Haverford College; S.T.B., Harvard Divinity School; Th.D. (Cand.), 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 

Hugh F. Halverstadt (MTS) Pastor, Covenant Church, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 

A.B., King College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

Maryanne Hanak (CTU) Associate Director of Library 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.L.S., State University of New York at Albany. 

John A. Hardon, S.J. (JSTC) Research Professor of Fundamental Theology 

A.B., John Carroll University; M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; S.T.L., 
West Baden College; S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. 

William E. Hartenbach, CM. (DIT) Church History, Patrology 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; M.A., Ph.D. (Cand.), Catholic Univer- 
sity of America. 

120 



Ardith Spierling Hayes (MTS) Associate Professor of Ministry and Director of Stu- 
dies and of Field Education 
B.A., College of Wooster; B.D., Th.M, Yale Divinity School. 

Franklin W. Hayes (MTS) Alcholism Counselor, Oak Park Family Service and Men- 
tal Health Center and Berwyn Family Service and Mental Health Center 
B.A., North Central College; B.D., Yale Divinity School; M.A., Yale Univer- 
sity. 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., Quincy College; Dr. Theol., Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn; 
Litt.D., St. Bonaventure University. (Sabbatical, Winter and Spring Quarters). 

Shirley J. Heckman (BTS) Visiting Lecturer in Christian Education (Consultant 
for Educational Development, Parish Ministries Commission, Office of the 
General Board of the Church of the Brethren, Elgin) 

B.A., University of Denver, M.R.E., Iliff School of Theology; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Denver. 

Phillip J. Hefner (LSTC) Professor of Systematic Theology 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., Chicago Lutheran Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; Fulbright Scholar, University 
of Tubingen. (Sabbatical, Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters). 

Earle Hilgert (MTS) Professor of Bibliography and New Testament Studies 

B.A., Walla Walla College; B.D., Adventist Theological Seminary; M.A., 
University of Chicago; D. Theol., University of Basel. 

Elvire Hilgert (MTS) Assistant Librarian 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.L.S., Catholic University of America; Study, 
Adventist Theological Seminary; University of the Philippines, Manila; Univer- 
sity of Basel. 

John O. Hodges (CCTS) 

A.B., Morehouse College; M.A. (English), Atlanta University; M.A., Ph.D. 
(Cand.), University of Chicago; Study, University of Nantes; Yale University. 

Estella Boggs Horning (BTS) Visiting Lecturer in Biblical Studies 

B.A., Manchester College; R.N., Presbyterian Hospital; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Doctoral Studies, Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary and Northwestern University. 

Damien Isabell, O.F.M. (CTU) Associate Professor of Spiritual Theology 

B.A., Quincy College; S.T.B., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 
S.T.L., S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. 

Masami Ishii (LSTC) Visiting Professor of Missions (Professor of Systematic Theo- 
logy, Japan Lutheran Theological College/ Seminary) 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia; M.Th., Luther 
Theological Seminary at St. Paul; Study, Japan Lutheran Theological 
Seminary. 

E. Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) Professor of Christian Education 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Theodore W. Jennings, Jr. (CTS) Assistant Professor of Theology 
B.A., Duke University; B.D., Ph.D., Emory University. 

121 



Robert Karris, O.F.M. (CTU) Associate Professor of New Testament 

B.A., Quincy College; S.T.B., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 
S.T.L., Catholic University of America; Th.D., Harvard Divinity School. 

Peter I. Kaufman (M/L) Visiting Assistant Professor of Constructive Theology 
B.A., Trinity College; B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Ralph A. Keifer (CTU) Associate Professor of Liturgy 

B.A., Providence College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 

Robert Kemper (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in Preaching (Senior Minister, First 
Congregational Church, Western Springs) 
B.A., Cornell College; M.Div., Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Helen A. Kenik, O.P. (JSTC) Instructor in Biblical Theology 

B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S., Barry College; Ph.D. (Cand.), St. Louis 
University. 

Dennis O. Kennedy, CM. (DIT) Sacramental Theology, Liturgy, Pastoral and 
Field Education 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; M.A., University of Notre Dame; 
M.Div., DeAndreis Institute of Theology; D.Min. (Cand.), Catholic University 
of America. 

LeRoy E. Kennel (BTS) Professor of Communications 

B.A., Goshen College; M.A., Iowa State University; B.D., Goshen College 
Biblical Seminary; Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Axel C. Kildegaard (LSTC) Professor of Functional Theology 

A.B., State University of Iowa; Cand. Theol., Grand View Seminary; S.T.M., 
Yale University. 

Dennis C. Kinlaw (MTS) Special Projects Officer for Chief of Chaplains, U.S. Na- 
vy 

B.S., Florida Southern College; B.D., Garrett Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Wesley Theological Seminary; D.Ed., George Washington University. 

Walter J. Kukkonen (LSTC) Professor of Pastoral and Historical Theology 

B.S., Northern Illinois University; M.Div., S.T.M., S.T.D., Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Study, Concordia Theological Seminary, Springfield; 
Suomi Theological Seminary; University of Helsinki. 

Andre Lacocque (CTS) Professor of Old Testament and Director, Center for Jew- 
ish-Christian Studies 
D.Litt., D. Theol., University of Strasbourg. 

Eugene A. LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Biblical Theology 
B.A., M.A., John Carroll University; S.S.L., Pontifico Istituto Biblico; Eleve 
Titulaire, Ecole Biblique, Jerusalem; M.A., Ph.D. (Cand.), University of 
Chicago. 

Perry D. LeFevre (CTS) Professor of Theology and Dean 

B.A., Harvard University; B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 



122 



David L. Lindberg (LSTC) Associate Professor of Missions; Director of 
Field Education and Acting Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 
A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.Div., Augustana Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU) Lecturer in Doctrinal Theology (Provincial Councillor, 
Chicago Province of the Viatoirans, Arlington Heights) 

B.A., Georgetown University; S.T.B., M.A., S.T.L., S.T.D., University of 
Louvain. 

Wilhelm C. Linss (LSTC) Professor of New Testament 

B.D. (equiv.), University of Erlangen; Th.D., Boston University School of 
Theology; Study, University of Munster; University of Michigan. (Sabbatical, 
Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters). 

Sebastian MacDonald, C.P. (CTU) Professor of Ethics 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; S.T.L., S.T.D., University of 
St. Thomas, Rome; Study, Princeton University. 

George P. Magnuson (MTS) Professorial Lecturer in Church and Ministry and 
Major Project Administrator 

B.A., University of Minnesota; B.D., North Park Theological Seminary; M.A., 
D.Min., McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Robert W. Mallonee, S.V.D. (CTU) Associate Professor of Pastoral Care 

B.A., Baldwin- Wallace College; M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.A.L.S., 
Rosary College; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Clyde L. Manschreck (CTS) Professor of Church History and Director, Center 
for Reformation and Free Church Studies 

B.A., George Washington University; B.D., Garrett Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Randall Mason (CTS) Adjunct Faculty (Director, Center for Religion and Psy- 
chotherapy of Chicago) 

B.A., B.D., Duke University; S.T.M., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Washington University. 

David J. McGown (CCTS) Campus Minister, University of Illinois at Chicago 
Circle and Coordinator, Metropolitan Task Force, United Commission on Cam- 
pus Christian Ministries 

B.A., Yale University; B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary; Study New 
York Theological Seminary; San Diego State College; Kansas State University. 

Duncan Mcintosh (NBTS) Instructor in World Mission (Pastor, Geneva Road 
Baptist Church, Wheaton, Illinois) 

B.Mus., Houghton College; B.D., Th.M., Fuller Theological Seminary; D.Min. 
(Cand.), Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Harry C. Meserve (M/L) Minister -in-Residence 

A.B., Haverford College; S.T.B., Harvard University; D.D., Mead- 
ville/Lombard Theological School. 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) Visiting Lecturer in Historical Theology 
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 



123 



J. Robert Meyners (CTS) Associate Professor of Theology and Urban Culture 

B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; Th.D., Union Theological Seminary; 
Study, University of Redlands. 

Walter L. Michel (LSTC) Assistant Professor of Old Testament 

B.D. (equiv.), University of Vienna; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; 
Study, University of Heidelberg; Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; 
Western Michigan University; Yale University. 

Donald E. Miller (BTS) Professor of Christian Education and Ethics and Director 
of Graduate Studies 

M.A., University of Chicago; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Harvard University; Study, Yale University; Cambridge University. 

Oscar J. Miller, CM. (DIT) Communications, Homiletics 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; M.A., Northwestern University. 

John P. Minogue, CM. (DIT) Moral Theology, Systematics 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; M.A., DePaul University; Doctoral 
Studies, Catholic University of America. 

Michael Montague, S.J. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Historical Theology and 
Director of Continuing Education 

A.B., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; 
Ph.D., Saint Louis University. 

Robert L. Moore (CTS) Assistant Professor of Theology and Personality and 
Acting Director of Clinical Studies 

B.A., Hendrix College; M.Th., Southern Methodist University; M.Th., Duke 
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study, Alfred Adler 
Institute, Chicago. 

Lewis S. Mudge (MTS) Professor of Theology and Dean 

B.A., Princeton University; B.A., M.A., Oxford University; B.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Amherst College; Ph.D., Princeton University; 
Study, University of Marburg, University of Paris. 

J. Gordon Myers, S.J. (JSTC) Coordinator, Ministerial Team and Adjunct Assis- 
tant Professor of Pastoral Theology 

B.S., B.A., Xavier University, Cincinnati; M.Div., Regis College, Willowdale; 
M.R.Ed., Loyola University, Chicago; Study, National Training Laboratory; 
Center for the Study of the Person, La Jolla; Human Development Training In- 
stitute, San Diego. 

William R. Myers (MTS ) Assistant Pastor, Flossmoor Community Church, Floss- 
moor 

B.A., Westminster College; M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; M.Ed. 
(Counseling), Rhode Island College. 

William R. Myers (NBTS) President 

B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
D.D., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary; Study, Union Theological 
Seminary; Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) Lecturer in Ethics 

B.A., Quincy College; M.Div., M.A., Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D. 
(Cand.), University of Chicago. 

124 



F. Burton Nelson Professor of Theology and Ethics, North Park Theological Semi- 
nary 

B.A., Brown University; B.D., Yale University Divinity School; Ph.D., North- 
western University and Garrett Theological Seminary; Study, North Park 
Theological Seminary. 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU) Associate Professor of Church History 

B.A., Divine Word Seminary, Techy; L.Miss., Pontifical Gregorian University, 
Rome; M.A., Catholic University of America; Ph.D. (Cand.), Cambridge 
University. (On leave for doctoral studies, Fall Quarter). 

Thomas More Newbold, C.P. (CTU) Professor Emeritus of Pastoral Theology 
B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; Maitre-es-Sc-Med., L'Institut 
d'Etude Medieval d' Albert le Grand; Ph.D., University of Montreal. 

Morris J. Niedenthal (LSTC) Professor of Functional Theology 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.Div., Chicago Lutheran Theological 
Seminary; Th.D., Union Theological Seminary; Fulbright Scholar, Manchester 
University, England. 

N. Leroy Norquist (LSTC) Associate Professor of New Testament 

A.B., Augustana College; M.Div., Augustana Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Wittenberg University; Ph.D., Hartford Seminary Foundation; Study Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary. 

John J. O'Callaghan, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Moral Theology 

A.B., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; 
S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. (Academic leave, 1976-78). 

James I. O'Connor, S.J. (JSTC) Professor Emeritus of Pastoral Care and Spiritu- 
ality 

Litt.B., M.A., Xavier University; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; J.C.B., 
Catholic University of America; J.C.L., J. CD., Pontifical Gregorian Univer- 
sity, Rome. 

Eric H. Ohlmann (NBTS) Associate Professor of Church History 

B.A., University of Alberta; B.D., North American Baptist Seminary; Th.M., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.D., Graduate Theological Union; 
Study, Predigerseminar, Hamburg. 

Kenneth OTvlalley, C.P. (CTU) Director of library 

M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D. (Cand.), University of Illinois; 
Study, University of Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; Saint Louis Univer- 
sity; Spalding College. 

Carolyn A. Osiek, R. S.C.J. (CTU) Instructor in New Testament Studies 

B.A., Fontbonne College, St. Louis; M.A.T., Manhattanville College; Th.D. 
(Cand.), Harvard Divinity School. 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Doctrinal Theology and Dean 

B.A., Quincy College; S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical Anthenaeum Antoni- 
anum, Rome; Study, Harvard Divinity School. (Sabbatical, Winter and Spring 
Quarters). 

Thomas D. Parker (MTS) Professor of Systematic Theology 

B.A., Los Angeles State College; B.D., San Francisco Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; Study, University of Munich. 

125 



John Paul, M.S.C. (CTU) Dean of Students 

S.T.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; J. CD., Catholic University of 
America. 

John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) Associate Professor of Ethics 
A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) Chautauqua Professor of Jewish Studies 

B.A., McGill University, Montreal; M.H.L., Jewish Institute of Religion, New 
York; D.H.L. (Cand.), Hebrew Union College — Hebrew University; D.D., 
Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati. 

Albert Pero, Jr. (LSTC) Instructor in Religious Education and Constructive 
Theology; (CTU) Lecturer in Constructive Theology 

A.B., M.A., University of Detroit; B.Th., Concordia Theological Seminary, 
Springfield; S.T.D., Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 

Richard P. Poethig (MTS) Professorial Lecturer in Church and Industrial Society 
and Director of Institute on the Church in Urban-Industrial Society 
B.A., College of Wooster; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary; Study, 
Ateneo University of Manila; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Marcus J. Priester (MTS) Professor of Christian Education 

B.A., D.D., Grove City College; S.T.B., S.T.M., Western Theological 
Seminary; Th.D., University of Toronto; Study, Clarion State Teacher 
College. 

Jerome W. Rausch, O.S.C. (CTU) Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
and Assistant Dean 

S.T.D., University of St. Thomas, Rome; Eleve Titulaire, Ecole Biblique, 
Jerusalem; Study, University of Notre Dame. 

David C. Reeves (MTS) Associate Professor of New Testament 

B.A., Occidental College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Harvard 
University; Study, University of Gottingen. 

V. Bruce Rigdon (MTS) Professor of Church History 

B.A., College of Wooster; B.D., Yale Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., Yale 
University; Study, Oxford University. 

George A. Riggan (M/L) Visiting Professor of Theology (Riley Professor of Sys- 
tematic Theology, Hartford Seminary Foundation) 

B.A., Oklahoma City University; B.D., Garrett Biblical Institute; Ph.D., Yale 
University; Study, University of Heidelberg; Center for Advanced Study in 
Theology and the Sciences. 

Paul V. Robb, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care and Spirituality 
(Director, Institute for Spritual Leadership) 

Litt.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Loyola University, Chicago. 

Charles Shelby Rooks (CTS) Associate Professor of Ministry and President 

B.A., Virginia State College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; D.D., College 
of Wooster; Study, Columbia University; Oxford University. 

Eugene F. Roop (BTS) Associate Professor in Biblical Studies 

B.S., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Claremont Graduate School. 

126 



Theodore C. Ross, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Historical Theology 

Litt.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., West Baden College; M.A. (History), M.A. 
(Theology), Loyola University, Chicago; S.T.L., Bellarmine School of 
Theology. 

Byron P. Royer (BTS) Professor of Pastoral Psychology 

B.S., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; M.A., North- 
western University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Rosemary R. Ruether (MTS) Georgia Harkness Professor, Garrett-Ev angelical The- 
ological Seminary 
B.A., Scripps College; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School. 

Rafael Sanchez (MTS) General Presbyter, Presbytery of the Alamo 

B.A., University of Kansas; M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary; M.A., 
University of Wisconsin; Study, Menninger Foundation. 

Gary R. Sattler (NBTS) Instructor in Christian Education (Director, Cooperative 
Outreach Program to Youth, Glen Ellyn) 

B.A., Midland College; M.Div., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.M. 
(Cand.), McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Thomas A. Schafer (MTS) Professor of Church History 

B.A., Maryville College; B.D., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Duke University. 

James A. Scherer (LSTC) Professor of Missions and Church History 

A.B., Yale University; B.D., Th.D., Union Theological Seminary; Study, 
Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; Columbia University; International 
Christian University, Japan; Oxford University. 

J. Peter Schineller, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Fundamental Theology 
A.B., M.A., Fordham University; Ph.L., B.D., Woodstock College; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Calvin H. Schmitt (MTS) Professor of Bibliography 

B.A., University of Dubuque; M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary; 
Litt.D., Alma College; Study, University of New Mexico; Union Theological 
Seminary; Columbia University. 

Carl D. Schneider (M/L) Assistant Professor of Religion and Personality 

B.A., Albright College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Harvard 
University. 

Robert J. Schreiter, C.PP.S. (CTU) Assistant Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., St. Joseph's College; Th.Dr., Katholieke Universitieit, Nijmegen. 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) Professor of Religion and Society 

B.A., Bethel College; M.A., Michigan State University; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Robert C. Schultz (DIT) Psychology (Director of Field Education, Lutheran 
Theological Southern Seminary) 

A.B., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; Dr.Theol., Friedrich Alexander 
University, Erlangen; Study, Harvard Divinity School; Menninger Foundation. 



127 



Robin J. Scroggs (CTS) Professor of New Testament 

B.A., B.Mus., University of North Carolina; B.D., Duke University; Ph.D., 
Princeton University. 

Robert T. Sears, SJ. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Fundamental Theology 

A.B., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., West Baden College; S.T.L., 
Sankt Georgen, Frankfurt; Ph.D., Fordham University. 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) Assistant Professor of New Testament Studies 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; Bacculareate en Theologie, 
S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain. 

Neil H. Shadle (M/L) Assistant Professor of Field Education 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; B.D., Meadville Theological School. (Sab- 
batical, Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters). 

Norman Shawchuck (MTS) Project Director, Parish Development Project, Insti- 
tute for Ministry Development 

Diploma, Trinity Bible Institute; B.A., Jamestown College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Franklin Sherman (LSTC) Professor of Christian Ethics and Director of Graduate 
Studies 

A.B., Muhlenberg College; M.Div., Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Oxford University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Joseph Sittler (LSTC) Visiting Professor in Theology 

A.B., LL.D., Wittenberg University; B.D., Hamma School of Theology; D.D., 
Wagner College; L.H.D., Alfred University; Litt.D., Meadville Theological 
School; Study, Gettysburg College; University of Notre Dame; Loyola Univer- 
sity, Chicago; Oberlin College; University of Chicago; Western Reserve 
University; University of Heidelberg. 

Graydon F. Snyder (BTS) Professor of Biblical Studies and Dean 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; Th.D., Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary; Study, Pontifical Institute of Christian Archaeology, 
Rome; Cambridge University. 

Alphonse Spilly, C.PP.S. (CTU) Assistant Professor of Old Testament Studies 
B.A., M.A., University of Dayton; Ph.D., (Cand.), University of Chicago. 

Charles S. Spivey (CCTS) Senior Pastor, Quinn Chapel, African Methodist 
Episcopal Church 

B.S., Wilberforce University; B.D., Yale Divinity School; Study, Oberlin 
Graduate School of Theology; University of Pittsburgh. 

John W. Stettner (MTS) Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 

B.A., Ohio State University; B.D., Yale Divinity School; M.A., University of 
Chicago; Th.D., Iliff School of Theology; Study, Jung Institute, Zurich. 

Jack L. Stotts (MTS) Professor of Christian Ethics and President 

B.A., Trinity University; B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., Yale University; Study, Oxford University. 

Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P. (CTU) Professor of Old Testament Studies 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; S.T.L., Catholic University; 
S.S.L., S.S.D., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; D.H.L., St. Benedict College. 

128 



Paul R. Swanson (LSTC) Professor of Pastoral Care 

A.B., Augustana College; M.Div., Augustana Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Andover Newton Theo'ogical School; Ph.D., Boston University. 

Tyler Thompson Professor of Philosophy of Religion, Garrett-Ev angelical Theo- 
logical Seminary 

B.S., California Institute of Technology; S.T.B., Boston University School of 
Theology; Ph.D., Boston University. 

William G. Thompson, S.J. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Biblical Theology 

A.B., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; 
S.S.L., S.S.D., Pontificio Istituto Biblico, Rome. 

Robert I. Tobias (LSTC) Professor of Ecumenics and Director of Doctor of Min- 
istry Program and of Continuing Education 

A.B., Phillips University; M.A., Graduate School of Theology, Phillips Univer- 
sity; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Th.D., University of Geneva and 
Graduate School of Ecumenical Studies. (Sabbatical, Fall, Winter and Spring 
Quarters). 

Marjorie Tuite, O.P. (JSTC) Coordinator, Ministerial Program 

A.B., Ohio Dominican College; M.A., Fordham University; M.A., Manhattan 
College. 

Herbert D. Valentine (MTS) Executive Presbyter, Presbytery of Baltimore 

B.S., University of California; B.D., San Francisco Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Roman Vanasse, O.Praem. (CTU) Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
and Director of M.A. Program 

B.A., St. Norbert College; S.T.L., S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, 
Rome; Study, Oriental Institute, University of Chicago; Pontifical Biblical In- 
stitute, Rome. 

Dennis H. Vanlier, S.J. (JSTC) Lecturer in Pastoral Care and Spirituality 

Ph.L., Berchmanianum, Nijmegen; M.A. (equiv.), University of Amsterdam; 
S.T.L., Canisianum, Maastricht; S.T.M., D.Min., Andover-Newton 
Theological School. 

Arthur Voobus (LSTC) Professor of New Testament and Church History 
Cand. Theol., Mag. Theol., Dr. Theol., University of Tartu, Estonia. 

Murray L. Wagner (BTS) Librarian and Assistant Professor of Bibliography 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 

Michael F. Walsh, CM. (DIT) Sacred Scripture 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; M.A., Catholic University of America; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome. 

Donald Wardlaw (MTS) Professor of Preaching and Worship 

B.A., Columbia College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia; 
Ph.D., University of Aberdeen. 

Harold D. Weiss (MTS) Professor of Religion, University of Notre Dame 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., B.D., Andrews University; Ph.D., 
Duke University; Study, Union Theological Seminary. 

129 



Frederick K. Wentz (CCTS) Executive Director 

B.A., Gettysburg College; B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg; 
Ph.D., Yale University; Litt. D., Thiel College; D.D., Hartwick College; 
Study: University of Southern California. 

Jared Wicks, S.J. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Historical Theology 

Litt.B., Xavier University; M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., 
West Baden College; Dr. Theol., University of Munster. (Academic leave, 
Spring 1978, Associate Professor of Theology, Wau Major Seminary, Republic 
of the Sudan.) 

David J. Wieand (BTS) Professor of Biblical Studies and Director of Continuing 
Education 

B.A., Juniata College; M.A., New York University; B.D., Bethany Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study, Chicago Institute of Psycho- 
analysis; National Training Laboratory; National Protestant Laboratory, 
Green Lake; American School of Oriental Research, Jerusalem; Northeast 
Career Center, Princeton; Brook Lane Psychiatric Center, Hagerstown. 

James E. Will Professor of Systematic Theology and Director of Peace 
Institute, Garrett-Ev angelical Theological Seminary 

B.A., North Central College; B.D., Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Columbia University and Union Theological Seminary; Study, The Free 
University, West Berlin; University of Vienna. 

Donald Foster Williams (CCTS) Director of Academic Affairs 

B.A., Baylor University; M.R.E., New York Theological Seminary; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., New York University; M.B.A. (Cand.), 
University of Chicago; Study, Trinity University; University of Southern Cali- 
fornia; Harvard University. 

Frank C. Williams (MTS) Executive Director, Midwest Career Development Center 
B.A., Alma College; M.A., Michigan State University; M.Div., D.Min., Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary. 

Robert C. Worley (MTS) Professor of Education and Ministry and Director of 
Doctor of Ministry Program 

B.A., Oklahoma State University; D.D.S., M.S., Northwestern University; 
B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia University. 

Jeremiah A. Wright (CCTS) Pastor, Trinity United Church of Christ, Chicago 
B.A., M.A. (English), Howard University; M.A. (Theology), Ph.D. (Cand.), 
University of Chicago. 

Joseph F. Wulftange, S.J. (JSTC) Professor Emeritus of Fundamental Theology 
A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; M.S., St. Louis University; Ph.L., S.T.L., 
West Baden College; M.S., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Pontifical 
Gregorian University, Rome. 

Hyang Sook Chung Yoon (CTU) Associate Director of Library 

A.B., M.A., Seoul National University; M.L.S., University of Texas, Austin. 

Warren Cameron Young (NBTS) Professor of Theology and Christian Philosophy 
A.B., Gordon College; M.A., Ph.D., Boston University; Study, University of 
Heidelberg; University of Basel. 



130 



Barbara Brown Zikmund (CTS) Assistant Professor of Church History and Direc- 
tor of Studies 
B.A., Beloit College; B.D., Ph.D., Duke University. 

LIBRARIANS 

Lowell C. Albee, Jr. (LSTC) Director of Library; (Jesuit/Lutheran (Krauss)/ 
McCormick Libraries) Coordinator of Readers Services 

B.A., Upsala College; M.Div., Augustana Theological Seminary; M.S., Sim- 
mons College, School of Library Science; Study, Andover-Newton Theological 
School; University of Chicago; Concordia Seminary, St. Louis. 

Kathleen A. Arthur (Jesuit/Lutheran (Krauss) /McCormick Libraries) Periodicals 
Department Assistant 
B.A., Indiana University; M.A., (Cand.), University of Chicago. 

Joan Blocher (CTS) Assistant Librarian 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 

Forrest S. Clark (NBTS) Librarian; (The Library of Bethany and Northern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminaries) Director of Instructional Services 
B.A., Middle Tennessee State University; M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; M.S.L.S., University of North Carolina; Doctoral Studies, Northern 
Illinois University. 

Janet Davidson (MTS) Religious Education Librarian 

B.A., Millikin College; M.A.R.E., McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Arlene M. Feiner (JSTC) Librarian; (Jesuit/Lutheran (Krauss) /McCormick Librar- 
ies) Coordinator of Periodical Collection 

B.A., Alverno College; M.A.L.S., Rosary College; Study, Georgetown Univer- 
sity; George Washington University; American University; Indiana University. 

Neil Gerdes (M/L) Librarian; (CCTS) Director of Library Programs 

A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard University; M.A., Columbia 
University; M.A., University of Chicago. 

Francis Germovnik, CM. (DIT) Librarian 

B.A., University of Ljubluana, Yugoslavia; M.A.L.S., Rosary College; J.C.L., 
J. CD., University of St. Thomas, Rome. 

Myron Gohmann, C.P. (CTU) Associate Director of Library 

L.Hist.E., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 
(Sabbatical, 1977-78). 

Maryanne Hanak (CTU) Associate Director of Library 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.L.S., State University of New York at Albany. 

Earle Hilgert (Jesuit/Lutheran (Krauss) /McCormick Libraries) Coordinator of 
Collection Development 

A.B., Walla Walla College; B.D., Adventist Theological Seminary; M.A., 
University of Chicago; D.Th., University of Basel. 

Elvire Hilgert (MTS) Assistant Librarian; (Jesuit/Lutheran (Krauss)/McCormick 
Libraries) Coordinator of Technical Services 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.L.S., Catholic University of America; Study, 
Adventist Theological Seminary; University of the Philippines, Manila; Univer- 
sity of Basel. 

131 



Albert E. Hurd (CTS) Librarian 

A.B., Michigan State University; B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; M.A. 
(Cand.), University of Chicago. 

Elinor C. Johnson (LSTC) Associate Librarian 

A.B., Augustana College; M.A., University of Chicago. 

Judy Knop (Jesuit/Lutheran (Krauss)/McCormick Libraries) Catalog Librarian 
A.B., Park College; M.A. (Cand.), University of Chicago. 

Kenneth CMalley, C.P. (CTU) Director of Library 

M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D. (Cand.), University of Illinois; 
Study, University of Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; Saint Louis Univer- 
sity; Spalding College. 

Vera L. Robinson (NBTS) Catalog Librarian (The Library of Bethany and Nor- 
theran Baptist Theological Seminaries) 
A.B., Westmar College; M.A. University of Chicago. 

Calvin H. Schmitt (MTS) Librarian; (Jesuit/Lutheran (Krauss)/McCormick Librar- 
ies) General Director 

A.B., University of Dubuque; M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary; 
Litt.D., Alma College; Study, University of New Mexico; Union Theological 
Seminary; Columbia University. 

Kenneth M. Shaffer (BTS) Acquisitions Librarian (The Library of Bethany and 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminaries) 

A.B., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; Study, 
Northern Illinois University. 

Gwendolyn R. Vandon (BTS) Circulation and Serials Librarian (The Library of 
Bethany and Northern Baptist Theological Seminaries) 
L.T.A., College Of DuPage. 

Murray L. Wagner (BTS) Librarian; (The Library of Bethany and Northern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminaries) Director of Technical Services 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 

Marian Wiegel, R.S.M. (JSTC) Assistant Librarian 

B.Ed., St. Xavier College; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 

Hyang Sook Chung Yoon (CTU) Associate Director of Library 

A.B., M.A., Seoul National University; M.L.S., University of Texas, Austin. 



132 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CLUSTER LIBRARY SERVICES 

The Cluster supports a vigorous library program which provides many benefits 
to students and faculty. The combined Cluster library collections comprise over 
800,000 volumes and represent one of the largest collections among theological 
consortia in the nation. A Union List of 1700 current periodicals assist Cluster 
library users in locating desired titles, and all Cluster library users have access to 
the Cluster Union Catalog of holdings acquired since July 1972, which is located at 
the Jesuit/Lutheran/McCormick Libraries. The loan of books or periodicals be- 
tween Cluster schools is facilitated by the use of an interlibrary teletype and courier 
system, and direct access to all Cluster libraries is provided by a Cluster I.D. card. 
A staff of twenty library professionals with various subject specializations is 
available to assist users with reference and research problems. The Cluster libraries 
have uniform policies for loan periods, care of reserve books, reference books, 
periodicals and costs for photocopying. 

Other Cluster library cooperative programs that benefit users are a coordinated 
joint acquisitions program for books, periodicals, and monograph series. Begin- 
ning in 1977 the Cluster libraries will participate in the services of the Ohio College 
Library Center. 

Beyond the Cluster library resources are those of other Chicago seminaries and 
universities, the Chicago Public Library, Newberry Library, and John Crerar 
Library. All Cluster libraries belong to the Illinois Library and Information Net- 
work (ILLINET) which provides access to statewide library resources as well as the 
bibliographic services of the Ohio College Library Center. 

Each Cluster library has its special strengths or collections. Below is a brief 
description of the kinds of special holdings to be found in the Cluster: 

* Bethany Theological Seminary: Special strengths in Brethren history, Pietism, 
peace studies, and psychological journals. Special collections are the Abraham H. 
Cassell Collection of 19th century historical and theological books and pamphlets, 
and the Huston Bible Collection, which represents over four hundred volumes with 
numerous editions of the English Bible. 

Catholic Theological Union: Special collection strength in the subjects of Scrip- 
ture, patrology, canon law, and missiology. 

Chicago Theological Seminary: Collection strength in ethics, sociology of religion, 
psychology and personality sciences. Special collections are in Congregational and 
Puritan studies and Hebraica. 

DeAndreis Institute of Theology: Collection strength in Vincentiana, Scripture and 
Catholic church history. 

+ Jesuit School of Theology: Special collection strengths in Jesuistica, modern and 
contemporary continental philosophy, patristics, medieval scholastic theology and 
Catholic systematic theology. 

+ Lutheran School of Theology: Collection strength in church history, theology, 
Lutheran Orthodoxy, Pietism, and recent continental theology. Special collections 
of published and unpublished materials related to the history of the Lutheran 
Church in America, United Lutheran Church, Augustana Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, American Evangelical Lutheran Church (Danish), and the Finnish 
Evangelical Lutheran Church (Suomi Synod). Gruber Collection of Greek MSS 
from the 9th-15th centuries; early editions of German and English Bibles. 



133 



+ McCormick Theological Seminary: Collection strength in biblical studies including 
biblical archaeology, Reformation, patristics, and Evans American Bibliography in 
microprint. Special collections include Presbyteriana and the Condit and Simms 
English Bible Collections. 

Meadville /Lombard Theological School: Collection strengths in Unitarian 
materials, social ethics and history of religions. 

*Northern Baptist Theological Seminary: Collection strengths in Baptist history. 
Special collections consist of Baptist Association records, American Baptist Con- 
vention records, Danish and Norwegian Baptist Seminary material; A. T. Olm- 
stead Collection in Ancient Near Eastern Languages and Literature. 

The Ecumenical Parish Resource Center (EPRC), administered by the Jesuit/ 
Lutheran /McCormick libraries and located at LSTC, provides a variety of current 
resources for use in church programming. The Center's resources include ap- 
proximately 55 programs in religious education; a special collection of materials 
pertaining to the various functions of the congregation, including worship, 
ministry, and organization; and more than 150 simulation games. Along with such 
resources, the staff of the Center provides unique services in assisting 
denominational officials, pastors, seminary students and laypersons in developing 
meaningful programs for their judicatories, congregations, groups or classes. In- 
terested parties are invited to contact the Center for further information. 

*The libraries of Bethany and Northern Baptist are a merged library with integrated 
staffs and collections housed on the Bethany campus. 

+ The libraries of Jesuit, Lutheran, and McCormick are a joint library with in- 
tegrated staffs and collections housed on the Lutheran campus. 

CLUSTER THEOLOGICAL LANGUAGE COURSES 

In addition to the courses in biblical languages listed among the regular course 
offerings, non-credit courses in French, German and Latin are offered through the 
Cluster during each quarter of the academic year as warranted by student interest. 
The aim of the courses is to assist students to achieve facility in reading theological 
literature in the respective languages. Such facility is frequently employed to fulfill 
language requirements for certain degree programs. A nominal fee is charged. For 
further information contact the Cluster office. 



CLUSTER CENTER FOR THEOLOGY AND MINISTRY IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE 

Historical Background. Since its inception the Cluster has embodied a deepening 
commitment to the internationalization of theological education. This com- 
mitment has expressed itself through such diverse forms as extensive World 
Mission Study course offerings, a unique Cluster Area of Concentration in Cross- 
Cultural Communication, an Annual World Mission Institute, seminary-sponsored 
programs for overseas study and for faculty-student exchange with theological 
schools around the world, and various local programs planned by, with, and for 
international students and visiting faculty and lecturers from other nations. 

In order to strengthen its commitment to bring international perspectives to bear 
upon all aspects of theological education within its member schools and to secure 
resources to enhance such endeavors, during 1977 the Cluster has established a 
Center for Theology and Ministry in Global Perspective. Under the leadership of 
its Director and with the continuing assistance of its International Programs Coor- 
dinator and the Cluster Committee on International Programs, the new "Global 

134 



Perspective Center" (GPC) will explore more effective ways of illuminating 
theological study, ministerial preparation, and continuing education with insights 
and experiences of an international character. 

Resources. The GPC offers a rich setting in which to study theology and to begin 
or continue preparation for mission and ministry in a world perspective. Ecumeni- 
cally, the heritages of six Protestant and three Roman Catholic schools of the Cluster 
are complemented by those of other theological schools which comprise the Chicago 
Theological Institute (q.v., pp. 138-139). Educationally, the aforemen- 
tioned curricular and extra-curricular resources of the Cluster schools are enhanced 
by those of the Chicago Theological Institute and the University of Chicago, which 
latter provides wide offerings in languages and area studies. Cluster students from 
schools located in Hyde Park enjoy significant tuition reduction for work taken 
concurrently in the University and its Divinity School. 

Cluster World Mission Institute 

The seventh annual Cluster World Mission Institute will be held April 2-8, 1978. 
The theme will be "Missions and Human Rights." With ecumenical and in- 
ternational leadership, the Institute brings together students, missionaries, pastors, 
administrators, and scholars to identify and address problems and concerns that 
are of transcultural and international import. 

Institute topics in recent years have included The Role of the Missionary, 
Mission in One World, Evangelization and Human Development in the Third 
World, and From Independence to Interdependence in World Mission. A list of 
available publications, manuscripts , and cassette tapes related to previous In- 
stitutes may be obtained from the Cluster office. 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN RELIGION AND SCIENCE 

Historical Background. The Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science 
(CASIRAS) is an independent incorporated institution with an Advisory Board 
comprised of approximately one hundred internationally renowned scholars and 
scientists representing all major disciplines. Since 1970, CASIRAS has developed 
an increasingly close affiliation and effective working relationship with the 
Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools. 

The purposes of such cooperative relationship are to achieve a greater in- 
tegration between the scientific and religious models or images concerning the 
nature and destiny of humans in the context of the reality which created and 
sustains them, thereby to make possible a more effective interpretation of the long- 
evolved wisdom of our religious heritage. The involvement of CASIRAS in the 
following endeavors reflects such purposes. 

Advanced Seminar in Theology and the Sciences. The seminar was begun at 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School in 1965 under the direction of Ralph Wen- 
dell Burhoe, and is one of the precursors of interinstitutional Cluster faculty and 
student involvement in an interdisciplinary research project. The seminar and 
related conferences have provided Cluster personnel with opportunities for small- 
group discussion of new insights from the sciences for understanding human nature 
and destiny with such internationally distinguished scientists (including some 
Nobel Prize winners) as: H. Stanley Bennett, J. Bronowski, Sanborn C. Brown, 
Donald T. Campbell, Theodosius Dobzhansky, Alfred E. Emerson, Sir John Ec- 
cles, Clifford Geertz, Benson E. Ginsburg, Garrett Hardin, Dwight J. Ingle, 
Aharon Katchalasky-Katzir, Hermann Joseph Muller, Michael Polanyi, Van Rens- 
selaer Potter, C. L. Prosser, Arnold Ravin, Harlow Shapley, Sol Tax, and An- 
thony F. C. Wallace. Many of the papers shared by such scholars in the seminar 
have been published in Zygon or elsewhere and represent keys to new 

135 



breakthroughs of the wall separating religious and scientific understanding. Local 
and other theological faculty have also employed the seminar as a forum for 
presenting outstanding papers which foster pioneering understandings of a more 
positive relation of religion and science and which, upon publication, constitute a 
growing literature for such breakthroughs. The current offering, CCTS T-572: Ad- 
vanced Seminar in Theology and Sciences, is described on pp. 35-36. 

Fellows and Associates. A limited number of theologians and scientists from 
local as well as from West and East Coast institutions have been appointed Fellows 
and Associates of CASIRAS, sometimes for a sabbatical year, where they have 
written papers and books with the benefit and guidance and critical review by 
others associated with the Center. Several ministers have also come to CASIRAS as 
Associates for extended periods of continuing education. Their studies have 
similarly led to significant papers in the field, some of which have been published. 

Courses. From its inception CASIRAS has provided team-taught courses for 
Cluster students pursuing basic professional degrees. In 1970-71 the Center 
pioneered in organizing the Cluster's first year-long sequence, "Man and His En- 
vironment," which involved 12 faculty from 5 seminaries and an ecologist from a 
neighboring university, together with some 20 students from 5 schools. Other in- 
terinstitutionally team-taught courses have followed and a description of the 
current offering, CCTS T-472: Communicating the Religious Message in an Age of 
Science, may be found on p. 35. 

In addition to offering courses on the basic professional degree level, CASIRAS 
has been involved in thesis advising for advanced academic degrees. Moreover, 
from the outset CASIRAS has participated with faculties of Cluster schools in 
academic planning, including the development of (1) professional degree programs 
for students preparing for ministry and for clergy engaged in continuing 
education; (2) academic doctoral studies for future teachers and researchers within 
the framework of existing degree programs in the Cluster schools; and (3) post- 
doctoral programs for faculty. 

Conferences and Symposia. For many years CASIRAS, together with its af- 
filiated membership society, the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science (IRAS), 
has organized conferences and symposia on religion and the sciences. Among the 
more recent of such endeavors is a conference generated by four members of local 
theological faculties under the chairmanship of Philip Hefner of the Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago. Dealing with "The Human Prospect: Heilbroner's 
Challenge to Religion and Science," certain of the conference papers are published 
in Zygon (September, 1975). Many less formal discussions, including occasional ad 
hoc gatherings with other faculty and creative leaders in the field who are visiting 
in the Chicago area have also been arranged for students and faculty of the 
Cluster. 

Publishing. CASIRAS and IRAS are the joint publishers of Zygon, Journal of 
Religion and Science, edited by Ralph W. Burhoe. The journal has been published 
at the University of Chicago Press since 1966; its editorial offices are housed with 
the Cluster. Communications from religious and scientific personnel indicate that 
this journal, whose back-issue sales have been highest among the 33 journals of the 
University Press, constitutes an unusually valuable resource for those concerned 
with the new thrust to vitalize the religious message by rejoining religious and 
scientific knowledge. 

Guided Research and Study. CASIRAS makes available through the Cluster op- 
portunities which are unique among American theological schools for guided 
research and study in the area of theology and the sciences. 

For further information contact the Center for Advanced Studies in Religion and 
Science, 1100 East 55th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60615. Phone: (312) 667-3500, ext. 
268 or 643-5131. 

Ralph Wendell Burhoe, Director 

136 



INSTITUTE ON THE CHURCH IN URBAN-INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY 

The Institute on the Church in Urban-Industrial Society (ICUIS), based at Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary, was established in 1966 by the Presbyterian In- 
stitute of Industrial Relations in cooperation with the Advisory Group on Urban 
and Industrial Mission, Commission on World Mission and Evangelism, World 
Council of Churches. While retaining these historic relationships, during 1975 
ICUIS has become located with the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools and 
has established relationships with a wider range of American denominations. 

The Advisory Group on Urban and Industrial Mission, W.C.C., "recognized the 
Institute on the Church in Urban-Industrial Society as the one centre mandated by 
it to provide information and consultation on training facilities for urban and in- 
dustrial ministries as well as an international reference centre for literature and 
programme information in this field." In line with this mandate ICUIS performs a 
variety of data-collecting and program resourcing functions. 

As a center for the gathering of information, ICUIS provides an information 
bank which draws upon a continuing flow of case studies, project reports, articles, 
correspondence, books and other materials coming out of the church's in- 
volvement in the issues of urbanization, technological change, international justice 
and human development. This material is selected, annotated, indexed and 
distributed among a world-wide network in a monthly Abstract Service and a 
bibliographic service. Any of the more than 5,000 items in the ICUIS files, which 
are cross-indexed topically and geographically, can be retrieved upon request. 
Retrieval is facilitated by a regular Quarterly Index to the Abstract Service. The 
ICUIS information system is backed by over 100 file drawers of materials on 
issues, projects and studies on urban-industrial mission. 

Besides linking people engaged in the church's world-wide urban-industrial 
mission through information exchange, the resources of ICUIS have been used 

as models of involvement by those engaged in urban-industrial and metropolitan 
mission programs around the world; 

as teaching material by seminary and college professors in courses on church and 
society, the theology of mission, metropolitan and regional development, tech- 
nology and culture, and in continuing education and action training programs; 

as research material for students in courses or projects related to the church's 
involvement in societal issues; 

as a program resource by women's associations, couples' clubs, and young adult 
groups in issues related to the international dimensions of urbanization and 
technological change; 

as the basis for mission institutes and orientation programs for those going over- 
seas or for those returning from overseas assignments and for overseas persons 
assigned to ICUIS for periods of specialized study and action; 

as the basis for preparing bibliographies and program materials for special pro- 
gram emphases of church agencies. 

The resources of ICUIS are available to church agencies and local churches 
through the Abstract Service and other publications of ICUIS which provide up- 
to-date information on the international dimensions of the church's ur- 
ban-industrial mission; 

through the indexed material and the background files which provide program 
resources on the issues of metropolitan and technological change world- 
wide ; 

through consultation services to help plan institutes, seminars and conferences 
on the issues and the action involved in the internationalization of 
mission; 



137 



through orientation programs for people going overseas in the service of the 
church or of secular agencies, and week-end seminars for local churches. 

Ministers in Industry Program 

Ministers in Industry has for many years been a consciousness-raising and ex- 
perience-expanding summer work-seminar program aimed at putting seminary 
students in touch with life in industry. During the summer of 1978, the eight-week 
program will deal with "Work Issues in Contemporary America." The program's 
main purpose will be to focus students' attention on the ethos created by U.S. 
technology and the American productive system. 

Students are employed as wage earners in factories and service jobs during the 
day, and participate in a 3-hour seminar each week. The seminar portion of the 
program deals with the political, social, ethnic, racial, and economic issues faced 
by wage earners; with on-the-job problems; with full employment issues; with the 
effectiveness of the trade unions in democratizing the industrial process; and with 
the international impact of U.S. economic decisions. 

Content of the seminar discussions will be provided by observations and reflec- 
tions stemming from students' respective work situations and by preparatory 
readings. Each participant is expected to concentrate his or her attention on a given 
area of industrial experience, as reflected in the major issues noted above, and to 
prepare a paper on this particular issue. 

The seminar sessions will be led by Prof. Poethig, who will provide an outline 
and content analysis of each issue; each student will speak to the issue which he or 
she has chosen, reflecting on what has been learned in the work experience and in 
the readings. Where needed, outside expertise will also be drawn in. 

Students should plan to begin their summer employment by June 5, 1978, or as 
soon thereafter as possible. The orientation session will be held during the week 
beginning June 5, and the final seminar will be held during the week ending August 
5. Students who desire may continue their jobs beyond the conclusion of the 
seminar. An optional debriefing session will be held September 6, and all papers 
will be due no later than August 31. Evaluation will be based upon seminar per- 
formance, the paper, and work performance (in consultation with the labor 
relations or personnel department of the factory in which the student has worked). 

Enrollment is open to students who have completed one year of study at any ac- 
credited theological seminary. While the program is offered for 4 quarter hours 
credit, additional academic and/or clinical credit may be negotiated. Tuition for 
the program is payable to McCormick Theological Seminary at its regular rate for 
the number of credit hours sought. Applications for admission may be obtained in 
the office of the dean or registrar at each Cluster school or from ICUIS, and should 
be submitted to ICUIS by May 16, 1978. 

For further information, write or phone: Institute on the Church in Urban- 
Industrial Society, 5700 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637. Phone: 
(312) 643-7111. 

Richard P. Poethig, Director 

Bobbi Wells Hargleroad, Documentation Director 

Mary J. Kirklin, Administrative Assistant 

CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE 

The Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools enjoys a cordial and fruitful 
working relationship with the Chicago Theological Institute (CTI), which is a con- 
sortium of five theological schools located in the northern metropolitan area of the 
city. The member institutions of CTI are Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

138 



(United Methodist), North Park Theological Seminary (Evangelical Covenent), 
Seabury-Western Theological Seminary (Episcopal), Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School (Evangelical Free) and St. Mary of the Lake Seminary (Roman Catholic), 
an associate member. Each of these five institutions embodies a unique theological 
tradition or denominational affiliation which complements and enriches those 
represented among the nine schools of the Cluster. 

By common agreement between the two consortia students other than those pur- 
suing academic doctorates in each member school enjoy tuition-free cross- 
registration privileges in all other member schools. Most Cluster students thus 
have broad functional access without additional fees to significant curricular 
resources in fourteen theological schools which collectively represent a richness 
and diversity of ecumenical perspectives and theological traditions unduplicated in 
any other local setting. 

The procedures for cross-registering into CTI schools are identical to those for 
cross-registering into Cluster schools. Information regarding CTI course descrip- 
tions and schedules is available in the office of the dean and registrar at each 
Cluster school. Such information may also be obtained from the office of the dean 
or registrar of the respective CTI schools : 

Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 

2121 Sheridan Road Mundelein, Illinois 60060 
Evanston, Illinois 60201 566-6401 

273-2511 

North Park Theological Seminary Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

5125 North Spaulding Avenue 2045 Half Day Road 

Chicago, Illinois 60625 Deerfield, Illinois 60015 

583-2700 945-6700 

Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

2122 Sheridan Road 
Evanston, Illinois 60201 
328-9300 

CHICAGO AREA COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 

In addition to certain informal cooperative agreements which the Chicago 
Cluster of Theological Schools and its member institutions enjoy with various 
colleges and universities in the metropolitan area, one or more Cluster schools en- 
joy formal relationships with various local institutions of higher education. 
Through such relationships students at the respective seminaries enjoy correspon- 
dingly expanded and enriched educational offerings as well as a variety of 
significant benefits which may include participation in joint-degree programs; 
tuition reduction for course work; library privileges; and access to health services, 
cultural activities, and recreation facilities. 

The local colleges and universities with whom the respective Cluster schools en- 
joy such relationships are the following: 

DePaul University (DIT) 

Loyola University (JSTC, MTS) 

University of Chicago (CTS, CTU, JSTC, LSTC, M/L, MTS) 

University of Illinois at Chicago Circle (MTS) 

George Williams College (NBTS) 

Rosary College (MTS) 

Wheaton College (NBTS) 

Full particulars on these several relationships may be obtained by consulting the 
catalogs of the respective Cluster schools. 

139 



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